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153

Kamacite and Taenite Kamacite and Taenite are both Iron-Nickel alloys found (on Earth) only in meteorites. Kamacite's composition is in the 90:10 to 95:5 Fe:Ni range. Taenite's composition is from 20% to 65% Nickel. Kamacite, in particular, can form massive crystals. A kamacite crystal listed in table 1 here had dimensions of 0.92x0.54x0.23 meters, and a ...


110

Manacoin. Manacoin (abbreviated as mc) is an ethereal currency that only exists as shared thoughts in the astral plane. Everyone can create astral "wallets" to store manacoins. Wallets have names, which can be used to put money into them, and activation words, which are used to take money from them. A wallet can be tapped by anyone who knows its activation ...


110

There's a lot of toxic metals. Most are toxic in fact (including iron technically, if you get enough of it). Almost all of them have issues though: Mercury: One of the first metals many people think of when they are thinking of poisons. The problem here is quite simply that even those mercury alloys that are solid at room temperature (known as amalgams) ...


109

It turns out to be radioactive. It's light, it's beautiful, it's strong. ... but anyone who carries or wears the metal for more than a very short period of time eventually gets sick. This wasn't known during the initial gold rush and the metal was used to make various things... but eventually the people who handled it most or wore or carried pieces got ...


97

Make the Legend last through the ages So, Merlin telemagicks to 5000 years ago, presents the sword-in-cement LEGEND to some fancy king. Then he rigs up some scenario where the sword is found. People try and fail to remove the sword, the legend spreads. Merlin then causes some event (flood, landslide, magic POOFing, etc) to disappear the sword. The sword ...


97

Replicas The blacksmith did his job to perfection - the equipment just never got to the army. The saboteurs act as middlemen in the delivery system. The carriages holding the gear are intercepted midway and swapped with shitty quality replicas that look exactly like the blacksmith's equipment. This could work in at least two ways: The saboteurs have a ...


95

Sure. Gems such as diamonds, corundums (ruby and sapphire) come from igneous sources. It's possible that one could have a diamondiferous kimberlite blast through a gold or silver ore-bearing formation, or an intrusive dyke that produces rubies or sapphires to penetrate into a similar formation. It's unlikely, given the relative rarity of the two different ...


93

Merlin knows about metallurgy, and will place in the immediate surroundings of the rock (or even IN the rock) a sacrificial anode made of magnesium, aluminium, zinc or another suitable metal. A galvanic anode is the main component of a galvanic cathodic protection (CP) system used to protect buried or submerged metal structures from corrosion. By simply ...


86

Titanium is actually a fascinating example standing by itself, because it's not that hard to find (it was identified as an element before 1800, and is the ninth-most abundant element in Earth's crust) but it's very difficult to work. Titanium can't be shaped simply by heating it and pouring or working it like you might do with iron, steel, brass, or the ...


86

Moving away from a pure element (covered by other answers) to a material, something that has a special property. Consider something that is made rare by the very presence of your intergalactic society. Let's suppose your warp drives give off low-levels of some kind of radiation, so any alloys destined for sensitive equipment need to be space-smelted in ...


84

All that gold makes gold virtually worthless so people would put it to practical use like construction. The Pantheon is held together with iron bars coated in lead to slow down corrosion. You could get better protection coating iron in gold. You can coat roofs in gold leaf for excellent waterproofing. The ancient Romans used lead pipes for water. Gold ...


70

Can there be hereditary Servants of the Sword? These folks would live nearby, working the earth etc but they take responsibility for periodically going out to visit the Sword and putting a fresh coat of grease on it. Maybe they could have special hats - worn only for the sword greasing, you know.


64

Upon a very quick check it looks like titanium has a melting point of around 1600ºC and magma has an average temperature of around 700ºC to 1300ºC. Given that you could pretty quickly assume that as long as your characters aren't just running every enemy creature straight through and leaving their weapons inside their adversaries for long periods the swords ...


53

A sword is forged from one piece of metal. The hilts & guards are just embellishments (important ones — more later). I'm sure you have seen many accounts of swords (katanas etc.) being forged from many pieces. This is because most of those weapons were made from poor steel and the forging techniques were designed to overcome this. In any event, ...


53

Heat up the products above the eutectoid temperature to form austenite and then rapidly quench it to induce the formation of martensite. This will induce the formation of hardened steel which is more brittle. Martensite is formed in carbon steels by the rapid cooling (quenching) of the austenite form of iron at such a high rate that carbon atoms do not ...


52

Could an earth-like planet form without accessible traces of iron Without iron, you'd need a completely different biochemistry, and would in practice condemn the newcomers to a slow death. Iron is essential for hemoglobin synthesis and humans need to acquire it from food: from vegetables (most green leaves) or already concentrated in muscle tissue (by ...


52

Well... money. what value have that piece of paper you call 100$? What value have that piece of paper you call check? Exactly what you want it to have. If you're asking what support the value of said note then it also can be anything. Maple syrup. Choco beans. Value of gold in ye olde goode times was not derived from it's abilities but due to it's ...


41

Let it rust. Seriously. A thick chunk of steel is already going to last ages without any special treatment. It will corrode on the outside for sure, but this adds to the authenticity of just how old it is. Maybe build a gazebo over it to keep the absolute worst of the weather off. It'll be way more exciting when "he whom the wizard deems worthy" finally ...


41

How would this difference affect Earth's overall chemistry? Not much (but see below). Here's why: Let's start with some background The core–mantle differentiation event was the melting event which caused separation of the rocky mantle and the metallic core. It separated earth into two phases (in the chemical sense): Metal, which is dense so it sank to ...


40

Don't make space iron better. Make all other iron worse. Read up on Low Background Steel. Have all of earth's iron contaminated with something, and less useful than we think of iron being. At some time in the past, there was a cataclysmic event which contaminated all iron with something. Maybe the Elder Gods awoke, and their presence cause decay or ...


38

The primary reason why gold is so valuable is because of scarcity. Once you eliminate scarcity there are many uses that gold can be put to. Chemically it is highly nonreactive making it a good fit for containing reactive materials and foodstuffs, and anywhere that you want a durable cladding that doesn't require much strength. It conducts heat well making ...


36

You'd think that a lighter material just as strong as steel would make better armor, as there are two possible ways to go about it; the same design and thickness but lighter weight resulting in increased battle mobility, or a thicker design which keeps the total weight but has more material since it's so much lighter. You thought wrong. Knights in full ...


36

Why Things Are Valuable Basic economic theory says that a thing will have a higher cost as its demand outpaces its supply. Note that this doesn't actually take rarity into account at all. Rare things are expensive because they have an inherently small supply, but you can also have a relatively common thing be expensive just by increasing the demand for it ...


32

Handmade items made by a famous artisan from a famous planet. These items could be decorative (paintings, vases), utilitarian (glassware, pottery, handbag, shoes), or functional (instrument, book (signed and numbered). Basically anything that takes personal effort to make will cost more simply because someone will have to put forth the effort rather than ...


31

You can still have similar iron content to Earth, without forming any useful deposits. We think that most of the iron deposits we're mining today come from a period with relatively low oxygen followed by a major release of free oxygen. The two main events on Earth correspond to the Oxygen catastrophe (when photosynthesizing organisms first appeared on a ...


31

Absurdly strong metal! Well, in the current location/situation - for example, halfway up a snowy mountain. Unfortunately, those properties change greatly with temperature - taking our "strong when cold" example, by 20°C it's soft, malleable, and can barely hold its own weight up. By 35°C it's completely melted. A good door for withstanding the elements ...


30

Weight is not an issue The Wikipedia page for Plate Armor says the following: A complete suit of plate armour made from well-tempered steel would weigh around 15–25 kg (33-55 pounds). The wearer remained highly agile and could jump, run and otherwise move freely as the weight of the armour was spread evenly throughout the body. ...until it is One of ...


30

Two downsides to working with tungsten metal crucibles. The first is that tungsten has higher affinity for oxygen than iron, so oxygen in the liquid iron will react with the tungsten. Unfortunately, tungsten oxide is not coherent with tungsten, so the oxide will spall off as it forms, and get into the steel. Because the tungsten oxide isnt controlled in ...


28

Your tiny person will not find pellets of metallic iron in the dirt. Iron will rust on the surface. But he might find gold, and even better, copper. The North American Indians (Mound Builder culture) extensively worked copper with no use of heat - all by cold hammering. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metallurgy_in_pre-Columbian_America#North_America Here ...


26

Removing the weight but retaining the mass means that the inertia is also retained. This has several consequences. Imagine if someone were to try to run and then subsequently trip while wearing a full plate suit of this metal. They would end up tumbling due to the mass of the suit, but only slowing down due to the friction caused by the weight of everything ...


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