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If you had just googled you'd have found your answer here... The frequency spectrum of Cherenkov radiation by a particle is given by the Frank–Tamm formula: $d^2E \over dxd\omega$$=$$q^2 \over 4\pi$$\mu(\omega)\omega$$(1-{c^2 \over v^2n^2(\omega)})$ The Frank–Tamm formula describes the amount of energy E emitted from Cherenkov radiation, per unit ...


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Yes! There are some physicists who have proposed exactly this: closed timelike curves (a more technical name for a specific kind of time travel that might be allowed by general relativity) create alternative universes which exist in quantum superposition. From Wikipedia: In 1991, David Deutsch came up with a proposal for the time evolution equations, ...


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Here are some common theories that allow two-way FTL that can solve your antitelephone problem. It is important to note though that nearly every field of theoretical physics has actually ruled out the possibility of time travel, and maintains that IF superluminal travel is possible, that you will not actually be able to go back in time. If you can not go ...


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I’m on a mobile device so my answer is brief here. A multiverse allows for FTL of a sort. The catch is, you (the FTL traveller) can never return to the previous universe. Nor can anyone or anything else. Not even a photon. The problem of calling it FTL is that there’s no common framework, so it’s not “Fast”, and it’s therefore not really FTL, even though ...


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First of all your issue isn't FTL travel, your issue is time travel. In theory if you can teleport from one world to another you have FTL but not time travel, you're linking them but that's ok. Whenever a paradox could arise, the universe splits into two (or maybe more) more or less internally consistent universes A good way to think of this is there'...


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My question is: Do the preceding paragraphs make sense or is there a serious flaw in my thinking? Yes. There is a flaw in your thinking. You are assuming that traveling FTL means that you are also traveling back in time. In reality, FTL is impossible. You can't travel faster than light. But if you could, given that time dilates and reaches 0 at the point of ...


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Galactus Renan here :D What would be the size of wormhole to information only? If you only wish to pass information through, then any size you do - you could point lasers at it, and the light should come out on the other side. That way you could use light pulses to communicate in binary, computer language - or quantum computer language if you can ...


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I can't answer question number 2, but I believe the answer to question 1 is pretty easy. The size of a wormhole that needs to carry information only is only a few inches or less. The fiber optic cables that carry most of the entire internet are surprisingly thin (I work at an internet company, and those things get accidentally cut by backhoes at least ...


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