72

Size by mass is not the same as size by 2d footprint There is a cat here. She weighs about 5 lbs. I weigh 200 lbs, rounding to nearest 100. Cat is 1/40th my size. A sack the size of me could hold 40 cats, tightly packed by someone besides me. England is 50,000 square miles. Divided by 40 is 1250 square miles. Long Island in the US is 1401 square ...


53

People are already cat sized. There are machines that People have bred to provide food for People... those machines are called “humans” (in the machines’ own tongue). The scale of England need not change because the People are already its rulers.


43

Word of mouth says: "An act of God" People living in France wouldn't see direct evidence of Asia disappearing - but they would hear about it soon enough! Eastern Europeans would see direct evidence of the land next to their houses disappearing. Such a catastrophe would immediately spread across the continent through word of mouth because of its religious ...


17

Common folk in 15th century Europe surely would notice if Asia vanished, though it might take a while. How? They'd notice that their "betters", the wealthy and the nobility, quit having new silk garments made (because there was no new silk to make them from). Servants in the mansions and palaces would notice first, then the word would pass from them to ...


16

Roughly 50,000 square miles. Did you know that the length of a 'foot' differed quite a bit - ranging everywhere between 9 and 16 inches. But ultimately, it was a measurement that was designed based off a person's size-of-foot. Did you know that the mile has been defined both by "number of paces" and "number of feet"? It gets its name from the Roman '...


13

People would notice it, but they wouldn't necessarily know what happened I'm going to assume you meant that all of the land that makes up Asia just disappeared one day. To answer your question directly at first: Europe is connected to Asia: so people at the arbitrary edge at which point Europe turns into Asia would disappear. Traders would know - and ...


10

Yes The 15th century Europeans had two qualities which would ensure that everyone knew about this. The first is that they knew that Asia existed, and regularly traded with it. The second quality is that they had quite a powerful religious organization in the Church. This is how I see the timeline: Asia disappears. A few weeks or months pass, and a ...


9

This is kind of a mixed ball of stuff here. As for the hypothetical village, peoples in villages didn't get around much. It's sort of accepted that the bulk of the population in a village was pretty stationary, with folks living their entire lives never travelling much more than 30 km from where they were born. Yes, there are traders, nomadic people ...


9

This is an excellent and sophisticated question. There would be many, many ways to think about this, such as conservation of energy, material science (you can not just slim down materials abstractly, issues of tensile strength, laminar flow etc, become critical), farming and food production, and so on. Just one interesting issue which would need to be ...


7

Amount of water on Earth is estimated at 1.386 billion km³ - let's get rid of the decimals and take it at 1 billion km³. Means 109+9=18kg of water. Let's take the average initial temperature at -200C, to account for some heating done by the planet's core and energy gained by various tidal sloshing happening during planet's braking and getting into the ...


6

Assuming an Earthlike planet orbiting a halo star and passing through the galactic disk, let's look at the case for geological evidence of supernovae. Because the planet is Earthlike we can assume the geological evidence will be effectively the same for the Earth. If its passage through the galactic disk takes it close to more supernovae than the Earth has ...


6

Yes, they would notice They would notice within a couple months at least, a few decades at most, depending on the exact part of the century. The 15th century was when the printing press was invented, and it spread fast. Also in the 15th century the Portuguese developed caravels and one dude called Vasco da Gama made an amazing discovery: they could sail ...


6

Bringing the Pacific Ocean all the way to the Urals would have a profound impact on travel and geopolitics even if there were no associated weather changes. The central European powers might consider the states of India, Bactria, Central Asia, and the far East irrelevant, but the powers immediately bordering central Europe would not. Poland-Lithuania and ...


4

Most common people in central Europe in the 15th century wouldn't be likely to notice for quite a while if EVERYTHING more than a hundred miles from where they were born vanished. The only people who would be likely to notice your proposed scenario would be people directly involved in the Silk Road trade, and even they wouldn't be able to easily tell the ...


4

Actually... If people were cats, then people would want a BIGGER Britain. A typical cat - Felis silvestris cattus (Fsc) - is often compared but not necessacily a derivate of felis silvestris (Fs) - the european wild cat. Both demand territories. Territories for domestic Fsc range from 0.07 to 0.28 km², those for Fs range from 1 to 8.7 km². Let's take the ...


4

Space dust deposition might be different in the disk. Cosmic dust of extraterrestrial origin rains down on the earth all of the time - thousands of tons of it. In your scenario, as the planet passed through the disk, one would expect a change in the quantity and composition of dust accumulating. The dust might be comprised in part of dense elements unusual ...


4

Your world should be tidally locked. An Earth-sized world close enough to a dim star can exist within the habitable zone while maintaining equal periods of revolution and rotation. This means one side will always face the star, and the other never will. Much of the planet would not be habitable. The far-side would be freezing, and the near-side would be ...


4

It may be a while before the planet becomes habitable Snowball Earth hypothesis posits that in the past there were periods when Earth was frozen all over. This is scientifically plausible. However, it is not clear how the Earth can recover from such overwhelming ice age. Even if it is staying in a comfortable orbit and receiving plenty of sunshine, ice and ...


3

if the earth itself turned into a dead immortal human We are talking of an earthquake of magnitude screw you in the Richter scale. I don’t think human survive. The end. OK, humans are saved by magic. There is a planetary size undead human. So yay! What happened to all the plants? Without any ground to take nutrients from… if they are any around, they are ...


3

Yes, everyone on earth would notice it If the whole land mass of Asia suddenly disappeared then this would soon be very noticeable because of the extreme wind speeds as air and water from the rest of the planet fills up the void. Cities within a hundred kilometers from the Asian border would be blown away, a large part of the world population would be ...


3

Superrotation You atmosphere would superrorate - a (known) way to achieve this is to have slow rotation of the planet. Tidally locking (as per Zxyrra's answer) your world is almost a necessary condition if you are around a red dwarf, but that is not quite an Earth-like condition. The most Earth-like and plausible way is to have a habitable Venus (likely ...


2

They would know something was wrong, but not what it was for a little while Climactic Effects: Asia is the largest landmass on earth, and thus it’s massive size has a considerable effect on the climate due to how much heat is reflected by land compared to water. Magically removing Asia would mean that the waters of the Pacific and Indian Oceans would ...


2

Don't forget the Ottoman Empire Most answers focus on the Far East. However, the Ottoman Empire was a big player in European politics, having conquered vast territories in the South-East of Europe and was in the process of pushing onward. The question is based on late medieval Bohemia. Which was directly bordering Hungary. Which in turn was directly ...


2

Sure, if backed up by an entire ecosystem. You'll need rain, or at least rivers or aquifers for water (blood aquifers probably won't work, too salty). So is the body surrounded by water somewhere that can evaporate and fall? You'll need plants. Human's can't go pure carnivore, you'll get scurvy and other nutritional deficiencies (if they could dig to ...


2

There are a lot of answers that describe size if humans were cats, but from what I can tell, you want humans to be the same size as cats. If we assume the average human is 6 feet tall, and the average cat is about 18 inches, that means a cat is about a quarter the size of a human, at the longest length, not counting the cats' tail. England (or rather, the ...


2

Yes. Even if the earth sized human was dead it would take an extremely long time for the rest of its gargantuan body to realize that. Basically as long as you had an atmosphere,a source of oxygen (algae mats in water and trees adapted to draw on the blood of the gigantic humanoid) and food;of which there is plenty assuming means of harvesting it. Then yeah,...


2

The current world population went, in the blink of an eye from 7 billion to 3.5 billion. This would be the largest decimation of human population in history and would immedietly make the species endangerd by technical rules. The world population hasn't been this low for a long time. In fact, you'd have to go all the way back to that amazing far flung ...


2

Explorers equipped to travel between stars ought to have no problem landing safely on a surface at just a few Kelvins -- the hazards will be the same as they'd been landing on Kuiper belt type ice-ball objects that have never been warm. Internal heat from the planet's core means that as long as it hasn't been wandering for hundreds of millions of years, the ...


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