19

boolean permanent = true It seems a rather trivial question. You've made something that can shape, colour and add properties (flex, conductivity, etc.) to itself to your desire. How difficult would the next step be that you consider an object finished or permanent and the fog to obey? Probably you barely need to spare the thought. Only if you would actively ...


8

With the weapons of the period I think the most immediate benefit would be removing one the biggest shortcomings of crossbows, putting them on the same level with bows when it comes to cadence of fire: Later crossbows (sometimes referred to as arbalests), utilizing all-steel prods, were able to achieve power close (and sometime superior) to longbows, but ...


6

For ranged weapons The quality of steel in the 800-1000AD range was generally not good enough to make an arbalest, and designing a longbow able to take much more than a 100lb draw is not easy (see comments for more details). Multi-arm or slat laminated arm crossbows have also been suggested, but are grossly unreliable and not invented until after 1000AD. ...


6

Hacking Given that the fog is remotely controlled, it will be very susceptible to hacking. You might wake up one morning to find that a prankster has turned your bed into a skip, complete with garbage. Or your house might now be in the middle of the street and look like a Swiss chalet complete with snow but no bathroom. Creativity As in virtual worlds, some ...


4

We have tons of machinery which has the very same "issue" when they are not used: printers, computers, cars, ships, rockets. Basically everything! In your case the utility fog will still need to have a power supply to stay idle. If that power supply happens to be a RF source, the emitter of the can be configured in such a way that the power supply ...


4

Fog does not stay together. Like a robot servant who turns off the light when you leave the room, the utility fog would slump into inert particles when not needed. Everything in the room made of fog would dissipate into drifts on the floor. What would be left would be a non-fog AI - some Alexa like Argus entity which watches everything and knows where its ...


3

It sounds to me like the Wingjaws contain something that emits a fundamental particle which greatly suppresses the mass of anything within a short range. You can jump higher because the armor has no mass and you can leave it hanging in air for the same reason. (The effect must not be absolute, or it would float upward to make way for the greater mass of ...


3

The problem with making an all-plastic gun to use anything resembling conventional ammunition (say, polymer-cased rounds) is material strength. As far as I'm aware, there are no plastics available that can withstand momentary stresses due to 25,000 to 40,000 psi (appr. 1800 to 2700 bar) from firing a round. Now, if one could obtain carbon nanotube fiber in ...


3

I would say the fog stays together using magnetic flux pinning. This link explains the phenomenon: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flux_pinning Now I don't know all the equations and stuff, because I'm but a layman but in principle it's when a superconductor gets enveloped in a magnetic field it shields it from all other magnetic fields and causes a ...


3

I think you're clearest on the effects of wingjaw intincted armour, and the advantages are fairly obvious: lighter armour = greater ease of motion & less fatigue But let's not forget that there are two components to the iron thus produced. First, and of greatest import, is the iron itself. If your target society doesn't really understand iron well or ...


2

It'd be terrible for armor. As you say, it adds additional force to anything that hits it. Which means that if you were wearing a helmet made of it, and someone hit you in the head, your armor would be amplifying their blow that much more. The blow might not penetrate the helmet, but that doesn't matter if you have a concussion or a broken neck. With a ...


2

I point out that elephants are a lot stronger than 6 times human strength, and in Asia war elephants have been fitted with blades attached to their tusks. War elephants have also been trained to use w swords with their trunks. And some war elephants have been trained to pick up large iron chains and swing them at enemy soldiers. So if versions of hand ...


1

It seems that it can be made In 2012, the U.S.-based team Defense Distributed disclosed plans to design a working plastic gun that could be downloaded and reproduced by anybody with a 3D printer. Defense Distributed has also designed a 3D printable AR-15 type rifle lower receiver (capable of lasting more than 650 rounds) and a variety of magazines.


1

If it is truly indestructible, then YES! If your silk is really indestructible, then a little bit of molten-metal forging will not bother it at all. So make fiberglass armor out of it. Except, don't use glass fibers, use the silk. And don't use silly resin, use the hardest steel you can lay your hands on. !!not the toughest, you want hard!! If you have the ...


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