7

This is a major undertaking. You will need a civilization somewhere between 1 and 2 on the Kardeshev Scale, and you will need to do it manually. If you have a Dyson sphere you should be able to muster up enough energy to pull it off. Start by boiling the oceans. Raising the global temperature to over 100C should do the trick. Alternatively, microwaving ...


7

Formation of super continents and their subsequent breakup is cyclical in nature. Supercontinent Cycle On geological time scales it would be reasonable to assume that there was a period in which there were only 2 major landmasses present on the planet. Your timescale of 3-4 billion years is off by an order of magnitude of the Earth's, but it would be ...


6

Welcome to the stack! Great question! The core of the planet would still be quite hot, meaning that volcanoes and underwater vents could occasionally release hot (and therefore high-energy) bursts of liquid/gas into the environment. Perhaps this could be harnessed, somehow...? This is the most likely answer, and it's occurring right here on Earth as we ...


5

We're pretty sure it's happened right here on a earth, a few times. Pangea didn't break up straight into seven continents, it was two big bits for a while both before it formed and after it broke up, and Pangea wasn't the first time all the continents had joined together either. So, not only is there no process that prevents it from happening, it's pretty ...


4

The easiest way to achieve this is through Axial Tilt and be closer to the poles. In point of fact, we already have this on Earth due to our own axial tilt. This is the same attribute that causes the seasons on Earth. Looking at this picture from the second link above you can see that at certain times of the year, the closer to the poles you are the longer ...


4

By not being dependent on wind Since you don't specify, let's put some numbers to your question. The slowest container ships today travel at around 12 knots (though they can go faster, they don't due to fuel economy). Let's say that your ship can go at least that fast. The top speed of a fast moving passenger sailing ship is around 22 knots. However, this ...


3

Let's clear up a common misconception before we get into the meat of the answer; the colour of a star is more to do with its energy output, although it can be affected by the Doppler Effect as well (stars moving away from us will appear redder, stars coming closer will appear bluer) if the relative velocities are high enough. So, no; it's not as simple as ...


2

To make a planet sized organism generate a continuous magnetic current strong enough to repel the solar wind, embedded permanent magnets would be entirely unsuitable - It would take a large planetoid's worth of magnesium or neodymium to generate a field strong enough, and be difficult to alter that field in response to stimuli or threat. In addition, that ...


2

On Earth, continental drift is caused by volcanic activity; so, are oceans. So without a lot more knowledge of what other worlds are actually like to maybe contridict that, a little bit of simple reasoning tells us that a planet with oceans should have significant continental drift over that time scale which makes 3-4 billion years of continental separation ...


2

First thing first, Pangea means "all the earth", because it encompassed the whole of the emerged land back in those times. So, from a logic point of view there can be no two Pangea. From a geological point of view, if you look at the appearance of the present emerged lands, you might argue that we have less than 5 continents: Asia, Europe and Africa are a ...


2

Magnetic Fields Water is diamagnetic, meaning that its magnetic polarisation aligns itself opposite to an applied magnetic field (thus, water is repelled by magnetic fields). This has been demonstrated in "levitating frog" experiments. If you were able to somehow get a (monodirectional) magnetic field to protrude out of the ocean, you could hypothetically ...


2

Well, if what you want is two Earth-like planets extremely close together, the best solution would be to just have them both orbit one parent star in orbits at different distances. If you look at this chart, Earth is actually on the near end of our sun's habitable zone (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circumstellar_habitable_zone#/media/File:...


2

I don't think tidal forces would be much of a problem. Our sun is responsible for roughly a third of the tidal forces felt on Earth, and if the other star is 25 AU away, the nearer planet would receive 1/625 the tidal forces from that. It will also receive 1/625 the heat and light from the farther sun than from the nearer; not enough to significantly change ...


1

I don't know why Fabius Maximus thinks that tidal forces would be too strong in a double planet or a a habitable moon of a gas giant planet. Part One of two: Two habitable planets orbiting the same star. But If Fabius Maximus thinks that is the case, the next logical step would be to have two habitable planets orbiting the same star in different orbits, ...


1

I'm going to be honest, I think this sounds a little too far outside of science for this to work. Base requirement is that the Earth and moon would have to be completely different because they would need to be closer and tidally locked so that the moon doesn't immediately rip the beanstock out of the ground. Pluto and Charon are a great candidate for that, ...


1

Because "living beings, that are older than any other being on earth" is pretty long, I will just call them "elders". Do you have an idea, what the elders actually are? Are they physical or are they some kind of spirit? Where do they live (in the oceans, on land, on mountains, inside the earth etc.)? Do they have any restrictions, for example they die in ...


1

"It depends", as always. In most plausible situations, you'll find that any moon of a gas giant will be tidally locked to its parent, eg. on a bit of the moon facing the planet, the planet will be in pretty much the same location in the sky at all times. I say "pretty much" because there are effects like libration which I can't fully quantify, but for all ...


1

Unfortunately I do not think there is any way to achieve what you require. Imparting sufficient energy to Earth’s oceans by heating or rapid motion would destroy the entire surface of the planet and drag friction with the surface would force the water to eventually fall / condense back to the surface again. Giving the water sufficient energy to reach ...


1

the names of plants and animals surely wouldn't be the same as we have Required reading: https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/TranslationConvention Should a salmon-like fish simply be called a salmon, or should I come up with a new word for it? Required reading: http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/CallARabbitASmeerp Beyond that, I don't ...


1

Electromagnets operate simply by running a current through a coil. Nerves create, albeit very small, current by transferring ions across synapses. The ionic charge of one cell, thus gets transferred to other cells via ion transfer across the gaps between receptors on either side of synapses. So it's not exactly a continuous current, but it's also not ...


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