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12 votes
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How possible is a habitable, liquid ocean-planet at temperatures below 0°C?

Similar to the other answers, yes there are lots of liquids that melt below freezing and at a pressure of 1 atmosphere. Liquid Possibilities Butane and Pentane You said that your planet had ...
Neil Iyer's user avatar
  • 1,543
12 votes

Could Jupiter-like planet be able to radiate energy to sustain life on satellite?

Talking about Jupiter like a failed star can be somewhat misleading. However, it is true that Jupiter radiates more heat than what it receives from the Sun. Based on this paper Jupiter emits around 7....
L.Dutch's user avatar
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11 votes
Accepted

What atmospheric composition would this planet need for an avg. temperature of 50 Celsius?

It takes a lot of calculations to determine the gases necessary to achieve a particular greenhouse effect, and there are choices involved that a WB SE answer cannot make for you, such as the ...
Monty Wild's user avatar
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10 votes

How possible is a habitable, liquid ocean-planet at temperatures below 0°C?

The lower the atmospheric pressure, the lower the temperature at which water boils and becomes water vapor. At a low enough atmospheric pressure liquid water is not possible since water will be either ...
M. A. Golding's user avatar
10 votes

Could Jupiter-like planet be able to radiate energy to sustain life on satellite?

Geothermal energy might do it from tidal forces. This can heat up a moon a lot, probably enough to sustain life(just look at the volcanos on Io). Possibly any life might also take advantage of the ...
Bubbles's user avatar
  • 1,606
9 votes

Is this ocean-planet stable?

Pure ethanol and pure water are miscible--ethanol and salt water are not. So you would not have an ocean of alcoholic salty water--you'd have an ocean of salt water with a separate layer of ethanol ...
Logan R. Kearsley's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

Could a cold-cored planet be protected by a hot-cored moon?

The moon magnetic field would protect the moon from the flow of charged particles coming from the star. Only in certain configuration of the moon - planet - star the moon could incidentally shield a ...
L.Dutch's user avatar
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6 votes
Accepted

Is this ocean-planet stable?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supercooling It could lead to intersting pehenomena though.. were at the poles, supercooled ice structures could appear. Imagine a world, were the smallest turbulance can ...
Pica's user avatar
  • 4,676
6 votes

Would an increase in star density affect the "Goldilocks Zone"?

The answer in this particular case is no, because even 20,000 light-years closer to the center of the galaxy the distance between stars is fairly large. Much of the stellar number density in the Milky ...
HDE 226868's user avatar
  • 101k
6 votes

How possible is a habitable, liquid ocean-planet at temperatures below 0°C?

There are many substances which are liquid below 0°C (and 1 atm pressure): methane (melts at −182 °C, boils at −161.5 °C), methanol (melts at −97.6 °C) and ethanol (melts at −114 °C) are just three ...
L.Dutch's user avatar
  • 291k
5 votes

Can a planet with rings support life?

Life on Earth has evolved over something like 4 billion years. Saturn's rings probably will last for another 300 million years. As you get closer in to the sun, the three-way gravitational ...
Richard Kirk's user avatar
  • 10.1k
5 votes

How far from a habitable planet must a red giant star be to not seriously affect it?

In a binary system where the stars are separated by 100 Astronomical Units (AU), the effect of a red giant on a planet circling a smaller star (like F, G, K, M class) would probably be minimal. ...
cconsta1's user avatar
  • 1,281
5 votes

How to protect a water planet within a water ring of a quasar from radiation?

The simplest solution would be to move the planet further away, where water vapor will be more abundant and gas will naturally shield it from radiation. But first let's talk about the neighborhood the ...
HDE 226868's user avatar
  • 101k
5 votes

Can a Super-Earth have a large moon?

Yes Do you need a simple proof? You just need to know two concepts beforehand : A super-Earth is different from Earth by... Well, being super. It's heavier than Earth, and lighter than gas giants. ...
Tortliena - inactive's user avatar
4 votes

Could humans live on a cylindrical celestial body?

As mentioned, this is not actually a planet, but let's pretend. One scenario would be a perfectly cylindrical object, created by some ancient race, billions of years ago. Let's presume that the ...
Robert Rapplean's user avatar
4 votes

How to increase Jupiter’s reflectivity?

Copy Venus. It shines so bright because its SO2 and H2SO4 rich clouds do a great job at reflecting back solar light. Hydrogen is readily available on Jupiter, sulphur and oxygen though in traces ...
L.Dutch's user avatar
  • 291k
3 votes

What is the albedo of a habitable planet?

Simple answer: Somewhere around 0.3 is good. Longer answer: It really depends on greenhouse effect. The following is an equation for surface temperature from https://web.archive.org/web/20210605120431/...
Valitenci's user avatar
  • 508
3 votes

What atmospheric composition would this planet need for an avg. temperature of 50 Celsius?

This is trickier than it sounds. It isn't a "simple" matter of picking a CO2 level somewhere in crazyland like 3 or 4 kPa of CO2 or something because CO2 is removed by the carbon-silicate ...
Pds314's user avatar
  • 69
3 votes

How to protect a water planet within a water ring of a quasar from radiation?

The planet will be all in one piece , but life will be shizzled Sure, quasars emit b*ttloads of gamma rays. Like if you were to stand near an average quasar, you could receive a radiation dose ...
Alastor's user avatar
  • 3,422
3 votes

Would an increase in star density affect the "Goldilocks Zone"?

Increasing or decreasing density of stars in space should have little effect on habitability of planets until the stellar density gets very large. A star will generally be surrounded by stars in all ...
M. A. Golding's user avatar
3 votes

How much Methane could reasonably exist on a world with 6% (60,000 ppm) Oxygen in the atmosphere?

Trace gas. Combustion is irrelevant here as Starfish Prime points out. Photodissociation of methane may be significant but we can probably ignore it to get an upper bound based solely on the oxygen. ...
g s's user avatar
  • 7,529
2 votes

How possible is a habitable, liquid ocean-planet at temperatures below 0°C?

You say it doesn't have to be an ocean of water, but... if you want an atmosphere with oxygen and an ocean that won't produce toxic-to-humans vapors, you really don't have a lot of options. It has to ...
Logan R. Kearsley's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

Could humans live on a cylindrical celestial body?

A 'planet' is generally understood to be a natural body. The IAU distinguishes planets from planetoids and planetesimals by their round shape and that they have swept their orbit clean. This ...
Richard Kirk's user avatar
  • 10.1k
2 votes

Can a Super-Earth have a large moon?

There are two types of natural satellites or moons in our solar system. Regular moons formed in orbit around their planets much like planets formed in orbit around the Sun. Irregular moons formed ...
M. A. Golding's user avatar
2 votes

Causes of extreme seasons on an Earth-like planet such that humans need to migrate

Make it a twin sun system, where the second smaller sun orbits in a high curve, orthogonal to the ecliptic https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecliptic. Its moderate on the north side, until the 2nd sun ...
Pica's user avatar
  • 4,676
2 votes

Could a cold-cored planet be protected by a hot-cored moon?

The sunward section of the Earth magnetic field is about 64,000 kilometers thick; the side facing away from the sun is 1,300,000 kilometers thick. The moon is 400,000 kilometers away from earth, so ...
George Iron's user avatar
2 votes

Can a planet with rings support life?

Rings usually form when a smaller body disintegrates while in orbit around a larger one. This can either happen because of an impact (it is possible that after the impact which led to the formation of ...
L.Dutch's user avatar
  • 291k
2 votes

Causes of extreme seasons on an Earth-like planet such that humans need to migrate

The seasons on Earth are due to the tilt of the axis of rotation. The larger the tilt, the larger the seasonal difference. So, tilt the axis more. A big problem with this type of change is the need ...
David R's user avatar
  • 5,895
2 votes

Precipitation on an outer exomoon heated by tidal heating

I'm inclined to think, because altitudinal cooling will be a thing, (in fact more of a thing since, for all intents and purposes, all the heat will be from the ground up) that precipitation will be ...
Ash's user avatar
  • 45.6k
2 votes

Precipitation on an outer exomoon heated by tidal heating

This is going to depend on some other factors, but the boring answer is you can decide, because planets are strange and bizarre and the tiniest little changes can lead to enormous effects. My followup ...
Rexotec's user avatar
  • 735

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