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4

No. Just that, a solid nope. Normally I'd ask for some more information, but not only you said to just assume they can fly, you said it yourself that groundbirds are only capable of flying for relatively short distances and have a lifestyle that relies very little on flight. Much like ducklings raised by chickens alongside chicks don't suddenly become afraid ...


-3

This can't be done with Bronze Age resources Bridgekeeper: What... is the air-speed velocity of an unladen swallow? King Arthur: What do you mean? An African or a European swallow? It doesn't matter how many trained birds you have. The material weight available during the bronze age combined with its low tensile strength will always prohibit flight. Even ...


0

Q: nearly every animal of any potential use (even just as a status symbol for psychics) was domesticated hundreds of millennia ago in this timeline. That's a lot of time to develop an interrelation.. suppose Animals are prepared to cooperate for you Consider the potential of using a flock of geese for your aircraft. Men and geese have always been friends.. ...


5

If we consider the extant birds known to carry large weights, it would appear that the bird species known to carry the largest weight is the bald eagle, which has been confirmed to be able to carry 15lb. It has a wingspan of up to 2.3m, and a beak to tail length of up to 1m. For purposes of this answer, let us suppose that the birds we will use can carry ...


5

The key is mind-controlling spiders. You can carry whatever you like if you distribute the weight among enough birds, and how far you can fly depends on how well you swap them out for birds who aren't tired. The limiting factor is the weight of the lines attaching birds to your glider. Once the line weighs more than the bird can carry, it's useless. So, ...


0

If it is a fantasy setting, then we can find many examples from movies and tales. Magic carpet as in Aladdin. Genie as in Thief of Baghdad. Wings of Daedalus. Some kind of power as Throne of Queen of Sheba was brought from Yemen to Jerusalem in the twinkling of an eye.


4

Rocketry. The Chinese implemented this technology centuries before the invention of engines.


7

No magic required It is entirely possible for humans to power their own flight, it'll just take some ingenuity, the right materials, and a good pair of legs, such as is the case of the Daedalus human-powered flight project, which had a flight time of basically four hours and covered seventy four miles(119.1km). You'll just have to exclude human legs from ...


5

If you don't want magic, basically strap a bicycle like implement on top of an hot air/hydrogen/helium balloon. Connect the pedals to propellers and you get a quiet aircraft. It would move slowly and winds could blow faster than you can pedal but it is still an aircraft with no engine at all. Maybe you could use imps to pedal, better power to weight ratio.


3

Pulsejet. With no fiddly pistons, crank-shafts, big ends issues, this might be a good bet: Tosaka via Wikipedia, 2022, CC BY-SA 3.0 With few (or no) moving parts, this is about the most primitive sort of propulsion you'll get, just feed it something volatile like gasoline, terpene or alcohol and it'll produce resonant pulses of propulsive force. It'll ...


5

Of course, wind magic is the answer - summon (preferrably steady) strong winds in the desired direction, to "power" your plane. Though it might be easier (if all you need is to transport one person) to use just a piece of cloth (suitably crafted, of course): But if you do not insist on heavier than air aircraft, then a (hot air, hydrogen or magic-...


3

Feathers don't need fingers. https://www.mun.ca/biology/scarr/Analogy_of_forelimbs.html The bat uses the tips of its "fingers" to anchor the far side of the flight membrane. We will call the fingers vertical and the membrane horizontal because that is how it is in this picture. For a bird, all the feathers are vertical elements. Having some ...


2

I'm not sure this is possible. Bat wings fly with a very different movement compared to bird wings. A bird's wing moves rather like a human flapping their arms up and down: there's little flexibility of movement, so stiff feathers work to maintain a reasonably consistent flight profile without gaps in the wing surface. A bat, on the other hand, should have ...


0

There are a number of adaptations that would be required to have a humanoid flying species with a human-like level of intelligence, living at high altitude: Small size. Most good fliers are lightweights, weighing less than one kilogram. The largest flying bird is around 20kg. This imposes a maximum weight for this species. Given that it appears that the ...


2

Vulture people. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Griffon_vulture Like other vultures, it is a scavenger, feeding mostly from carcasses of dead animals which it finds by soaring over open areas, often moving in flocks. It establishes nesting colonies in cliffs that are undisturbed by humans while coverage of open areas and availability of dead animals within ...


1

Domesticating the pterosaur implies domesticating the moa. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moa Before the arrival of human settlers, the moa's only predator was the massive Haast's eagle... Polynesians arrived sometime before 1300, and all moa genera were soon driven to extinction by hunting and, to a lesser extent, by habitat reduction due to forest ...


8

The dragon riders would be children Like other answerers have pointed out, a grown human is too heavy to be carried any significant distance, but a small enough child should be light enough. Children have been used for all sorts of things that adults are too large to do. Probably the most applicable example is camel jockeys. According to the Wikipedia ...


2

A big Q. northropi may have the ability fly that far if it was unencumbered and could catch some good thermals. Slapping a human on its back would likely greatly decrease its range. But, it would be a formidable way to discourage European real estate ambitions. :-) 1642: Able Tasman's expedition lost without a trace. 1769 (as reported by one of the few ...


10

The problem is mass. Large pterodactyls like Q. Northropi evolved only at the expense of having to shed every gram of unnecessary weight possible. Their bones were full of air spaces that saved weight at the expense of load bearing capability. And their muscle mass was restricted to the minimum needed to get them airborne and up to altitude. After that like ...


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