New answers tagged

9

How About Glaciation? Northern Canada, Greenland, and Iceland are a series of HUGE islands that don't have a directional alignment. Not being a geologist, I assume most of these islands were carved by the weight of glaciers over time, basically wearing down the land until it met the sea. Since the islands in your map are pretty far north, you could say ...


5

Hawaiian style! https://www.marinebio.net/marinescience/02ocean/hwgeo.htm Hawaii is geologically a unique place on Earth because it is caused by a 'hot spot.' Most islands are found at tectonic plate boundaries either from spreading centers (like Iceland) or from subduction zones (like the Aleutian Islands). There are few 'hot spots' on Earth ...


13

An example: the Pannonian Sea The Pannonian Sea was an inland sea which existed for about 10 million years; during the last part of its existence it was isolated from the ocean. It covered most of the territory of modern country of Hungary, and large parts of Croatia, Serbia and Romania. I would say that this qualifies as a "very large lake". The Pannonian ...


12

Not an original starting point, I recognize it, but Randall Munroe already covered this answer in one of his What if. What you see above here is how Earth would look like once you drained the oceans (and made the Netherlands much bigger). To use Randall's words: There's a surprising amount of water left, although much of it consists of very shallow seas,...


20

Absolutely. During the Messinian Salinity Crisis the 'sea level' in the Mediterranean Sea was THOUSANDS of meters lower than that of the Atlantic ocean, for thousands of years. The important thing for your example is that there would need to be a large enough surrounding drainage area to keep sea level in your archipelago stable relative to evaporation. ...


14

The Great Lakes, Lake Baikal, the Caspian Sea, and the Dead Sea are all reasonably large bodies of water that are not at global sea level. The Great Lakes are hundreds of feet above the global sea level. The Dead Sea is not very large, but it is relatively close to the Mediterranean and Red Seas.


8

There are parts of Earth's oceans, never mind landlocked sea-size lakes, that have differing sea levels. The Atlantic and Pacific differ by a couple meters, as measured from the center of the earth -- this is measurable across the Strait of Magellan (off the Cape of Good Hope at the tip of Tierra del Fuego). There is a constant current in the Bosporus ...


3

Let's do some Geo-Engeneering Others have already proposed the sane ways for doing land reclamation, which leaves me with the insane ways of doing it. A question, dear reader, is this enough reclaimed land for your purposes? This looks somewhat like current Earth, but all the continents seem to have gotten fat. The most noticeable changes are the now ...


4

as @L.Dutch already say theres many country do this. the method https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Land_reclamation Land reclamation can be achieved with a number of different methods. The most simple method involves filling the area with large amounts of heavy rock and/or cement, then filling with clay and dirt until the desired height is reached. ...


8

We have some examples in our real world of pushing back the ocean, just to cite a few: The Dutch Afsluitdijk The Afsluitdijk (literally translated: Shut-off-dike) was completed in 1932, thereby shutting off the Zuiderzee (lit: Southern Sea) from the North Sea. Until then, the Zuiderzee had been a large bay south of the North Sea which gave maritime ...


1

Narrow or Dam the straits of Gibraltar In order to make the sea less salty by geological means, you need to take water out of the sea, evaporate it to dryness, then have it fall as rain. There is a net inflow of water into the Mediterranean sea through the 14km wide Strait of Gibraltar, and evaporation causes the mediterreanean sea to accumulate salt, ...


7

The other answers are great. But if we were to assume the same amount of land over the same timeframe with no special salt-gathering creatures, there's a least one other thing that would do it: Start out with a planet composed of less salts. There are of course many salts, some of them compounds, but the majority of salt in the ocean is sodium and chloride....


12

Introduce a microorganism that sequesters salt. Trees and plants sequester carbon: they take in CO2 and build the carbon into their physical structure. Coral sequesters calcium. What you need is a microorganism that seeks out salt and makes it a part of itself or, even better, builds it into structures like reefs (better because the salt stays locked up ...


13

Go back in time The seas millions and billions of year back were less saltier than today: In the beginning, the primeval seas were probably only slightly salty. But over time, as rain fell to the Earth and ran over the land, breaking up rocks and transporting their minerals to the ocean, the ocean has become saltier. At some point, they would have ...


31

Less land It's actually pretty easy. There are two ways to make an ocean less salty. The first way is to remove salt, and the second is to add fresh water, both of which are possible, but takes a lot of effort and won't really occur naturally. But the better question is, what makes an ocean salty in the first place and can we prevent that from happening? ...


4

You should read the wiki for biological immortality: Biological immortality (sometimes referred to as bio-indefinite mortality) is a state in which the rate of mortality from senescence is stable or decreasing, thus decoupling it from chronological age. Various unicellular and multicellular species, including some vertebrates, achieve this state either ...


3

It could be that if she lives on the ocean floor and doesn't move, that the oceanic sediment that collected on her shell became home to many organisms, like choral, mollusks, etc, that have built up the protective barrier on her shell. Just think what a shipwreck looks like after only a couple hundred years. That would also make her that much more imposing ...


11

What would she look like after a few hundred years of submersion? Like a really big lobster. Regular lobsters live in the sea, and can live to over 100 years old and still look just like lobsters. They just get slightly bigger and slightly heavier after each moult. Normal crustaceans stop moulting eventually (perhaps due to sensescence, or perhaps due to ...


Top 50 recent answers are included