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2

Many underwater animals, from invertebrates to catfish, use stridulation to produce sound. Corixids, aquatic insects also known as water boatmen, use various pulse patterns to communicate, not unlike crickets. Sound carries differently underwater than in the air (notably it moves faster and travels further) but there's no reason why a sea creature couldn't ...


2

It has been tried before. Esperanto was an artificial language created in 1887. Its purpose was to promote world peace by having a universal second language. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esperanto


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Inevitable XKCD: People have of course tried this sort of thing in the past... there are no shortages of old conlangs with utopian fantasies attached. Esperanto is perhaps the classic, which has a whole raft of issues, some or more of which have contributed to its failure to take over the world. There are older, weirder things like Volapük, and no shortage ...


3

It is up to you, but note that the definition of 'human' has been getting broader over time I think once you enter a technologically advanced world such as in the question, the definition of human would only really be 'a thinking, conscious being', and even that is pushing it. Basically, 'humans' as we take it now would be the exception rather than the ...


3

Information density vs Speed of information Processing While paper offers higher information density (per grams) knots and quipu could offer support for faster information processing than paper: more advanced ways of modelling information (though this could do with a bit of hand waving) but a recent branch of mathematics known as knot theory which would ...


5

In order to flesh out your advanced Inca empire, you might want to research three subjects: Ada Lovelace, tree structuring, and the Yupana. Ada Lovelace. She was the first person to realize and write down the idea that the Babbage analytical engine was suitable for recording and manipulating textual data like Shakespeare's plays. She described a kind of ...


6

I haven't tried using it, but quipu looks like a horribly slow way to record a message. Unless the old way of doing things was enforced with a hideous fanaticism, I can't see the Aztec scribes using quipu for very long once they saw how quickly a Spaniard could dash off a message with ink and paper. This is most especially important in a military situation; ...


7

It seems to me like the natural way to "read" the knots in Quipu would be with the fingers which puts me in mind of Braille. As other posters have mentioned the fundamental problems with Quipu are information density and reproducibility. These are the problems your Alternative Inca will have to solve but coming from a background with a tactile alphabet they ...


28

Density The problem with quipu is the information density. We don't know exactly how much literal information can contain a quipu, because we can't decipher the literal quipu yet. This books states: Alothether 46 different items of information were kept on this recording device no larger than an ordinary kitchen mop. In this case, the author is talking ...


6

Awful information density As cyrus said in his answer, you can't mass produce anything with this system. but there is another problem: information density. Even if we stick with numbers, you need a new rope for each 3 digits. 203 956 for example would need 2 little ropes. And it's quite simple as there are only three types of knots, one for the hundreds, ...


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You'd need the weaving equivalent of a printing press The printing press revolutionized "writing" and the spread of knowledge on paper. You no longer needed trained scribes laboring on each page of a book to copy it. This allowed literacy to spread across the population (eventually). I expect that your Incas could make do with hand-knotted documents for ...


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Cloud bird or the-cloud-that-moves. They would not know that it was made of metal if they only saw it in the sky and had no other knowledge of it, and it’s height would clearly be greater than that of any other bird they saw


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You said you're against the idea of calling it a metal bird, but are there any other things the characters are aware of that fly around in the sky? If they are describing the plane to someone, they are trying to relate it to something the other person is familiar with Birds being the obvious "cliche" choice is a good answer. Obvious is good so the other ...


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