New answers tagged

2

Since you need to do some kind of surgery; the easy way is government will then just keep track of the surgeries that occurred and hunt down illegal non-recorded surgeries.


3

To give it a more Sci-Fi feeling but keeping the roots in reality I would go for brainwaves scanning. Currently there are studies showing that such waves could be unique for each individual (https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7435286). In order for this to work we will have to assume that the wave pattern will be unique to the “consciousness” transferred ...


0

The government would be able to keep track of someone's identity by implanting people with RFID chips. The RFID chips would be able to identify and track the host , if someones body is "stolen" they would just simply have to prove their identity by visiting local police station and provide passwords , ID numbers and certain personal information. The host of ...


0

Government would control the process and you would register each time. For backyard swaps they would be vigorously hunted down with a death penalty and a reward for informers.


5

Once this superscience/technology becomes commonplace identification will be completely replaced by non-physical measures. Already nowadays we have a realm where your physical body is meaningless and identification happens only based on non-physical codes: the internet uses passwords, names & emails to keep track of who is who. Once bodies are ...


2

In a world with multiple sapient humanoid species, humans probably wouldn't be outright dominant. In nature when you have multiple similar species coexisting together, they usually do so because they occupy slightly different niches from one another. This actually happened with humans, about 3 million years ago you had Ardipithecus adapted for living in ...


2

Since you're creating the other races and give them the traits you want, you might want to consider, aside from the Jack of All Trades trope, another one which I've seen used from time to time: humans, from the point of view of other races, are unpredictable. You might posit that, with individual exceptions, your other races might have defining behaviours, ...


1

A trench wider than the giant's stride and with the inside surrounded with a tripping hazard with a collapsible drawbridge and covered in net. "Fun" fact. Elephants can't jump. They're too massive. Tripping is potentially fatal for an elephant. A biologist once described it to me this way, "If a mouse, a human, and an elephant jumped off a twenty story ...


2

Politics: Divide and Conquer Since they live in semi-nomadic tribes, I imagine that some of the tribes... don't get along. Make a deal with the tribe(s) you find to be the least offensive. Woo them with food and drink. Have them go after the other tribes, and capture them for you. Then, once all the allied giants have captured all of the enemy giants, ...


7

With skin that thick they've got no manual dexterity. Win them over with the sort of goods than can only be produced with nimble fingers -- fine-woven cloth, tools, gadgets -- and build a trading economy that binds them closely to your interests.


9

how big their baby is ? i think a method to tame elephant can be use here, basically catch the infant put them in chain or shackle and tame them or brainwash them in the process. when they grow they probably wont even realize that they can remove the shackle easily and can be manipulate easily. here some copy paste from http://www.stevescottsite.com/how-...


12

Drugs Giants get hooked on drugs more readily than humans due to a neurological quirk, although you still need a pretty big dose. So you get your giants addicted to opium, which you import from a separate region as to prevent them from just taking it from you. Giants have a very hard time beating addictions because they’re so used to always getting their ...


31

Food. Animals that big need a lot of calories. Maybe giants eat huge quantities of plant material like elephants. Even elephants prefer crop plants like corn and melons over grass and bark. A giant can do more work than a team of horses. Employ them to do agriculture. Pay them with funds they can use to buy the huge quantities of food and beer they ...


5

Don't capture one giant from the tribe. Instead, hire the whole tribe (they are as smart as humans). Then spend treasure and resources to flatter them, corrupt them, promote them, and win their loyalty. THAT will make you a force to be reckoned with.


7

Step One: Eliminate or Assimilate the Opposition The authority of the Dark Lord must be absolute. It is absolutely critical for any dictator or warlord to either destroy or convert any potential rivals or rebels to their cause. Your best real world parallel would be Genghis Khan, who united the Steppe Tribes through violence, marriage alliances, and shrewd ...


3

Wanderlust Why are humans found pretty much everywhere in the world? As we were developing as a species, humans were prone to walking pretty much everywhere. People would set out for the horizon and settle new lands, just because they were there. In this way humans had pretty much settled the whole globe before civilization was even a thing. In your ...


0

In the case of Spain, centuries of forced “unity” have weakened the strength/size of the separatist groups. Even the basques are assimilating to the point that most of the young can’t speak the language.


2

Apologies in advance for the fact that this answer wanders into some really ugly bits of Terran history. Borders are naturally porous. Show me a border almost anywhere, and I'll be able to find a bunch of people who've settled on the 'wrong' side of it. People wander, they fall in love, they seek employment. They come out on the wrong side of a civil war; ...


7

Humans are more social, we collect in larger groups. This may very well be the reason humans won out over neanderthal, who were larger, stronger, and tougher. Human had no physical advantages over neanderthal. But the average neanderthal tribe was around 10-30 individuals. while human bands range from 30-150. These are both controlled by how big a certain ...


9

Humans straddle the divide between r and k selected species. Let us consider evolutionary theory. http://www.bio.miami.edu/tom/courses/bil160/bil160goods/16_rKselection.html The two evolutionary "strategies" are termed r-selection, for those species that produce many "cheap" offspring and live in unstable environments and K-selection for those ...


11

We outnumber others, either by out-breeding them at some point in time or by out-killing them. Use one or combine at your leisure. The source can be technological or biological. Technological edge: Hard edge, by outkilling the others: Humans were the first who discovered how to smelt iron. While the others were still using bronze armor and swords, here ...


5

Balance, versatility, and adaptability. While humans have a large range of strengths and weaknesses, the other races are often humanoid, with one or multiple traits amplified. This comes with its own set of strengths and weaknesses on top of human ones. With humans being the in-between, we are the most balanced in any field, because we can adapt ourself in ...


5

Versatility is the first that comes to mind. It might be a different genre but in Star Trek Enterprise Admiral Forrest has this conversation with the Vulcan ambassador to Earth. Where the Ambassador admits that they fear humans because of one simple thing, their versatility. And i think this applies to humans in most Sci-Fi and fantasy. We are not the ...


1

The groups in the central country have a common cultural ideology that unites them and distinguishes them from the other three Multicultural nations generally work by having a common cultural ideology anyone can be a part of regardless of social class or ethnic group. Having a common group identity that anyone can be a part of encourages social cohesion and ...


6

How do Switzerland and Belgium exist as stable countries? The answer is a mixture of: (a) they have their own identity separate from their linguistic community identities (b) geographic governmental subdivisions that break roughly along linguistic lines (c) in Belgium, non-geographic linguistic-based governments co-exist with geographical governments (d) ...


2

The reason this centralised country exists in the first place is a secret revealed much later on. How would the races themselves explain or justify the existence of this central country in the meantime? I take this to imply that the reason this communal country exists is a secret, and should be amenable to a Big Reveal. One option would be that the ...


1

The central state is a technocracy or a magocracy. It is populated by enlightened elites who see the folly of the ways of the eternal conflict of the external states. Immigration to the central country is strictly prohibited by superior technology or magic. Invasion is unthinkable due to military superiority. The central country actively seeks and abducts ...


2

The first question is why was this fourth country settled and/or created in the first place? If this was a place where the three countries meet geographically, then this fourth country could have started as border outposts and lookout towers close together in order to watch their borders. Perhaps after a particular part in the land's history it was ...


2

The land is barren and worthless, vast deserts with few oases and little in the way of valuable goods. None of the surrounding countries want it; it's not worth the trouble to conquer, and even if you do then you end up with an over-extended border in contact with both rivals and no return on that investment. Inevitably anyone taking it ends up ...


1

The example I put forward is Canada. We have "the French" and "the English" and "the Natives." And many other people who have joined in the fray, and who are learning the game. The primary way we get along is to have certain methods of relieving the pressure. These means are sometimes officially illegal but in practice they are tolerated. To some extent. ...


2

"How could a balance between these races in a central country work, without constant internal feuding?" ... "How would they prevent any of the races trying to take over completely, adding (part of) the central country to their own territory?" Well, only one race is aggressive - let's call them "orcs". If they attack the pacifistic clairvoyants ("elves"), ...


0

Sounds a little bit like Antarctica. A lot of countries have laid claim to various parts of the continent, but IIRC, following an international treaty they have all put the claims “on ice” and agreed to only use Antarctica for scientific research purposes. So you have countries like Argentina, South Africa and Australia which would be equivalent to your ...


11

The central nation is a kingmaker in the conflict between the nations. It is not as powerful, but it can deal enough damage to ensure any country that attacks would fall to it's rivals. Perhaps magic is stronger in the location, there is a dragon / council of powerful mages defending the place, or they've got a single use WMD. Sure two nations could work ...


3

It’s a fourth, more liberal country. It governs itself. It has its own borders. Clearly it values immigration from its neighbours while they don’t seem to. It looks a lot like this place is a much more liberal ‘live and let live’ place to be than the more nationalistic triad that surrounds it. Bill it as such. People who want a multicultural society will ...


10

The central territory can be hosting an important religious item, which is worshipped by all the 3 nations. As such whoever tries to take over the central region, will openly violate the sacrality of the territory be sure to face the combined reaction of the 2 others, being in evident inferiority The above is enough to ensure an equilibrium in that region....


4

There are examples of this, and even current-day movements to secede from the Australia's Federation. It is not inconceivable for what you suggest to happen. For some while, the Principality of the Hutt River was a self-declared state within a state, inside Western Australia, with a population of around 23 - and you can even visit it as a 'tourist ...


2

Depends on the setting of your story, novel, or game. In a realistic world, forget it. Australia is a stable democracy, recognized by the rest of the world community, and it won't be possible without their consent. As for getting that consent, see what happened when President Trump suggested buying Greenland. In a suitably cinematic world, start with ...


3

False Flag The concept of a false flag attack gets abused a lot by conspiracy theorists peddling absurdities, but there are historical precedents in which bad actors have dressed or passed themselves off as a different party in order to incite greater violence. The most famous example being at the very start of WWII with the Gleiwitz Incident, in which ...


4

Option 1: Create global superpowers through warfare I'm reminded of the Cold War, in which after defeating Germany, the USA and USSR entered a period of escalating hostility. If you grew your militia to such an extent that it became dangerous - or you modified your premise to make it a third, violent country - then the ensuing war could incentivize the two ...


5

The harvesting and selling of a humaniod by-products sounds like it would fall under the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service(APHIS). More specifically The Lacy Act which, "regulates the trade of wildlife and plants and creates penalties for violations." While The Lacy Act doesn't cover bi-product distribution and ...


8

Summary, or TL;DR. Of course one is free to imagine a world where the inhabitants pay a flat tax computed as a percent of something and that's it. However, this is not at all how things worked in the Middle Ages, or at any other time, in any place of the real world. As usual on this site, I assume that by "medieval" the question assumes western European ...


0

Sure. While most constitutional monarchies extant today have relegated the monarch to a cultural icon with purely formal and ceremonial duties, a few strong monarchies, checked but not controlled by an elected body, still exist. Examples include the Kingdoms of Bhutan and Jordan, the Emirate of Kuwait, and the principalities of Monaco and Liechtenstein. In ...


0

United Arab Emirates is kind of complicated like this. You should probably just read the wikipedia article but in short it's a federation of seven different monarchies, and there's a Federal Supreme Council that votes on who the President and Vice-President should be, and there's also a Prime Minister who has a cabinet, and it just goes on and on.


3

Wow. 10% flat tax. That would be heaven for peasants. 10% was called "tithe". A tithe that had to be paid to the church, land owner, "goverment" aaaand you needed to save some seeds for the spring. They HAD to be paid. No crops this years? Tought luck, taxes need to be paid. So peasants tried to get aways with as much "paying" with money or good as much ...


4

First, in classical medieval times not everybody were paying taxes by money. Actually only about 10-15% of all people were. A peasant may never see a penny in his whole (quite short) life, paying his taxes in food supplies, in his hands and in his sons (greatly depends on country and region). Only traders, guilds and other "burghers" were taxed with money. ...


13

As described, your tax system will be difficult to implement The problem with taxing by proportion of income is that it will be very hard to enforce without a ridiculous amount of literate manhours. Every single individual will somehow have to show how much they have earned in the previous tax period, which will be impossible unless they are able to keep ...


2

Not familiar with the mentioned book series but assuming it is related enough to our real world situation. Missed income would be an issue. Person A earns 100 gold in a month Person B earns 9000 gold in a month. this would mean that in your system Person A would pay 10 gold and person B would pay 900 gold leaving Person A with 90 and Person B with ...


1

I think that a lot depends on the state of the current members of your space-UN. If those members are post-scarcity-societies, the new planet will quickly gain access to the UN. Yet, trade will come first. As soon contact is possible it will be made. And provided that it is possible for private companies to make contact and have the physical possibilities ...


3

Assume that travel and trade is possible. Then the usual reason to trade is comparative advantage. Planet A has pretty exhausted mines for iron ore (because they've been producing steel tablespoons for a long time) and excellent factories for tablespoons (same reason). Say that it takes 10 man-days to mine the ore for a shipment of tablespoons, and 10 man-...


-3

Interstellar trade is impossible Space is big. I’m sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but interstellar trade is impossible. The travel time between even relatively close worlds is obscenely high compared to human life spans. Traveling out and back to the nearest star from Sol is 8 years if you go at lightspeed, which matter cannot do. The best theoretical ...


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