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Jumping out of the plane The trick is that instead of calculating a single jump through the galactic plane, and having to calculate the gravitational effect of every star along the way, the new ships do one jump out of the plane, one jump across it, and another back in. The jump out is almost instantaneous because it’s the reverse of when you previously ...


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There are possible parallels here to the shift from steam to diesel power in shipping, which began to occur around WW2 era (though most ships built for the war itself used steam plant). One notable example of a large, diesel-powered warship of that era was the Graf Spee. A diesel engine can be started and/or throttled up in a matter of a few seconds; a ...


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Computational Load is not an Effective Limitation I don't think the need to wait for a computation to finish will be believable to your readers as a reason why the old ships need 72 hours to get ready to jump to warp speed. If our world is any guide, computers are likely be be cheap and easily replaced. A ship owner who can cut three days off each trip (six ...


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It's a false flag to hide cloaking tech The military recently launched ground breaking cloaking tech. It's primary use is to gather intel. To prevent the enemy knowing that you are finding out about their buildup of an amadada before the ships have even gathered (due to you cloaked spy drones), you make it look like you are only findout out as it begins, but ...


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First you jump, after it's up to another engine These big Dreadnoughts are... big. Vast even. They could house more than one FTL engine. So it's really a simple question of economics. Small, non military ships contain only one FTL engine, with no steering capacity. You can jump, you can break, but this is all. You will need to be very careful before starting ...


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The safety record is impeccable as when the dreadnought makes a mistake and drops out of warp in the wrong place (another ship, large asteroid, small planet etc) its the other object that gets obliterated. Thanks to some new super shields and a lot of armor plating there is nothing a dreadnought can hit which isn't going to have a very bad day while the ...


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Broadly, blending inertial dampening with the way steam-catapults get carrier aircraft up to speed so much more quickly than the same planes leave the ground. Beyond that, should you not be asking he who wrote the rule-book, particularly if it says conventional warp can take upward of 72 hours to plot? How would that drive hold everything still while its ...


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Extrapolating from modern airlines: Older ships needed to run calculations to find the route that costs the least fuel to get there, because there's lots of competition and lifting fuel into the ship is expensive, so every penny saved in fuel is a huge increase in profits. Ships have historically taken longer/slower routes than needed, because the route used ...


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It doesn't actually take 72 hours (sorta) Most of the normal 72 hours isn't spent getting the ship ready for the jump, but rather getting the jump ready for the ship. This means that we can get rid of a large amount of that time if the jump is closer to being ready all the time. Most older ships would calculate hundreds of routes and then find the fastest ...


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It's MUCH more expensive, but the expense is warranted by being a warship. A new algorithm computes destinations all the time First, they have a larger auxiliary generator and a bank of computers that does nothing but syncing and plotting all the time, in case you need it. The only breakthrough is a new algorithm that uses the data they are collecting to ...


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Precalculation I'm assuming "warp" is instantaneous travel, not mere "light speed or a couple times faster". Otherwise, saving 3 days just doesn't change much on a galactic scale. If something takes 72 hours to calculate, then it really makes sense to start calculating it 72 hours in advance. But if you need to be able to warp anywhere in ...


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It's an ongoing lie. The new tech is fake. All demonstrations were scripted step-by-step. The ships absolutely knew where to go 72 hours before, that's why they could go there. Any outsider trying to buy the new ships will be refused sale or stalled for as long as possible. Possible reasons: a) It's a deterrent against an enemy who could attack anywhere. ...


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It was a lie Sure, it used to take 72 hours to sync up and get the flight data. 100 years ago. But over time improvements in ship computers, additional satellites, improvements in encoding, all of those have chipped away at the time it takes to get the data. Until as long as 20 years ago plotting FTL took less than a minute. But that didn't suit the ...


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You know, warp engines have strange effects on the fabric of space-time, and we can exploit them When the dreadnought officer presses the button, the flight control center starts all the calculations or - in case of departure from an uncolonized system - the dreadnought releases a small probe, which collects and computes all the data necessary for the jump. ...


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The upgrade uses Laplace's Demon, and a lot of memory. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laplace%27s_demon According to determinism, if someone (the demon) knows the precise location and momentum of every atom in the universe, their past and future values for any given time are entailed; they can be calculated from the laws of classical mechanics.[2] The ...


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Bureaucracy. The commercial ships have to file a flight plan, get permission from the destination, get clearance from the departing system, sign waivers in triplicate and in physical form, to alleviate the system from liability, pass all inspections and get customs clearances, pass all quarantine conditions, make sure all payments are cleared by the ...


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It still takes 72 hours, a tiny tweak in the order of events makes it seem instant. After a few decades of CEOs cutting talent from the engineering department and using the savings to pay their own bonuses, there was no chance the company could improve on their design. The ships still need 72 hours to calculate trajectories, warm up the engines, and ...


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It's all just marketing BS. What they fail to mention is that you can only jump straight to warp if your "destination" is nearby (like, a few light-minutes nearby). As you surely know, the drive safety interlocks won't let you engage the drive unless you've plotted your route completely and know you aren't going to run into anything. Well, some ...


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The older Warp drives are ballistic. Like a bullet fired from a gun. You have to set the direction and impulse at the beginning, and thus need to have your settings exactly right, or you miss your destination. The new Warp drive is dynamically steerable, like a missile. You can continually refine your orientation, so all you need to get started is the ...


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The Dreadnoughts are taking advantage of a breakthrough in FTL communication technology, and they continue to sync with the networks and plot the coordinates while already at warp. For this to work, we assume: The ship does not need the whole trajectory calculated to safely begin the jump, but does need it to safely complete the jump. Calculating the local (...


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The warp requires setting up rather precise location around the target star to match your velocity vector with the gravitational field at the destination. For this, you need extraordinary precision of your location, something like $10^{-5}$ per distance error is already too much (i.e. within an AU or so per lightyear). Now, you use GPS (Galactic positioning ...


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Possibly $\sim$50 million light-years I agree with the broader point in Ash's answer, if not the specifics. Cosmic voids are structures on the order of tens of millions to possible billions of light-years across. In general, they have low densities, roughly $\sim$10% of the mean density in the universe. That said, many voids do contain galaxies, albeit ...


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The Cosmological Horizon People, of the superstitious sort, used to think that the world was flattish and that, at the horizon, the world ended, and there was a great waterfall and if you sailed over it, you'd die. Well, eventually. For a little while, at least, you'd have a really good view of some really big oliphants before crashing into the bitter cold ...


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The supervoid sounds pretty promising There's a 1.8 billion light-year across feature called the supervoid. It's about 3 billion light-years away from Earth, and averages 5 protons per cubic meter. I have no idea what it will look like to the naked eye. If I had to guess: Probably billions of tiny fine pinpricks of light that you can only see if looking ...


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