Hot answers tagged

226

They weather. https://www.livescience.com/18343-seal-mummies-antarctic-microbes.html Antarctica has dry valleys where, for some reasons, seals sometimes went. It is a bad place for seals, and they died. It is a bad place for microbes and everything else too, so the dead seals did not decompose. These mummies are hundreds of years old. The mummies ...


202

Assuming that it's purely random, let's consider where these people would probably be. Taking the percentage of the population each country represents, we get: China: 18.2% = 6.37 people India: 17.5% = 6.125 people America: 4.29% = 1.5 people Indonesia: 3.43% = 1.2 people Pakistan: 2.78% = 0.93 people ...etc. The percentage keeps going down. This means ...


186

It's HF radio, or nothing The odds of anyone meeting again are almost exactly equal to the odds of at least two being either radio hams, or able to learn the skills from books. The population density of 35 people worldwide is so extremely low that the odds of finding someone without the benefit of global communications is practically zero. Strategies like ...


142

The ocean is a dynamic and very large place, so it's unlikely to have many large-scale effects unless humans overreact. I'll focus on the local, immediate effects of this saucer from a physical, biological, and chemical perspective. Some things to consider about the location of the saucer- it's suspended in the middle of the Atlantic Ocean, almost directly ...


123

The remains would mummify, petrify, erode, and eventually become just another mineral layer. Where water is available the organic remains will dissolve and be replaced with inorganic minerals to form fossils, and if no water is available the remains will desiccate and be preserved as mummies. There wasn't much specification regarding the timeline or ...


110

The maximum height a mountain can have on Earth is a tad more than what Mount Everest is high. This is due to the fact that when you increase the height of the structure, you are also increasing the load. After a certain point you will be adding too much weight for what the material can sustain, and the entire structure will crumble on itself. The potential ...


109

Natural Vaccination. Read about how Cowpox was used to vaccinate against Smallpox, this is our IRL first instance of vaccination against a disease. The word “vaccination,” coined by Jenner in 1796, is derived from the Latin root vaccinus, meaning of or from the cow. Once vaccinated, a patient develops antibodies that make them immune to cowpox, but they ...


107

Not with the time constraint given. Let's start with the most destructive thing we've got: nukes. There are about 15,000 nukes worldwide, of varying yields. Sources: World Nuclear Weapon Stockpile, Plougshares Fund, 2018 Federation of American Scientists, 2018 Assuming an average yield of 200 kilotons, which is what most US nukes have, we could assemble ...


92

I can imagine battlefield logistics would be much easier. One of the most dangerous and common tasks for infantry is shuttling supplies back and forth between the front lines and the forward camp. If you could load up a huge pack with crates of ammunition or even vehicles, the "runner" could transform into a T-Rex, run the munitions up to the front, and ...


90

One day. Few at most. In most modern countries death reports are passed to government agency on daily basis. Clerk responsible for them would be surprised that there are none in his area. He will notice sudden drop, and 0 in one category. At least some clerks would call their counterparts in adjacent areas to chit-chat about this impossible coincidence, and,...


83

As @Thucydides mentioned, researchers posited a similar magnitude of impact and thought they had found evidence for it, though they later retracted their findings they did calculate the potential effects. The team, from the Southern Methodist University in Texas, analysed more than a million earthquake reports, looking for the tell-tale signal of ...


79

All the people who said "We all die!" are correct with good answers, but for most people it won't be the earthquakes that kill them -- they'll already be dead. The leakage from the radiation beam will be large enough to fry pretty much everything. As it cuts through the atmosphere -- even before it hits the ground -- it will scatter a huge amount of energy, ...


79

You've already accepted an answer, but aside from the structural issues (and the sheer mindboggling amount of energy it would take to pump all that water up that high), there's another misunderstanding: allow a train running on a train track going up the cone to escape earth's orbit? Getting into orbit isn't simply a matter of getting up really high. ...


78

Because some self-proclaimed health guru claims that it's good for you to have that disease. The miracle-virus causes your body to absorb free cosmic energies. Your constantly raising body temperature is proof that it works. The headache you feel is because your brain is reconfiguring itself to become more effective. When the process is over, you ...


77

310 Km/h is 86 m/s. This means that on your 250 meters track (for acceleration), you'll have a mean speed of 43 m/s, meaning that you'll reach your 250m in 5.81 seconds. Now, 86 m/s reached in 5.81 s is 14.8 m/s², or about 1.5 g (same for deceleration). Maybe not really comfortable, especially for "regular" people not used to this kind of acceleration during ...


75

First of all they should only teleport things, not people. People talk. Otherwise, they're in the shipping business. They should use their teleportation ability to mimic real world transportation so as to avoid any suspicion. For example If they are supposed to teleport something from A to B that it would take a month to get to B then they should still make ...


71

Think Small Instead of moving items very large distances; why not move them small distances; it's not like you get paid per mile. You could almost entirely remove the equipment cost and drastically increase the speed of repairs for things like large trucks, ships, and even in-place mechanical repairs on large machinery systems. Instead of needing an ...


67

The first thing that it's important to understand is that evolution is a by-product of natural selection, not the driver of it. That is to say, every change introduced by DNA combinations and mutations over time is (more or less) random, although the selection of which will become more common over time is not. Ultimately, the most important factor in the ...


65

No. On this scale, the Earth is not solid and rigid. It's more like extremely hot jello, with a thin and weak crust, a layer of hot floppy jello, the "mantle", a liquid outer core (actually molten iron) that's about 1,400 miles thick, and an inner core of iron about 750 miles in radius. Films and TV programmes that show journeys to the centre of the ...


64

It depends on how far from the current production possibilities frontier this technology is. There are several possibilities, depending on the technology gap: It is like the Apollo Moon mission to Stone Age hunter-gatherers. We (the hunter gatherers) can probably recover some debris, use it to bash stones or store berries, but we have neither the industrial ...


62

No. Most of the preceding responses have overlooked one relatively-recently identified home for life on the planet; within the crust itself. Researchers have found bacteria up to 4 kilometers down in continental crust and 2 km beneath oceanic crust. Recent estimates are that up to 70% of the microbial life on the planet is, in fact, in the deep biosphere. ...


61

No, but... If you restart evolution, you would end up with new species. But some of their features may be very similar to what we know in our world. The Nobel Prize winner Jacques Monod said that evolution is based on chance and necessity. According to him, there is no final causality that would lead evolution towards a specific goal (like creating Humans ...


59

The CDC estimates 187,000 people in the USA die from "injury" every year -- basically that includes homicide, suicide, vehicle accidents, and other forms of accidental death. This works out to a chance of about 1/1600 of an individual dying from injury in any given year. So the chance of survival is 0.999375. After 300 years, your chance of remaining alive ...


58

A millennium is a blink of an eye on a geological scale. But interesting things can happen in a blink of an eye. Even disegarding the changes which may happen as a result of the present climatological instability, small but important modification can occur here and there. I have no idea of the geographical changes between today and 3000 CE; but I do know of ...


58

Most disease suffered by humanity does not affect any other creature And the really cool thing about a plague that threatens to kill everybody if we don't get somebody off the planet (if the words "cool" and "plague" can be used in the same sentence without getting myself labeled a psychopath), is that you have to leave people behind. This gives you a ...


56

Given your obvious technical advantage, I would recommend under the ocean. This has several benefits: Immune to satellite imagery. As long as you get down successfully, you're pretty much set on the undetected front. Due to human biological limitations, the ocean is largely unexplored. We have imaged most of it, but not necessarily with great detail or ...


55

Something like this has actually happened once already 100 years wouldn't be enough to turn the Sahara into a savanah, but it would be a good start. From this source we read the following (emphasis mine): But around 10,500 years ago, a sudden burst of monsoon rains over the vast [Sahara] desert transformed the region into habitable land. This ...


54

This is an interesting question. Obviously, just walking about and hoping to meet someone is fruitless, the chances are just ridiculous. What you would want to do is communicate. Now we know how many people survived and what the likely distribution is, but they do not. From the perspective of a survivor, everyone around is suddenly dead or disappeared. ...


53

Stop thinking shock troops. Think strategic asset and later assassination. To start with, while your were-Rex's are still a military secret, hand them over to your espionage department and get the trained in the languages and behavior traits of your target enemy nation. Then get them behind enemy lines and integrated into your enemy's civilian populace. ...


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