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44

You will likely have an easier time if you pick a Slavic language that uses a Roman alphabet. Like Czech or Slovak (which are very similar to each other). Then you don't have to deal with the unknown alphabet and words that are more removed from Latin/etc. Take Slovakia. It's got some pretty straight-forward place name conventions. I do a lot of genealogy ...


27

Counter-intuitively, the way I would go about that would be to construct your own simplistic conlang with Slavic flavour. First, Slavic isn't a single language, there are three major subgroups inside of it, and multiple languages, with phonetical and grammatical nuances of their own. Translating stuff to one language through Google Translate will give you ...


24

I believe you have two options here 1) make up something generally Slavic sounding 2) get a native speaker to help you out. As a Czech I see way to much weirdness already in the suggestions here on this page only (e.g. Novyruska or Novyruskia absolutely cannot work, Russia is feminine and novy is masculine, you need nová/novaya/depends on specific language,...


7

Lift them from real places. Here is a map of medieval Kievan Rus from Wikipedia. https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/db/Principalities_of_Kievan_Rus%27_%281054-1132%29.jpg\ Good names: Halych, Kiev, Volyn, Smolensk, Polotsk. Also "Chud", which was a surprise to me. You could get names like this off of other maps of Slavic areas. Now ...


7

As Cyn already suggested, many names are related to the river it is close to. You can use the list below to sythesize your own names and then let them checked to avoid names that just sound slavic but does not make any sense in any slavic language. Something like "Your eyes September" ->(cz) Tvoje oči Září -> "Your eyes shine." The cities here got their ...


6

How to make Slavic names? Take the thing as it is. For example a mountain that is black slopes or is overgrown with dark forest, almost black. Call it just that "Black mountain". Černá Hora in Czech or Crna Gora in Montenegrin. Swap G for H and as you wish. Mash words together. So a "New City" translated to Slavic would be Novi Grad, after two changes it's ...


5

Talking of Russian: I think they adapted Game of thrones locations just brilliantly. Like there is a spot "Black Waters", straightforward translation of which would be "Chornyie Vody" or singular "Chornaya Voda", which might be more readable for you. But they've chosen "Chernovodnaya". A single word! Furthermore, it's an adjective, not a noun. Very authentic ...


4

If you look to the New World, geographic names in new settlements are usually quite uninventive. Apart from names inherited from the original inhabitants, the colonists tended to name their settlements the same thing as their place of origin (Paris, Texas), optionally adding "New" in front of it (New York, New Amsterdam, Nova Scotia), the same which also ...


4

This is to support the answer by idrougge: "geographic names in new settlements are usually quite uninventive." I live in Australia, which was settled mostly by people from Britain. Of course, in Australia there were already Aboriginal people, and quite a few place names derive from local Aboriginal languages (often as mis-heard by British settlers). I don't ...


3

I may suggest composing placenames using the most productive Slavic suffixes. There are a number of groups of such suffixes: -ov/-ova/-ovo/-ove/-ev... (Krakow, Kiev, Rostov being the live examples) -sk/-ska/-sko/-ske/-skoe/-skoye... (Hlinske, Smolensk, Polotsk) -ts/-tsy/-tsi/-tse... (Chernivtsi, Kamianets, Katowice in Polish spelling) -ka/-ki/-nia/-nik... (...


3

What is a Slavic name? Is, for example, Sankt Peterburg a Slavic name? After all, it's a very large city in Russia and it used to be capital city of the Russian Empire. But the name is actually made of one Latin, one Greek and one Germanic component; the more Slavic equivalent is Petrograd (still has a Greek component, but Petr it's more Slavicized than ...


1

As usual for this type of questions, the usual disclaimer. The way you would go about creating a language depends severely on the purpose you want to put it to. If your goal is to just put a couple of alien-sounding words in a work of fiction, you can just invent them as you go along. If you want a conlang to communicate in, you can go by the frequency list -...


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