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5

A picture is worth a thousand words... ...and a species that begins by communicating with pictures would likely never stop. Humans developed writing to imitate the sounds we use to communicate. When we talk, we talk in sequence, placing one simple concept after another. We do this because, lacking chromatophores, we are physically incapable of producing ...


0

If I understand correctly you are asking about two things. First would your world contain more than one language? The second point I'm not exactly sure what do you mean. Anyway the first one we can think about. It depends. If you want to have a real diverse world that simulates the complexity of the real world then obviously you have to include different ...


8

This problem was solved three thousand years ago. Homer, in his Iliad and Odyssey, had to decide what to do with the Trojans, the Phaeacians, the Lotus-Eaters, and other exotic aliens. He solved the problem in the simplest way possible: everybody speaks Greek. The readers (or, rather, in that time, the listeners) of course understood that in real life the ...


2

Only add complexity if it will add something to your readers' experience. They can add a lot. Tolkien used languages brilliantly to express the cultural richness of his world. But using one language will greatly simplify things and keep the plot moving without the need for translators and translation all the time. What would the benefit be?


1

Welcome to the forum. It is important when asking questions here to try to keep them well focused, but I will try to answer. If your world had a recent populating event such as a colonization spacecraft landing then it would seem likely they would use just one language. If you are taking about a worldwide civilization that has grown u over millennia then ...


1

Nice question! Meet Koko A study was carried out teaching a chimpanzee sign language. She was able to describe new items. Like a thermos was "hot" +"bottle". Even able to pass the sign language to other chimps!!! So there you have it. Human <-> chimp inter species communication without sound. Using different hand structure yet it was possible.


1

You are writing. Have them write too. You are writing a story. Having your aliens communicate with written messages lets you leverage your own written format. Instead of you writing "Grok started grunting 'bad'" you can write that Grok writes on his board BAD BAD TAT BAD! then taps the words with his finger so hard he breaks the board. He has several ...


4

The simplest answer that can be given to this is that at a minimum, alien species will need some form of vocal chords that vibrate over an airflow to generate the sound, and some form of cavity past those cords that can be dynamically shaped to form the sounds out of those vibrations that we can interpret as speech. In humans, that is the throat, mouth and ...


9

You're describing Hangul (the writing system for the Korean language) but there are issues. Hangul is a really cool writing system because it was designed from the ground up by the best linguists of the day at the request of the emperor of the Korean peninsula to solve very similar problems to the ones you describe. It's the ultimate nerd's writing system ...


1

So far no one has mentioned a modulated stream. Consider having two states - off and on. Perhaps the off state is "o" and the on state is "u". You can change the length and or volume of the on state and get just about any sound that you want with the caveat that you will hear an overtone squall. In fact the way humans speak is that we produce a carrier ...


3

It could function, but how would it evolve? A two-sound language is basically binary and is perfectly capable of transmitting arbitrary amounts of information. However, unless the species was constructed artificially or they voluntarily adopted this system after evolving a culture, it seems unlikely that such a species would ever evolve the ability to talk ...


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Other have covered the binary issue pretty well. Remember though that vocal communication, as in humans, is supplemented by many other forms: while the old line about only 20% of communication being verbal is a misunderstanding, the aliens may have even more developed use of gesture, tone, expression etc. (Or semaphore: "Cathy!!") And if their vocal ...


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Take a look a Huffman encoding (wikipedia link)-- it's a form of compression that uses shorter binary sequences for more common symbols. Also consider that all humans have huge brain structures just for our language. I can't see this limitation being a huge problem.


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Very feasible indead. But the written language needn't be binary. Indeed the letter B could stand for the sequence of sounds uuuouu. (I assume you are including spaces, or pauses? Or you could have s space be a special sequence say ououououououo. ) If the sounds are continuous with no spaces you might need a special sequence to indicate the start of a ...


-1

How to create a language family? You don't, societies, social interactions, and even individuals do this over largish periods of time. Languages are practical things, developed for the most part in complete disregard of literature and academia. The best you can do is make a language up, and then mash it around a bit so you have dialects and voila, pretend ...


7

Start with the Wikipedia article on language change, follow the links and consider the bibliography. Do read the Wikipedia article on comparative linguistics and historical linguistics. Remember that what you are trying to do is run the comparative method in reverse in order to project the future evolution of a language. Some freely available books on the ...


9

This is fairly easy. With tri-state it's even easier, but for now let's consider just using a click or silence (a la pure binary: 00101010). The answer is a lot and as quick as their memory can handle. Let's lay some ground theory: There are a small set of "proto verbs" (Incorrect terminology so I'm having trouble sourcing this), of quantity less than 30, ...


0

Chinese and Japanese (and other such a languages) have an interesting pronunciation structure: each syllable has a certain "timeframe" and those syllables are pronounced in a rhythm. There are "long" ("two-frame") syllables and "short" ("half-frame") ones, but the timing of "frame" should be kept. These languages have tens of syllables. But the proposed ...


11

It is essentially a binary language, just like what machines use. Unless they never stop vocalising, it isn't really binary as you have O, U and silence. Binary signals just have high and low, or on and off. Tri-state stuff is distinguished from plain old binary. How can each word be differentiated without any pauses between words? So, study of spoken ...


4

Latin written with scripta continua had words without spaces. I have observed that some modern Italian speakers also string their words together without spaces except when they need to breathe. The key I think it to recognize words as such as soon as they are spoken and mentally file each one as you hear it and get ready for the next. The other thing ...


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