Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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Bundt cake pen. Frisky slimes gotta move! If it hits a dead end it will start looking for cracks or go up the wall. But if there is a path of least resistance the slime will take it. It will head off down the pan. Yes, it will circle around, but these are slimes. It will not know it has circled around. It will keep going, moving fast, feeling good, ...


54

Glass jugs Make them big enough to accommodate your slimes; the slime should fill the bottom few inches and most of the jug should be empty space to prevent escapes. A slime that climbs up the wall can't pass the "upside-down" section to get to the entrance. Since it has no bones or structure, it won't be able to hold itself up the wall; so it will just ...


41

Water is 1000x denser than air, and much more viscous. So saddling fish only works if you are going to be riding on the surface. That's on top of the fish having a shape that allows for saddling. If you are going to be underwater, you'd better be horizontal and grab the animal by some means. If they have shark skin, you might be able to hold on to them (you'...


28

You can use superhydrophobic coating to define, on a suitable surface, a set of cages where the slimes will be bound. Use the coating to coat the zones where you don't want the slimes to go, and let the outer uncovered. Prevent the uncoated zones to form a connected set. Whenever they try to move out, the superhydrophobic surface will make for them ...


27

The city of Petra is a city in our world, in Jordan, that is carved out of a mountain. If we can do it here, I'm sure that, in a world with magic, even more examples could occur.


26

Reinforced concrete and structural steel are not so strongly directional as, for instance, carbon fibers. They would handle a change of load better than, for example, the suspension arm of a F1 car, which can withstand tons of load in the vertical direction but shatters with a minimal horizontal load. And if you think of it, it must be like that, unless you ...


26

4-5 years assuming near infinite money. You are looking at building another Three Gorges Dam. The Three Gorges Dam is a concrete gravity dam which is about as close as you can get to your wall (see clay below). Now the Three Gorges dam is almost twice as tall as you need, but your wall will be 16 times as long. Your wall is around 34-38km long, so saying ...


25

A Pithos The term in English is applied to such containers used among the civilizations that bordered the Mediterranean Sea in the Neolithic, the Bronze Age and the succeeding Iron Age. Pithoi had been used for bulk storage, primarily for fluids and grains; they were comparable to the drums, barrels and casks of recent times... The external ...


25

Here's a stock photo of Edinburgh. As you can see, there are a lot of fireplaces. (From www.dreamstime.com's royalty-free section). I used this photo as it is royalty free, but most tenements are in straight rows, not as messy as this A large part of the housing stock in Edinburgh is what we call tenements. A fairly typical tenement consists of a stair, ...


21

The sky-scraper would not even care Because otherwise people could bring down skyscrapers with their own bodyweight Think about it this way: If I run as fast as I can and jump against a wall, I can create more force than my usual body-weight due to gravity. Now - if a skyscraper could be brought down by some hundred people running and jumping against the ...


21

Modular Precast While everyone is talking about times for bridges and dams, it's not correct for a wall. A brick wall in a house is built of thousands individual bricks stacked together. There is no reason why the wall needs to be one solid piece like a dam. Individual self locking slabs/bricks could be cast at concrete plants around the country and ...


18

For one thing, hand holds do no good under high G. I can imagine the person flying down the corridor and going splat against a far wall, followed shortly by his fingers. I would have very short sections of hall. The farther you can travel the faster you're going when you hit. Since zigzags would make moving cargo a hideous experience and would really ...


17

When I first read this, I was reminded of a scene out of Fawlty Towers, where Basil and the Major are discussing the presence of a lapdog in the restaurant. Major - Filthy Creatures, I say. Basil - Indeed. It's a shame one can't store them in air-tight containers. Major - Well, he wouldn't be able to breathe then, would he Fawlty? Basil - He could try, ...


17

Let's assume you take a parallelepiped of pumice with vertical dimension h, width a and length c, and put it into water. To which extent will it sink? If we call the sinking s and indicate the density with $\rho$, it's easy to show that $s \over h$$=$$\rho_{pumice}\over \rho_{water}$. In order to prevent sinking when having a load of 1000 N, you need to ...


16

You can't get it all at once. The problem with that design in stone is you lose a lot of internal space and waste a lot of material.There has to be a wall under each of those external walls that runs all the way to the ground and further, so the lowest ring has to have three wall along the outside to support the floors above, it is a lot of wasted stone and ...


15

My solution would be to go with a conversion of what the Americans refer to as a "colonial" due to when they were built in the US. Use a building much older than the setting that was converted from a large single dwelling to apartment living but due to its age they kept the fireplaces rather convert to the latest and greatest of the date of conversion. Such ...


15

The closest real life example I can find is the Hoover dam Height 726.4 ft (221.4 m) Width (crest) 45 ft (14 m) Width (base) 660 ft (200 m) It is made of concrete. Since concrete heats and contracts as it cures, the potential for uneven cooling and contraction of the concrete posed a serious problem. Bureau of Reclamation engineers ...


14

Books do benefit from a controlled environment, but for relatively short times (a few decades), they won’t be badly damaged by the temperature in a house loft (unless you’re in a really bad part of the world, perhaps). So you may be overestimating the problem. But older books might be more fragile if they’ve not been made to more recent specs. However, the ...


13

Use Coral for the Spires You could have a giant or fast growing coral that you either use as building material (coral can be as hard as concrete) or use it as the building itself, that could look cool as well. A joint Building Project The mer could also get help from the humans to build the top of the sea-spires with the mer building the bottom. They ...


13

Currently, static oil rigs built on reinforced concrete towers are built in sea depths of up to 350 metres. This isn't the limit of the structural mechanics, but more of an economic limit. The deeper concrete structures are built using concave towers (thicker at the bottom and the top). The thicker top actually provides some buoyancy reducing the force on ...


13

Very quickly! There are approximately 315,000 construction firms in the UK with almost 3 million workers. You're on, basically, a wartime mobilisation of at least this sector of the economy (not to mention the food truck and port-a-john industries!). The city's area is 89 km2 with a perimeter of 356 km (assuming the firm of B.S. Johnson LLC have done the ...


13

I am sure that vaguely "Medieval" technology could build a structure like you describe out of stone, and/or brick, and/or tiles, and/or concrete, and/or wood, and/or other materials. You may have to modify some aspects of your design in order to keep other aspects, and thus may have to make some choices. I suggest that you take a look at plans (if ...


12

No, it won't work. The thermal expansion coefficient of granite is $7.9 - 8.4 \cdot 10^{-6} \ m/m K$, while for carbon fiber the value ranges around $1.6 - 2.1 \cdot 10^{-6} \ m/m K$. For comparison, steel has $11 - 12.5 \cdot 10^{-6} \ m/m K$ and concrete $13 - 14 \cdot 10^{-6} \ m/m K$. Therefore, while steel and concrete will nicely accommodate for ...


12

First of all, mountains are HUGE! Even a conservative estimate puts Mount Everest at a volume of 2.1 trillion cubic feet. That could fit all the buildings in Manhattan about 300-400 times over. This is way bigger than people can realistically fathom in terms of architecture; so, don't expect this palace to significantly hollow out the mountain. Instead ...


12

What you want is a circular ziggurat. Not any kind of ziggurat, but a hollow one with lots of internal space. That's because not all the ones built by the ancient were hollow in all layers. Anuway, this is Chogha Zanbil. It was finished around 1250 BC: This is a view from above: And this is an artistic rendering of it in its full glory: If the ancient ...


11

I am not sure why you expect to have stress on a space ship. During travel in space the only forces acting on a ship would be gravitation attraction from some attractor in the surrounding and the vectorial thrust of the rockets, if active. You would have no drag nor lift forces inducing torques on the structure. If your thrust vector is not passing through ...


11

You can definitely have a fireplace for each room. That is how they did it. A college dormitory is like an apartment house. Older dorms often had a fireplace for each room. Here is a dorm at Yale. Judging by the laptop this is recent. https://fyeahcooldormrooms.com/post/128888769089/yale-university In this photo of Burton Hall at Carleton, you can see ...


11

Forget ergonomic hallway design. Just use Electro-Magnets All of the interior surfaces within the ship, including all four walls of every hallway are made of magnetically attractable metals. All objects within the ship which are not permanently mounted to a fixed point in the ship, are skinned in a ferrous metal foil. All crew members are required to ...


11

One single cylindrical corridor that spirals the length of the ship. When you're accelerating it's a spiral ramp upwards/downwards When you're rotating then it's "level" (and long) When you're tumbling end over end down is at least meaningful most of the time (though you may have some issues near the centre of rotation). I will admit that I haven't ...


10

Ben Franklin solved your problem Behold: the Franklin Stove. The Franklin stove is a metal-lined fireplace named after Benjamin Franklin, who invented it in 1741.1 It had a hollow baffle near the rear (to transfer more heat from the fire to a room's air) and relied on an "inverted siphon" to draw the fire's hot fumes around the baffle.[2] It was intended ...


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