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I believe the future of humanity is in the atmosphere and as this might be the case I'd argue that they would be wearing gases. particularly girls would wear pink clouds and dudes will wear blue or purple ones also with future advancements such as in the areas of nano-tech underwears could be some sorta hugging-nanites to provide a desirable body ...


1

Let's assume that your telekinetic bubble is massless, so in order to lift a human of mass $m$ you need a bubble which displaces that mass of air. At standard temperature and pressure air has a density $\rho = 1.225 \mathrm{kg/m^3}$, so we need to displace a volume of $m/\rho \approx 57 \mathrm{m^3}$. Inflating your telekinetic bubble would not be quite ...


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Physical advantage? Uncertain. Storywriting potential? Certainly. "Lifting yourself by your own bootstraps", while a typical comic trope to give hypothetically non-flying characters flying abilities, ignores momentum and the laws of motion. But more importantly, it's boring. If you can stand on an object and lift it, you might as well just wrap yourself ...


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If you can move the force field, then the energy to move oneself by standing / riding on the force field would be much less than to create a vacuum capable of lifting yourself. A benefit, assuming you don't need to be conscious to keep the shape of the force field, is you could float while asleep to travel all night.


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Something like a swim bladder would help but fill it with helium, hydrogen or another gas (you would away to expel it for landing and pull it back in). If this is fantasy you could slap magic on it, think Chinese dragon they are giant serpents but they still fly. If you don't want to use magic then here are some numbers that might help you. Birds can go up 5,...


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Using explanations like gas filled cavities and such, like Naomi Novik does, is not the best approach. Such a dragon would not look like a dragon, but a hot air balloon. If the explanation makes it even less credible, don't try to explain it at all. (Then there is Falcor from Neverending Story, who doesn't have wings at all.) One of the best ways around ...


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Let's first look at how high a bird can fly: The endangered Ruppell's griffon vulture is the highest flying bird ever recorded, and it can ascend to heights of 37,000 feet. That's the average height at which a commercial airplane travels (and a Ruppell's griffon vulture has indeed been sucked into a jet engine at 37,000 feet) Second comes the common ...


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Steam powered turboprop engines are also a possibility no one's attempted to address. Also, some ice airplanes have gearboxes instead of having prop attached directly to crankshaft. Steam powered piston engines are heavier than gas or diesel when compared by horsepower but if I'm not wrong generate more torque, allowing them to take further advantage of a ...


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I believe it would create a vortex of some sorts around your city. As the Dome spins, it will drag the air in contact with the surface with it, accelerating it close to the speed of sound. I say close because chances are you will have Air particles hitting the dome, bouncing off faster than the speed of sound, colliding with subsonic particles and creating a ...


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1) they would not break the sound barrier. A sonic boom is generated when the object moves through air and builds up a critical "bubble" of air pressure in front of it. As your spheres are rotating in place, this would not occur. 2) it depends on the mass of the object vs that of the dome (and the force propelling it to spin). As I'm envisioning city or ...


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