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52

Actual brazillian here. The reason why you won't find any mountable animals in the amazon rain forest is because it's kinda like a more green, lush version of Australia, in the aspect that half of the biomass is out to kill you in horrible ways. It is a [redacted] to go through the jungle, on foot or otherwise. And the river waters can be classified in ...


40

Oryginal question was about velociraptor. Then, strictly speaking, no. But raptor, probably. What's a velociraptor? Thanks largely to Jurassic Park, "Velociraptor" has come into common use to represent smart, human-killing pack hunters. Sadly, Velociraptor proper is about the size of a turkey, so you could never ride one. The name was used to refer ...


35

No, but plenty of their relatives can A moose or elk would die in the high heat and with limited resistance to insects and such. They simply aren't designed for the rainforest. However, there are plenty of animals large enough to mount that are native to a rainforest, and a rainforest alone. Bongo Lowland Anoa Okapi These animals are not domesticated, so ...


32

Many problems. The first is that carnivores large enough to ride are few and all are very dangerous. Grizzly bear, Siberian tiger, Lions all are large enough for a human to ride. However all are dangerous, even today when these are made pets they still can maul people, even their owners. Second, especially for times past, these animals are a large ...


29

There are a few assumptions to make here before answering, most of which fall under the lines of 'define cow'. If you are going for buffalo: A cavalry charge (in knight terms) was at its most destructive from sheer momentum. Ya, the mounted rider can help with the invent of the lance, but the ability to break a defensive line has more to do with the ...


28

Mount the gun, yes The M134 has a lightweight variant, which weighs just under 20kg. I think that's entirely plausible to mount on an animal that size - use leather or some other padding underneath the gun so no metal touches skin, vibrations are minimised, and using leather belts to wrap around and tighten. You'd want a few attachment points at varying ...


24

In my story, there is a civilization living in the Amazon rainforest. They need some time of mount that is adapted to the forest. There are Buffalos in the Amazon (in the Brazilian state of ParĂ¡) and they can be used to mount: They live primarily near farmlands (in the Amazon region), but they have been adapted to live in the same climate as the forest. ...


22

Your harness is not a saddle The thing about horse saddles is that they are designed to help keep a rider comfortable and on top of an animal while functioning as a sort of seat with your legs going off to either side of the horse's back ... but this dragon's body is far too large get your legs around, meaning you can't just sit on it with a normal saddle. ...


19

Reptiles lack aerobic endurance. I thought this was because they were cold blooded but apparently it is an artifact of how they use their spines - excellent excerpt below. http://reptilis.net/myths.html It is true that many reptiles today lack aerobic endurance, that this is caused by their "cold-bloodedness" though, is blatantly false. The lack of ...


18

I'm delighted (and astonished) to say yes, not only has it been done but it is being done as a business. Kimberly and Annette here demonstrate just how well behaved their broken steers are. YouTube video of Kimberly riding Jazzy, and Annette driving Dozer. They make appearances at birthday parties, visit senior centers, go to schools and community ...


15

The best choices here are actually not going to be that exciting but there are many options around the globe for transportation/pack animals. Around the globe, you have camels, donkeys, llamas, oxen, reindeer, elephants and water buffaloes. Some potential options that I don't think have been done before are american bison, Elk, and moose. The idea of a ...


15

Use Chariots Others have suggested carts but I will go one step further and suggest chariots. Chariots only have two wheels so they can handle terrain that carts can't. They can be designed to fit just one centaur (with a cart, the centaur(s) would be knocked around a lot) and have firm railings to grab on it (like the ones made for humans have). Or they ...


13

Well on one hand, many of the animals which aren't horses that have been domesticated over the years for a similar purpose of transportation would be used far more often. Donkeys would likely be the popular choice because although they are stubborn, they will still take you to where you need to go, and they can also carry quite a bit. Camels too would be ...


12

The "saddle" will be a shirtlike construction, worn by the "rider". This saddle shirt will offer a large padded scruff, which the jaguar will take in its teeth, carrying the dwarf as it would one of its own kittens. This allows the cat to carry another creature in the manner it is accustomed, taking all the care it would with one of its own kittens. The ...


12

There are a couple of problems. Weight. 3 humans are light. OK. But then you are adding machine guns. But ok, your mount is tough. However you are also adding several other weapons and then you are adding armor and a sort of electrical system for the weapons but wait there is more. AMMO! Vibrations. The poor animal is not an infantry fighting vehicle. ...


11

Putting climate and disease environment aside, because kingledion covered them, there is the issue of antlers and rainforest growth. Rainforests don't have an open understory the way mature conifer or oak woodlands do, as such anything that grows a large rack of antlers is seriously maladapted to moving around and feeding in the environment. There is ...


10

A 1 ton pig is essentially a female black rhino with no horn. Elephants are much taller and heavier. A female black rhino would be the same mass, and have the same body shape. Copy the rhino's leg structure. Keep in mind there are much larger rhinos out there, a male white rhino can get up to about 4 tons.


10

I don't see much practical use in riding a bull instead of a horse, they are slower, for one, with an average top speed of just around 40km/h compared to a horse which has a top speed of 88km/h, and are considerably dumber than horses. Not to mention the most crippling problem, their eyesight. Field of Vision- When cattle have their heads down to graze, ...


9

Maybe Pros (relative to a camel) Long life span: The life span of creature tends to increase with size. While you can get 20 years out of a domesticated horse or camel, a Komodo Dragon, which is significantly smaller, has about 20 years between sexual maturity and average lifespan in the wild. Life expectancy would go up in captivity and go up again once ...


9

Water buffalo! Yeah! http://www.ezytourthailand.com/packages/Buffalo-Racing.html If you want to see some amazing images, google up the annual Water Buffalo race in Thailand. Some are being ridden solo like this one and there must also be a category for 2-buffalo chariots. These water buffalo are cooking along. This is not a rodeo - by the number of ...


8

Camels Where I lived in the UAE they were treated similarly - used as beasts of burden, transportation, but also there were regular endurance races and even beauty pageants! They're stronger, bigger, faster and nicer*. They also produce a lot of very nutritious milk. This might not be the sexy answer you're looking for, but when you're riding a camel, it'...


8

Depending on the weight of the rider or the load carried, an ostrich could make a good mount. I have only seen people ride them short distances though. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=plk35VYDKZE They seem to be having trouble staying on, but an improved saddle might be all that is needed. The ostrich is an omnivore so finding food for it should be no ...


8

I think the key word here is dragon. Build a wooden wagon and cover it in dragon scales. It would be the only item to protect you from dragons, not only their fire but also due to the look of it (when turned upside down) will simply look like a dragon in a ball and thus as they won't attack their own serve as protection. It also fits the narrative quite ...


8

North America did, in fact, have horses (actually, the genus Equus evolved in North America), which went extinct 11,000-13,000 years ago: https://www.statelinetack.com/content/general-information/the-prehistoric-horses-of-north-america/ Though some survived by crossing the Bering Strait land bridge into Eurasia, evolving into the European horses of today. ...


8

No, they can't carry that much Let's take stock of just how much you are carrying: 3 average human riders = 186kg 3 saddles = 21kg 1 minigun = 20-63kg (depending on which you go with) 1 average car battery = 19kg enough ammo for 2 minutes of sustained fire = 140-360kg (depending on which you go with) Weapons and ammo for side riders 30-120kg additional kit ...


8

The saddle has saddlebags To circumvent any difficulties with buoyancy or surface, why not just add saddlebags. It makes sense for such travel to have the option to store a lot of stuff for both the driver, passengers and the dragon. The saddlebags are sealed against water for air travel. Some are likely empty or close to empty, making for great buoyancy. ...


7

The main problem with having horse-sized dogs that are bred to carry knights into battle is one of economic feasibility, not military feasibility. Militarily, a giant dog that was armoured to be better able to survive in a battle with enemies wielding sharp objects would be a great idea - dogs are carnivores, and would require less training and incentive in ...


7

Hypothetically, a pack animal with a strong sense of hierarchy and loyalty to leader, like wolf or hyena, could be ridden by a human, given it's large enough and has been trained for this kind of activity since puppyhood. However I don't see a big cat, or a bear, or any other solitary animal to be a reliable mount. If we're talking about a fantasy species, ...


7

I noticed this thread at the front page and could have sworn I gave an answer to it. It turns out, though, I only gave an answer to a similar question which can be found here. In it I included some giraffids from the Miocene, which wouldn't exactly fit the bill for "realistic" (although the Pleistocene Sivatherium could hypothetically become a draft animal)....


7

With a long enough and strong enough rope, and enough animals, certainly you could pull any load. I think the real challenge would be getting a wagon made of stone that will not break. To simplify things I'm going to assume that modern structural concrete is similar to a best case scenario for something carved out of solid stone, because they have similar ...


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