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24 votes

How can kaiju exist in nature and not significantly alter civilization?

They do destroy settlements. From time to time. But then, settlements are also destroyed by barbarian invaders, famine, plague, volcano eruptions, flood, and forest fires. From time to time. The ...
o.m.'s user avatar
  • 117k
20 votes

Life on a planet with never-ending rain

What would life be like on a planet where it rains constantly, assuming conditions similar to Earth? The Netherlands and the UK manage it pretty well, they just complain a lot about the weather. ...
L.Dutch's user avatar
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17 votes

Life on a planet with never-ending rain

assuming conditions similar to Earth? I think you have to assume that it won't be globally that similar to Earth. The problem you have is that planets are big, and the climate is very variable across ...
Starfish Prime's user avatar
15 votes
Accepted

How can kaiju exist in nature and not significantly alter civilization?

Huge. Slow. Indestructible. You don't need to change the world too much, provided you don't make the Kaiju too common. Think of your titanic monsters as a different type of hurricane. They do much ...
Daron's user avatar
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11 votes
Accepted

Would the diet described below sustain a human?

You are fine there are real world cultures with a less varied diet. the native mongolians come to mind. Eating the rothe will be enough so long as they eat ALL of it, maybe some milk and cheese. The ...
John's user avatar
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9 votes

How can kaiju exist in nature and not significantly alter civilization?

People do use Kaiju parts to make things. Only, you need a dead Kaiju to properly mine it. Because Kaiju and human habitation get along like water and elemental sodium, a dead Kaiju will by necessity ...
HAEM's user avatar
  • 1,337
8 votes

How can kaiju exist in nature and not significantly alter civilization?

Homo sapiens is the only invasive species having a large body and which has a sort of compulsion to invade and destroy any environment. All other species prefer, when possible, to just get their ...
L.Dutch's user avatar
  • 291k
6 votes

How would sensible waste disposal be accomplished for terrestrial creatures in a primitive society?

This will not be a problem. We have plentiful examples of similar historical societies which dealt with accumulations of excrement by treating it as a valuable resource; since your animal societies ...
ihaveideas's user avatar
  • 5,013
6 votes

How can kaiju exist in nature and not significantly alter civilization?

You're thinking too small You are probably thinking of beasts that are just big enough to go over city walls with ease. Beasts in the size range that contains Godzilla and King Kong, for example. In ...
The Square-Cube Law's user avatar
6 votes

Feasibility of a bio-engineered, floating tree lifeform in the Venusian atmosphere?

I worry that something the size of a tree may be very fragile. If it has a tiny leak it may start to fall. How about something smaller? How about an aerial version of a volvox colony. This would be a ...
Richard Kirk's user avatar
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5 votes

How can kaiju exist in nature and not significantly alter civilization?

The super-exotic materials is simple: they involve danger to humans. Ironically enough, it doesn't even have to be real. If people used the bodies and got hit by a coincidental plague, or even ...
Mary's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

The miraculous substance of carrangan: can it exist, and what does it change about its planet of origin?

Quoting from a comment above: "The substance is viewed as “miraculous” by offworlders for its abundance and usefulness as food and adhesive..." You asked how this would affect the ecosystem. ...
Jani Miettinen's user avatar
5 votes

Life on a planet with never-ending rain

It washes out the ground over time, similar to australia which is so old it has seen alot of rain. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_Plate So very little nutrients and those usually captured in ...
Pica's user avatar
  • 4,696
5 votes

Feasibility of a bio-engineered, floating tree lifeform in the Venusian atmosphere?

Extracting water from the ambient sulfuric acid would be an incredible feat. Concentrated sulfuric acid will rip the water right out of carbohydrates, leaving a pile of carbon soaked with somewhat ...
Christopher James Huff's user avatar
4 votes
Accepted

Which natural process could make the surface of a planet temporarily uninhabitable for some, but habitable for other species?

The simplest thing would be radical temperature changes. During the day temperatures get very high, at night they plummet very low. One species thrives in the hot temperatures but can't survive the ...
Jay's user avatar
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4 votes

How can kaiju exist in nature and not significantly alter civilization?

The Kaiju are ancient creations of a lost civilization of high magic and follow predictable rules. An ancient civilization which had more access to advanced magic created them, and set them loose to ...
Nepene Nep's user avatar
  • 40.1k
3 votes

How can kaiju exist in nature and not significantly alter civilization?

Because the kaiju are sea monsters rather than dinosaurs. How are they not destroying settlements all the time? Settlements are on land, and the kaiju can't get close enough to land to do much. Sure,...
Telastyn's user avatar
  • 5,659
3 votes

What would our world look like if it only got 160 days of sun in a year?

To have constant rain the Earth would not be able to sustain any life at all on land. It would require temperature high enough to evaporate the rain almost as fast as it falls to keep the water ...
Kilisi's user avatar
  • 26.6k
3 votes

How can kaiju exist in nature and not significantly alter civilization?

Kaiju are easily repelled. We tend to think of kaiju as big dangerous monsters with a disregard for (or animosity towards) humanity, but there's no reason the opposite can't be true: kaiju are ...
JamieB's user avatar
  • 7,642
3 votes

What life would thrive on land which is frequently -- but not always -- doused with seawater?

The Bay of Fundy has tides of up to 16 meters. The Severn estuary in the UK has tides over 12 meters. The tidal region in both cases looks fairly barren. I would imagine if nothing lived there at all, ...
Richard Kirk's user avatar
  • 10.2k
3 votes

How can kaiju exist in nature and not significantly alter civilization?

It might be best to consider what kaiju can't do in your world. This would limit them (and limit your options), but it would make for a more "realistic" feel as omnipotent creatures are a ...
Slarty's user avatar
  • 37.7k
3 votes
Accepted

What type of climate or geography would allow for a large mountain (10000m+) that glows when the sunlight hits the rockface?

On an Earthlike world, you'll have a job getting a mountain that reaches up much higher than Everest does, because you run into problems like stuff sinking into the mantle underneath, and rock ...
Starfish Prime's user avatar
3 votes

What type of climate or geography would allow for a large mountain (10000m+) that glows when the sunlight hits the rockface?

Active Volcano You can have the mountain literally glow by giving it a caldera full of magma. If the lake of liquid rock has enough convection to keep cycling the surface layer without cooling, it’ll ...
SRM's user avatar
  • 25.6k
2 votes

Fluvial systems: Are they necessary for human survival in domed cities on waterless planets

Is a fluvial system necessary: no. Where fluvial system is an open water system ie streams. Based upon space station, antarctic stations. Various incidences of people living many months in enclosed/...
Gault Drakkor's user avatar
2 votes

Which natural process could make the surface of a planet temporarily uninhabitable for some, but habitable for other species?

Here's my answer: Think of the relationship between Trees and Animals - Trees need CO2 to grow and produce Oxygen, Animals needs Oxygen and produce CO2. Lets take that idea to an extreme. Species A as ...
TheDemonLord's user avatar
  • 29.1k
2 votes

Which natural process could make the surface of a planet temporarily uninhabitable for some, but habitable for other species?

Take a large and hot star, with the liquid-surface-water zone (Goldilocks zone) relatively far out. The orbit of the planet is somewhat elliptical, ranging from the inner limit to the outer limit over ...
o.m.'s user avatar
  • 117k
2 votes

Would the diet described below sustain a human?

Most likely, you could not 'avoid common food deficiencies in humans' with a diet of meat, fish, amd fungus. Unless the fungus contains vitamin C, you would probably suffer from scurvy. The brown ...
Penguino's user avatar
  • 7,463
2 votes

Growth rate of super moss

Hyper-active plants usually have one thing in common- they have adapted to very constrained environments. From there it spreads- at an alarming rate when taking to the lush lowlands. Example: https://...
Pica's user avatar
  • 4,696
1 vote

Using real examples, how long might it take for the species in a forest/jungle to respond to sudden climate change?

Im gonna assume that climate change is about the temperatures becoming hotter. Cause colder- we had that, we know how it went and it was not wetter, it was drier, cool and glaciers encroaching. So ...
Pica's user avatar
  • 4,696
1 vote

Growth rate of super moss

Important Note: Please keep in mind that i am no biologist. So my ideas should be taken with a grain of salt. They were forced to adapt to survive Your world as its completely covered in moss and ...
Fallenspacerock's user avatar

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