17

What seed-dispersal method would such a plant be likely to use? For the sheep-fruit? none. The umbilical will simply snap & the 'sheep' drop off the plant right there & walk away. For it's seeds to propagate itself? the sheep-fruits' legs, they 'are' the dispersal method. The sheep-fruit would just wander off grazing as sheep are wont to do. Seeds of ...


16

They don't cook their food. Even the most elementary recipe is an inventive act, because it requires the capability of abstracting the consequence of different steps on the final result, as well as learning from experimental results. E.g. "a raw potato placed into a fire for some time becomes sweeter". Since you state They have no language or ...


11

Within your bloodstream flow several thousand dormant pluripotent pseudo-morulas. They can't stay dormant forever, of course, but the original produces more periodically as the older ones perish. Low-doses of some suppressant hormone keeps them in check. However, when eaten by some wild animal, your flesh is present within their mouths, where any number of ...


11

Something more specific than L.Dutch's application of the square-cube law is the new BMI formula: ([HEIGHT METERS] ^ 2.5) * [BMI] / 1.3 = [WEIGHT KG] For instance, let's say they have a BMI of 23 and a height of 9 feet: 30.48 centimeters to a foot 30.48 * 9 = 274.32 centimeters tall 274.32 / 100 = 2.7432 meters tall 2.7432 ^ 2.5 = 12.4636051005 12....


11

ROBERT WADLOW, 8 ft 11.1 in You can easily use a real-life example as a reference point, ROBERT WADLOW, is 8 ft 11.1 in, almost equal to what you want and Robert's greatest recorded weight was 222.71 kg (35 st 1l b) on his 21st birthday and he weighed 199 kg (31 st 5 lb) at the time of his death. You can put up an approx estimate of around 230 - 250 KGs, for ...


11

Dandelion or thistle style aerial dispersion with wool as the sail. Seeds will grow on the skin of the sheep fruit like they do on a strawberry with some of the wool of the sheep growing out of the seeds. When the seeds mature the connective tissue between the seed and the skin weakens and the seeds are pulled off into the wind and go wherever it takes them. ...


10

Suppose, earlier in their evolutionary history, dragons were smaller. As they evolved to grow larger, their surface-area-to-volume ratio began to make thermo-regulation a problem. They might develop short vertical pairs of fins (possibly made from modified scales) to improve cooling. As they continued to grow larger, however, these fins might prove to be ...


10

Yes absolutely. Bear with me, this'll take some explanation. Biochemist Michael Behe has made a splendid video showing some of the amazing things bacteria can do with nano-motors. Discovery channel, Michael Behe 2021 fair usage Amazing facts: They sit in the cell wall, with the tail in the surrounding medium. These motors can rotate at speeds of up to 100,...


9

Unless it’s already programmed in the creatures DNA it won’t spontaneously “evolve”. There’s a fine line between adaptation and evolution, the latter mostly applies to the immune system. Everything about a living thing is preprogrammed in DNA with different responses to different stimuli; if A this response and if B other response. A creatures form doesn’t ...


9

Not In Any Realistic Fashion Or rather, you could conceivably have a magic skin that is impervious to all harm, but it wouldn't protect the creature - unless you treat it like the fictional metal vibranium from the Marvel universe. The key problem here is momentum. If the animal falls from the sixth floor of the building, its shell/skin/whatever could be ...


8

The transverse processes of the vertebra. Here is Dimetrodon with its excellent sail. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dimetrodon A closeup of the vertebral body with spine. source Dimetrodon here made its sail out of the spinous process on the vertebra. But also available are the pair of transverse processes. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vertebra Your ...


8

They would cook their food using the exact same methods, tools and motivation as normal wolves. I.E. Not at all, using just their teeth, and why on earth would they cook their food? Until you allow them better cognitive abilities, they will not use fire at all.


7

Taller and more muscular! Instead of these mathematic ideals and abstractions, let us consider a real life sometime-biped much like myself - robustly built. https://unofficialnetworks.com/2021/08/19/fat-bear-brooks-falls/ This muscular grizzly bear is probably a little over 8 feet and was estimated to weigh 1400 pounds which is a nice 100 stone. That is 2....


6

Tesla Flytrap: Your trees use leaf or trunk rocking in the wind to generate electricity through a piezoelectric effect in a windy, nutrient-poor environment. The biochemistry of piezoelectric plants doesn't currently exist, but isn't that implausible. Layers of conductive (metallic or saline)material alternated with non-conductive oily material would allow a ...


6

Start with a pteranodon Now mutate the three not crazily elongated fingers to be similar to the one crazily elongated finger, acting as refined actuators for wing shape (to allow, honestly, all kinds of wacky maneuvering options). If the membrane attachment migrates up the legs, along the ribcage and just to the end of the shoulder, you'll also get the &...


6

As the L.Dutch's answer says, the cognitive ability to connect "I do this" with "I get nicer food" is what I would say is inventive. However, as you ask the question I assume you are allowing them sufficient cognition to light a fire to use for cooking which requires similar mental abilities. I will assume you mean they cannot invent a ...


6

Simple answer: no. When a car or person is speeding up, their speed eventually stops increasing. This is why cars for example have a maximum speed even at maximum throttle: the combination of inefficiencies of the engine and air drag will increase the faster you go. Lets assume that you have a perfect engine with unlimited horsepower and only air-drag being ...


5

Knockback and armor Prey is usually non cooperative with predators that want to eat them. Capturing them goes a long way into getting them in your stomach. To that end, predators usually have sharp parts such as talons, fangs or claws that help securing food. Blunt attacks, on the other hand, may have a knockback effect that sends your prey away from you. It ...


5

There aren’t because it burdens the joints. Legs on the back can work for tiny creatures but as they get larger the strain on their back leg joints, the equivalent of their hips, would get more and more unbearable. This is why large things have legs underneath. Reptiles having legs on the side also works but giant sauropods still have legs underneath to ...


5

Use the good old square cube law. Weight is proportional to the volume of a body, thus the cube of the length. If your creatures are X times the length of your reference sample, a good first approximation of their weight, all the rest being the same, is $X^3$. To give you a numerical example, if they were 2 times as tall as a human, they would weigh $2^3=8$ ...


5

@Pelinore suggests all sheep-fruits are ewes, but there's another answer: All the sheep-fruits are rams. Strong, good looking rams. Once mature, they wander off into the world in search for willing ewes. (Coincidentally, the reproductive cycle of the sheep plant is synch with that of the sheep.) If an ewe is charmed and mates with a sheep-fruit, the "...


5

Iron fusion. Fusing light atoms is exothermic. Fusing iron and heavier atoms is endothermic. https://www.as.utexas.edu/~chris/stardatearticle.pdf The fusion reactions that make elements heavier than iron are endothermic — that is, they use up more energy than the reaction gives off. So “when you get an iron core,” Sneden says, “it sucks energy in and ...


5

It better be good Blood vessels do not only transport things. They contain all kinds of agents, consuming the nutrients, or breaking down certain agents, like the immune system does. Plasma is 90 percent water already and makes up more than half of total blood volume. Other 10 percent is protein molecules, including enzymes, clotting agents, immune system ...


5

I foresee two main problems: breathing: supersonic and subsonic flows in a tube behave in different ways, the creature's airways would need to be able to support both regimes and the shockwaves produced by supersonic flow. Kind of tricky, if you want to allow both resistance to shockwaves and gas exchanges. propulsion: if the creature uses legs or something ...


4

They bury their food an inch below the surface, then start a fire on it. Once their instincts tell them the food is ready, they throw dirt over the fire with their back paws and dig up the cooked meal.


4

The colors of animals usually have less to do with sunlight, as they do not photosynthesize (unless you want them to). Human skin tone is affected by exposure to sunlight (tanning), so if the sun in your world is hotter or more intense than on Earth, humans would be darker on average than they are here. Feathers are colored to make species recognizable to ...


4

Sunlight adaptation Humans, like most animals used to be able to produce vitamin C, the animals who do are able to produce what we would consider incredible megadoses of this vitamin. Humans and most mammals lost this ability and instead developed a starving gene that allows us to survive with the lowest ammount of vitamin C possible, it makes us more ...


4

Spitting cobras can shoot liquid neurotoxins. https://theconversation.com/spitting-cobras-may-have-evolved-unique-venom-to-defend-from-ancient-humans-153570 Cobra venom contains neurotoxins as well as other toxins. It is a defensive mechanism, evolved to hurt the things it hits. Neurotoxic snake venoms hit many of the same targets as nerve gases. Sarin ...


3

I broadly agree with The Square-Cube Law but I have an example that's different enough I think it warrants it's own answer, since it's kind of the opposite: the peregrine falcon the peregrine falcon strikes its prey with a clenched foot, stunning or killing it with the impact, then turns to catch it in mid-air.[70] If its prey is too heavy to carry, a ...


3

Seeing how the dragon has its four limbs intact, it looks much more like a Chlamydosaurus (frill-necked lizard, frilled dragon) where the "frill" split in two and moved a little bit further down: I can see how this could turn into wings if it initially got some lift when jumping, and the more split they were, the more control it had. Eventually ...


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