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The small ones are not actually meteors. Large meteors are well represented in museums; space stones and metal chunk. But a chance encounter with a small meteor destined to burn up in the atmosphere revealed that it was not a space stone, but a built thing: an alien artifact. The smaller fractions of the class of "meteorites" contains a fair proportion of ...


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I don't think that you need dimmer meteors to be more valuable. Let's consider a rather simple model. Detectors come in steps and doubling the cost halves the brightness at which meteors can be spotted. We'll ignore that meteors that are farther away can be seen sooner with better detectors (already explained at this answer). And we'll pretend that all ...


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The Earth is hit by aprox. 18,000 to 84,000 meteorites bigger than 10 grams per year, but very few are bigger than one kilogram. Even big meteorites aren't that big, and can be quite worthless if their composition is not of valuable things. But by tracking 10s of thousands of impacts you can prioritize how valuable each impact is based on how much info ...


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I like your idea of information, e.g. for tracking objects that do not make contact with earth (yet). A small meteor has as much info (direction and speed) as a large one, but detecting smaller one lets you detect a lot more of them, providing you with a lot more info. As for why that info is valuable: You might be looking for valuable asteroids to harvest....


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Consider it from the opposite direction. The goal isn't to detect the fainter meteors (although that's an okay side benefit). The goal is to detect the bright ones from further away, so that you can find them first. Clearly ownership of the meteor('s profits) doesn't belong to the person whose property it lands on. If it did, you wouldn't need to detect ...


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"In a near miss with Jupiter, the largest meteor known "Cerse's Tail" fractured into countless small fragments. These fragments, in erratic orbits are landing randomly on the earth. It turns out Cerse's Tail was especially rich in rare earth metals and platinum, above the average, but most of the fragments are too small to be detected by conventional testing ...


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