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Your travelers could use a hot air balloon -- which has nothing to do with the sea. That won't happen until later in their civilization, though- but it is the earliest example of a flying machine. That being said, the first people to reach the island may have used a scuba-type device . A Sulfur hexafluoride diver would carry what appears to others as a ...


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Problem 1: Weight The weight is the largest issue here. If you want any kind of boat to float on this while supporting humans, you will need something extremely light, and significantly large enough to carry a human. This could be anything from large drums containing air to create a raft, but a fair few of them would be needed. Or a large enough boat ...


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An ordinary bag filled with ambient air, if large enough, will float a ship's deck. If you have large fins going down below the air bag, they can act as a keel to react against sails (though if you have enough wind to sail, you're in danger of losing your "airsea"). Basically this would be a gas balloon, only the lifting gas is air -- every cubic meter of ...


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Unlikely The principle of screws as propulsion works as good as it does in water, because water is non compressable, meaning the screw can't not press the medium outwards. With air however you loose way to much energy to air that gets forced to the side. You could of cause make a screw with a very small core relative to the diameter, but then you could ...


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The "nimbleness" of the airplane depends a lot on how it is designed. The A6M Zero is about as nimble as any WWII era fighter of the era due to factors like power to weight ratio, wing loading, the strength of the materials used to build the aircraft and so on. You could probably build a replica A6M using composite materials, powered by a compact gas turbine ...


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The limitation of "nimbleness" for a piloted airplane is the pilot. A human pilot can't take prolonged G loads much over 6G, even with a G-suit and extensive training and experience. Shorter period loads can run as high as 8G without undue hazard. It's not particularly difficult to build an airframe that can withstand 12G positive and negative (usually, ...


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No All flying animals are warm blooded to some degree. Pterosaurs, birds, and bats are all warm-blooded. Insects are even warm-blooded compared to other arthropods, they are technically cold-blooded on the ground but use their massive wing muscles (which occupy most of their thorax) and to rev up their metabolism before they fly, and are temporarily warm-...


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Utility Fog The atmosphere is saturated with a thin fog of microscopic nanobots, capable of linking together to create larger machines. The card is simply a program and a transmitter that sends a signal to all nearby "foglets", calling them together to form the creature. Summoning takes time because it takes a while for the foglets to migrate to the ...


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Wormholes and entanglement Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic. - Arthur C. Clarke Eyeing that science-based tag, I'm awfully skeptical that there's a scientific way to summon an eagle. But if we assume the eagle is real, and his attacks are real, all we need to do is figure out a plausible way to get him there. First, ...


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Your creature is a hologram and the card is a projector with a self recharging battery (solar, nuclear, soul sucking, up to you). When Belram is attacked, the projector needs to simulate the damage and interaction with the Belram which consumes more power causing the hologram to fail and return to its "Card form" after receiving a few blows. This is also ...


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The problem is not really power. I have a powered "exoskeleton" - AKA Piper Cherokee - that allows me to fly perfectly well. And I could use another sort of exoskeleton - a hang glider - to fly in much the same way that large soaring birds do. No, the real problem is flapping flight, at any scale or power level. To do that reasonably well, you need a ...


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Possibly But not with current materials nor a fully humanoid shape Consider power and energy requirements for what you intend to do. Then consider the tyranny of the square cube law. To lift a human, jetpacks usually have a power output of about a thousand HP. You can buy a 1,050 HP one at Selfridges & Co if you have half a million pounds to spend (...


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Not the answer you're looking for: I believe the answer is that it's effectively impossible. For drag itself your limit is going to be drag vs grip strength. I believe your witch will be subject to their own weight at something around 140 mph, drag goes at the square of velocity. However, you're gripping the broom in a very inefficient way. Note that ...


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