New answers tagged

2

Build up from Tyranny There are superhumans among us now. A tiny number of people, on paper, own (directly or indirectly) most everything. These could split into empires and armies clashing, suppressing, and ruling by force. Much like an overpowered superhero might. But they don't. Why? These super humans are satisfied that concerns of great urgency to them ...


3

It is one of those "every answer is valid" questions. Should it be illegal to shot people for trespassing? Should it be illegal to stone women for being unfaithful? Should it be illegal to cut arms form stealing? Should it be illegal for people of "frowned upon" sexuality be castrated? Should it be illegal to perform euthanasia at willing ...


2

Carrying out any medical procedure on someone without their consent is going to be illegal. The only question is how serious an offence it is compared to causing physical injury.


3

This is a very difficult question to answer. Personally, I'm of the belief that the whole field of 'mind magic' inherently aligns itself with "evil", especially since its most powerful applications can easily manipulate someone's free will, ability to consent, and identity even as a side-effect. It's widely accepted that memories make us who we are ...


5

As with so many things, the line is likely to be drawn at consent. Altering someone's memories with their consent is likely to be legal, outside of perhaps a few areas which are not allowed to be removed. (Although it's surely not the best example, the first to mind is that erasing someone's memory of time in prison or other legal penalties would likely be ...


4

Technology with use and abuse potential will be regulated. It will first be used in cutting-edge labs, perhaps supervised by university ethics committees. Next, prototype clinical trials, perhaps as laws rather than one-off decisions. By the time it reaches the criminal market, the industry will be established. Imagine some trauma victim who gets counseling ...


0

Themis. There is a super whose power is to be the justice system. She is extremely old but not aged in appearance. She may be immortal. She has a depth of understanding beyond that of normal people and supers both and her gift is the gift of fairness. And she is blind. Judicial matters involving supers (and sometimes those not) are brought before Justice....


4

No one super who is drastically more powerful than anyone else The way human society tends to "work" is that people are mostly safe because physically humans beings are more or less equal within a margin of error. Yes, some people are stronger than others, but in a straight-up fight stripped of followers and political power even the most brutal ...


0

Many of the forms of banned executions in the US are based on the horrific nature of failed executions. In a world where super-human survival is more common, US law would likely adapt to make a death sentence as guaranteed as possible since botched executions are a typical consideration for what makes one method cruel vs another. So, instead of more ...


1

Am currently writing a story centered on it. I prefer to call this technology Brain Computer Interface (BCI) or brain-machine interface (BMI) rather than Direct Neural Link exactly to point out that this technology is NOT direct. You do not connect directly to the network. First of all current real studies have pointed out the difficulty of signal processing....


3

1) Use Application specific chip sets (think that is the correct name) Your cybernetic system would contain a series of 'chips' specifically designed to perform one (or a specific set of tasks) fixed at the time of fabrication. Critically the programming in these chip sets cannot be changed post production (excepting perhaps in situations where the person ...


3

Security overdrive One way to keep your brain link secure is to hire and maintain a group of expert hackers who are constantly hacking an making fixes for possible intrusions. This is good for high profile people since this means there are team standing by for your security, and good for normal people since they get great security. The company that make this ...


2

The Constitution prohibits cruel executions The Eighth Amendment to the US Constitution prohibits torture: "Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted." The courts are not fans of spectacle executions, and for good reason. In 1972's Furman v. Georgia, the Supreme Court temporarily ...


2

If you have a more fascistic, militaristic government (it sounds like you might), there's no reason that any number of inhumane sentences wouldn't be viewed as believable. Firing squad is still available in the US right now, so there's no reason that wouldn't believable. Hanging and decapitation both have histories of botched executions being incredibly ...


0

Death by organ harvest. Outre and not done, and so without precedent that might contaminate your story. But sensible enough and so good for a fiction. Sentenced must choose this method among (many) others. Those choosing this method might do so because they want to pay debt to society. Less wasteful. What happens to the people who get her regeneration-...


3

How do we prevent people from killing each other with other lethal methods we walk around with every day, like cars, power tools, or drain cleaner? Investigation and forensics. You make it likely enough to get caught that most people don't want to take the chance. Yes, it's possible to use J. Random Computer to hack J. Random Citizen's cybernetic implants in ...


3

Take out the brain interface from the question and it ceases being a worldbuilding question to become a question more fit for security.se. With or without the brain interface, the question boils down to: How do we keep a psychopath with a lab top from hacking Because the motive and the target are irrelevant. And the only correct answer is that you can't. ...


Top 50 recent answers are included