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0

I like the idea of an artificial sun inside a dome to provide energy, heat, and light. Of course, there may be some practical difficulties. Perhaps a more regular fission plant with sun lamps would be more feasible. Along with ocean staples like algae, seaweed, and fish, you could grow more regular crops with hydroponics or even regular farms. Meat ...


0

This is essentially the same as planning to build a habitat on another planet. The most reasonable means of farming and food production are exactly the things we are planning to do in space. Hydroponics and vertical farming allow for efficient food production. With that you could grow just about any fruits and veggies outside of large crops like grain and ...


2

Buildings: Large steel domes filled with air would be the most durable building on the bottom of the ocean. Glass would be risky since a small crack would create a huge problem. Mining: Drilling for oil in underwater deposits would be way easier if the oil drill were sitting on the ocean floor. Farming / food: Kelp farms would be efficient on the ocean ...


0

this theoretical society could farm bacteria from artificially created vents. These bacteria cultures could be developed to feed many people. These would be the only food that could be developed in bulk to feed the deep sea masses.


8

Europa has a surface gravity of about $13\%$ of Earth's. This means the force (weight) of the water in Europa's oceans is proportionately less than on Earth. If you divide Earth's deepest ocean depth (about $11\,km$) by $0.13$ you get a "Europa equivalent depth" of about $85\,km$, which is actually the ballpark for Europa's deepest ocean depth estimates. ...


0

Plate tectonics has nothing to do with sea level; you can have plate tectonics with no water or tons of water. Given Earth's actual landmasses, no, there would be no above-sea-level land. I am hesitant to say it is impossible on any Earth-like planet, but 40 miles seems insane to me. Mount Everest is only 5.5 miles tall. The issue is that the Earth's ...


0

I am uncertain whether you mean a double planet or a toroidal planet. Double: It is not likely. It is most definitely possible for two roundish asteroids to collide and stick together like that, but if the asteroids got big enough to hold any kind of atmosphere, the gravity would probably crush them into a sphere. There is another way it might happen, ...


1

Looking at the map as it stands I would actually expect that the northern and southern oceans would have independent subsurface gyres that would rotate below permanent sea ice. We have similar currents in Earth's southern ocean with the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and on a much smaller scale with the Beaufort Gyre. I would expect the same on this world.


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I'm not even going to try to address that wall of questions. So I will limit myself to the first half of question #2. To avoid scurvy, would it need its own farm using bought soil to grow vegetables for the long periods living out at sea? Addressing the scurvy issue: lacto-fermentation produces Vit C. So pickles, sauerkraut, kim chee, etc. It's also ...


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