78

For simplicity, let's pretend these are well designed nanobots that don't outright kill their host by blood clots or accidentally ripping holes in capillaries. So let's pretend these great scientists already killed a bunch of small woodland laboratory creatures and got those little issues figured out relatively early on. We'll assume these nanobots are the ...


65

Why, glucose and oxygen! These have significant benefits: Fuel cells are already available technology, so you can get electricity from pretty much anything that would normally burn. Should be possible to adapt it to work on glucose all right You already want oxygen and glucose in blood. Both are pretty easy to supplement. No real need to store energy, as ...


44

There are two kinds of summoning, when you really get down to it. There's the summoning where the summoned wants to be summoned, and there is the summoning where the summoned is compelled to be summoned. Define your demon, and its behaviors, and you define how to summon it. It may want to be summoned, in which case this is extremely easy to explain. The ...


42

The nanites use IPv6 for communication. Source of the image above: https://xkcd.com/865/ They are limited therefore to 2128 bots operating at the same time. Any extra nanobots are unable to communicate with the network and self-destruct themselves. Edit: I love this comment: You need to use IPv4. The Earth has a surface of 1.48 $\times$ 1014m2. That ...


35

Piezoelectricity Since plasticity is a required function of these nanobots and the heart is going to be compressing them at a steady rate, piezoelectricity is your very best friend here. As it's generated very simply, there are no moving parts required, no batteries to charge, no complex chemicals, all you have to do is stay alive and they'll keep running, ...


35

With most firearms, the simplest, quickest way to "brick" the piece (without killing or maiming anyone, including the users) is to weld moving parts together so they become non-moving parts. The cylinder in a revolver can't rotate, the firing pin and slide in a semi-auto won't move on their rails or in their passage. The ammunition would be unsafe to ...


32

Use tentacles. Lots of tentacles. You never go wrong with tentacles and there is never too much of them. A prisoner dangling from tentacles slithering over their bodies has no leverage to free themselves regardless of how strong they are. They cannot tear apart the tentacles because the tentacles are constantly moving and can easily maintain their grip ...


31

Graphene is what you're looking for. With a tensile strength of 130000 MPa, it has (IIRC) the highest tensile strength in the world. So lets make a wire-thin sword! I envision it to probably end up looking something like this: >----------------------------------------------<| ||||||| | ...


29

Since all the other ones I thought of have already been used, I had to go find something else. The one I was going to use was piezoelectricity (though I didn't know what it was called!) And I think that would be the most useful for machines of this size. However, my contribution to this would be Inductive charging. It uses an electromagnetic field ...


27

Your ruleset has put you in a corner. You state that they can disassemble "ANY organic/nonorganic compound into their core components." The typical definition of "nonorganic" is "any compound which is not organic." By logic, that says your nanomachines can disassemble "ANY compound into its core components." Thus, by straightforward logic, no material is ...


27

Well, we can't do it now so the only answer we have is 'more than we have now'. Alright, this isn't strictly true, insofar as we can cryogenically freeze embryos and the like, and we can then thaw them and bring them to term so depending on your definition of 'someone', arguably the minimum technology someone needs is the ability to create and maintain ...


26

A Programmed Feature: This idea is inspired by Willk's answer, though there have been other good ideas in the thread. It's a deliberate design choice by the long ago designers of the craft. Meant to help highlight and locate damaged components - the nanites activate a phosphorescent effect whenever chunks of the ship become separated from each other. ...


24

Magnets Just make the shackles out of iron or some other metal, then place magnets inside / on the walls. Turn them on and off and there you have your "magically pinned to the wall" effect.


21

Actually, targeting lasers sound fine to me... The scout investigates the structure, carefully aims the (visible?) targeting laser when no one is looking... then switches it off. he actual emitter is some distance from the structure, so not likely to be noticed, and the targeting dot doesn't exist once the scout leaves until the missile is about to impact. (...


20

G-Force The "room" is actually moving. It can be made to move very fast and will thus exert very strong force on anybody inside. Very likely pinning them to the opposite wall. One way to do this is if you have the room attached to a spinning arm similar to ones used for testing pilots. The problem might be that if you have anything else that's not ...


20

As a completely different option to my other answer... you're going about this wrong. What you want is "passive LIDAR" (caveat: this means you missiles might only work during the day), combined with really good GPS. The scouts don't "paint" the targets in the field at all. Instead, all they do is passively collect enough visual data to ...


18

You should not think of a nanobot like a 'eating'-animal or something. This would be a big problem, due they only could handle molecules and cells wich are smaller than they are, plus they need additional size for some extracting or cutting mechanics to get the molecules/cells off whatever they're attached to. Better think of nanobots like enzymes. They ...


18

Anything that is programmable, is hack-able. The first thing to do would be to hack the nanobots. Also 'tinfoil' hats come in here, block the incoming and outgoing signals and you have some control and privacy. The most likely scenario would be for the resistance to find a 'kill' switch for the nanobots so they become inert or permanently shut down. That ...


18

Let me be blunt A microscopic LED is entirely believable. I'd ignore all the explanations of why or why not and roll with the idea. Now the answer LEDs are diodes that emit light when they're in their operational state. Fundamentally, when you ignore the mechanics of miniturization (fabrication), your limitations are three-fold. First, even at magical ...


18

Daiquiri cryonics This is my favorite low tech method. Blood sugar and blood alcohol (and also acetone) are driven up in tandem. Way up. The person does not die of diabetic coma because her blood alcohol is so high, and does not die of alcohol poisoning because she is so cold that brain metabolism is slowed. You want the body no colder than the freezing ...


17

One starting point would be to ask what objects have survived for 10000 years in reality? One possible survival would be artwork and jewelry. In particular I am thinking of artwork that was carved into durable materials like stone or bone or glass. Even just painting inside a cave can last 10000 years or more. Since these objects are not themselves "...


17

You need a trigger word. Right now, I can summon a big red round demon with the trigger phrase "hey Siri." My parents summon a materialistic demon with the trigger word "Alexa." Your demon bots (and nanites, etc) network with each other and if the summoning is done within earshot of any one of them, the message will go to the right demon who can respond, ...


16

You can also use the great power of physics. A high intensity electromagnetic pulse (EMP) could shutdown every nanite in a given area. This could be used. An atomic bomb exploding safely away could destroy nanites of a entire city. You could build a EMP generator only for you, with "few" use of electricity, an using accessible material to everyone. You can ...


15

Really it depends on how they work. Software Injecting a software virus to disrupt the network might work if they are reprogrammable. Rival Goo Add your own nanomachines that take apart the first ones and rebuild them to themselves then shutdown. Energy Weapons Directed energy weapons or similar might be used to destroy them without presenting them ...


15

Keep in mind that archaeology can learn as much by what is missing as by what is present. In the UK we have a stone-age village from thousands of years ago that has been recreated by analyzing the holes in the ground that the huts and their support posts made. These houses were made completely from wood but the evidence lay preserved in the ground until ...


15

You're going to trigger a cultural problem, that of the importance of being seen to do over actually doing. Let's consider two people One is a young man of no great resource, he helps little old ladies across the road, works in a soup kitchen during his holidays and helps his elderly neighbours with chores they can't handle any more. There's no question ...


15

Yes, it's possible to have LED displays with microscopic pixels. 3.74 μm qualifies as microscopic, I think. The JD4704 is currently the world’s first 0.7”, color sequential, 4K2K LCoS microdisplay comprised of over 10 million of the world’s smallest all-digital pixels, with a 3.74 x 3.74 μm pixel size. Order them from this company: https://www....


14

TL;DR EMPs probably won't work and simple magnets won't help on silicon machines. But offering honey-pot-counter-bots that attach to the offender and render them useless or use blood transfusion and a cleaning mechanism might work. Reality Check Professor Bradley Nelson of ETH Zürich managed to build a nanomachine that could be remote controlled and moved ...


14

I'm wishing I'd kept up my fluid dynamics now. A significant quantity could start affecting the viscosity of your blood which would place extra strain on your heart, making the long term benefits questionable. Read the bit about blood viscoelasticity. If your nano-bots don't deform in a similar manner to red blood cells you could have some very interesting ...


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