177

The question shows a misunderstanding of why the Middle Ages were medieval. It's not that the people who lived in those times did not know any better. They did. In particular, they had good Roman books about military strategy, tactics and logistics; for example, they had and they actually read Vegetius's De re militari; the book was copied over and over, and ...


161

Medieval times are an area of study for me, so let me tell you a little about the way the law worked during that time. This may be a different world, but I can give you a background on history and how theft was dealt with. First, by the time you reached the age of 12 in many principalities if you did not take action against a crime committed which you knew ...


112

Scenario 1: The King declares: "I have decided to use the Truth Stone to root out any and all corruption in my administration." Stone vanishes from behind 5 supposedly locked and guarded doors, with nary a trace the very next day. King Terren reloads. Scenario 2: The King declares: "I have decided to use the Truth Stone to root out any and all cheating ...


108

Distances between Medieval towns varied quite widely, as did the population and size. I think the estimate, and this is a low estimate, for England was that there were over 3,000 deserted Medieval villages that they hadn't discovered. Now, there are also going to be communities in between smaller than your 400 person population--groupings of families and ...


101

Depressing, realistic version: John Doe has major problems: His modern skills are of little use in a medieval English village. The peasants don't care about numeracy or crazy ideas, they want somebody who can slaughter a pig or plough a field. He has great difficulty communicating with the locals. Have a look at Shakespeare or Chaucer's English, and ...


96

Honestly the 'modern' military theory that would give Lord Gary the biggest advantage would be modern attitudes towards hygiene. It was extremely common in the time period you're talking about for a force to lose more troops to dysentery and other diseases than they lost in actual combat. By taking a very firm attitude towards latrine maintenance and ...


92

Let's consider a real historical example Let's fix the historical period to the 14th century, and let's say that "language 1" is French and "language 2" is Romanian. Both French and Romanian are descended from Latin (which is thus "language 0"), and in the 14th century, they had had no contact for about 1000 years. No 14th century Frenchman spoke Romanian, ...


86

Yes it's possible. How? The mask body would be made out of leather. In order to make it airtight I would take one layer of leather, then a layer of pitch (which was also used to seal ships) and another layer of leather. With leather straps you could fix this mask to the head. You could even fit glasses in there - medieval glass was not as good as today's ...


79

First off, repopulation. There are two possibilities - either the elves have a birth rate similar to humans or they have a birth rate vastly reduced to match their lifespan. In the former case, the elves would become vastly overpopulated very, very quickly, with a death rate that's negligible next to their birth rate. Such a species could conceivably become ...


69

The simplest solution is that in both population you have some rare few scholars who speak language 0 and can communicate in this language, even though they do not actually speak each others' modern day language 1 or 2. This is basically how political and scientific discourse was kept alive in the middle ages in most parts of Europe where Latin became the ...


55

To quote Miguel Valdespino on Quora about using them in combat... Chainsaws make poor weapons. While they cause a lot of damage to the enemy, they suffer many problems as weapons. They are poorly balanced for fighting and very heavy. They require fuel or power to operate. They are noisy. A mistake can severely damage the wielder. ...


55

Almost impossible. Issues: Production Production is going to be expensive. Either the cards are drawn by hand, or you have to produce some plates for every design to print them (and in this last case, forget about colours). You will not get those cards on nice, plastified cards, but in more fragile (and susceptible to wear and tear) paper or parchment (...


52

How about this? The stone goes into a church/temple/palace. The accused in any trial has the right to demand a Trial by Stone instead of the usual legal process, but only before that process starts. The accused will be transported to the stone. This can be a slow and degrading route at the king's expense (chain gang) or a faster one paid for by the ...


52

Hate to say it varies, but...it varies. Start with this question, just because it's a wealth of info and tangentially related.: In a medieval setting, how far apart should towns be? Which is all about how far apart towns should be. As to inns, you'll want to keep in mind that not all inns were...official inns. Some of them were homes. You'd pass by a ...


51

This really should be a comment to Pavel's excellent answer, but I'm afraid I don't have the reputation to add a comment. Given the sad story of Ignaz Semmelweis, it's pretty unlikely anybody would even listen to your newfangled ideas about the importance of hygiene. His flash of insight was quite literally that it would be advisable for doctors to wash ...


47

The real problem is that the stone does not actually force you to speak truth. So when you speak a half-truth or a misleading truth it will still identify it as a lie. A clever person could still work their way through this by only saying things intended to mislead or deceive. The listener would still have to interpret which parts are a lie. For example, ...


47

It depends on the pistol The 19th century spans a number of revolutions in firearms including percussion caps, revolvers, cartridges, smokeless powder, and semi-automatic pistols. It spans everything from a single shot, muzzle loading, flintlock pistol using black powder... To a recognizably modern cartridge revolver like the iconic Colt Single Action Army ...


45

Depends on how he plays his cards. The medieval world was disgusting, diseased and woefully violent. Being used to the egalitarian principles of modern times, he would treat the nobles as equals, which might result in beheading or in the nobles assuming they're dealing with a fellow noble. If he can't speak the (for him) archaic local language well (might ...


45

"Realistically" is a pretty broad spectrum of interest for us here at Worldbuilding LLC. The condition of a standard, non-living wood treasure chest over time is naturally affected by many factors, a few keys of which are the following: The type of wood used: some woods are very soft and prone to rot no matter what while others are hard & dense and ...


43

The material property we'll want to concern ourselves here is Toughness. This value denotes a material's resistance to fracturing. A typical diamond has a toughness value of 2.0 KIc, which is greater than most stones or rocks, and similar to ceramics. Steel, on the other hand, has a value of 50 KIc, and many metals have similarly high values compared to ...


43

Shopkeepers did not display their goods to nearly the same extent as modern shops. Plate glass is a very modern invention, and even small panes of glass were expensive. Shops had signs outside that told you what they sold. Frequently these would have pictures rather than writing, since many people were illiterate. You would look for a shop that sold the ...


43

No Megaladon is not fundamentally a more fearsome or ferocious beast than a sperm whale, which is also carnivorous, of similar size, probably smarter, and has as documented capability to sink 240 ton sailing vessels. Humans have hunted sperm whales, probably since pre-history. Even to the modern day, they do it by jumping off a boat and stabbing them with ...


39

For the sake of this answer, I will be assuming that by "castles" you mean late medieval/early Renaissance pre-gunpowder fortifications that were used for habitation as well as defense. I was also originally going to split this answer into two parts, depending on how difficult these creatures would be to kill or wound, but after some consideration, I ...


37

Would a chainsaw be a practical weapon in the medieval ages? Hahahaha ... oh, wait. You're serious. No, they would not be at all practical or effective. I mean .. they might scare some people, but have you ever used one? They would not be anyone's weapon of choice. How well would it do against swords and shields? Terribly. Block with the shield, stab ...


36

First of all, let's start with a rough classification of the people living in the palace: The gentlepersons for the use of whom the palace is run. The question gives their number as one hundred. The personal servants of the gentlepersons, of appropriate sex -- grooms for the gentlemen, maids for the gentlewomen. They number at least as many, but some of the ...


34

Underground fortifications are very defensible, far more so than any above-ground fortification. However, the main reason that they are rare is the time and expense in excavating them, amongst other reasons. Assuming a medieval environment with flying mounts in common military use, underground fortifications make a lot of sense, and their added defensive ...


34

Say who the curse is directed to as a part of the curse, for example let's say you curse someone to step on a thousand Legos (or anything else, this is just a random and amusing example), you could shout May you be cursed to step on a thousand Legos! and anyone who hears it is now cursed, but you could include their name or some other way of identifying ...


33

He would bring bacterias and viruses, that haven't evolved yet with him and after people around him start getting sick and die, they would realize he is the devil and would burn him at a stake.


33

There is a book that is commonly referenced for medieval life questions called Life in a Medieval Village by Frances and Joseph Gies. If you're interested in realism you should be able to draw a lot of inspiration from it. The book focuses on a English village called Elton around the 13th century. Among the manorial court records there are references to ...


32

The main thing everyone is overlooking is economy of scale. You've only got one truth stone, but justice needs to happen all over the country. If you are rich and noble you will probably be able to appeal to visit the Final Court (where the truth stone resides). If you are poor and common and guilty you may try to appeal in the hopes that it gives you more ...


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