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162

You don't... exactly. The Poké Ball—er... hollow sphere—isn't actually containing the monster. It is merely the user-interface for a teleportation device to transport the monster from its nice (and environmentally conscious) pen to where you are (and back again later). Sure, you might need a Heisenberg compensator in order to "scale up" quantum tunneling ...


133

Build a Pyramid The Pyramids are halfway to your desired 10,000 year life span already. They are a little worse for wear, but they are definitely still standing. First, lets assess the criticism that the pyramids are not skyscrapers. The great pyramid at Giza (139m) was the tallest building in the world until the Lincoln Cathedral was completed in 1311. ...


89

The critical property for building a tower out of ivory (or any other material, for that matter) is its compressive strength. Strength data for ivory is surprisingly hard to find, and the few references I could find are for the tensile strength, not the compressive strength. Using human dentin as a proxy for elephant ivory, we can estimate the compressive ...


87

Basket beds. Beds made of long rigid elements will be polygonal. Baskets are made of flexible elements and so are round or ovoid. There are lots of basket beds for animals, even big dogs the size of children. Not for people though. I blame tradition. There is no reason one could not build a big round basket bed out of long flexible elements like reeds. ...


80

It's definitely possible in certain fantasy settings, some of which would even allow the tower to be carved from a single tusk.


78

The benefits and merits of using mecha are highly dependent on how big these mecha are. Under 9' Tall At the lowest end of the size scale, you have what is probably better coined powered armour. But mecha this big should be considered, if for no other reason than to illustrate where larger mecha sizes potentially don't have much use. A 90' tall isn't ...


71

Bundt cake pen. Frisky slimes gotta move! If it hits a dead end it will start looking for cracks or go up the wall. But if there is a path of least resistance the slime will take it. It will head off down the pan. Yes, it will circle around, but these are slimes. It will not know it has circled around. It will keep going, moving fast, feeling good, ...


63

Because of conservation of mass your monster beast will still weigh just as much before as after, so assuming the monster is actually inside it and you're not cheating your requirements, you're going to have rather large holes in your pockets from the larger members. This already seems like an issue. However we could, technically, compress the monsters. ...


63

Yes It isn't any different to occupants of a 2D world asking whether - if there were 3 dimensions - could we stack objects on top of each other in a third dimension? One thing to note, however, is that if the fourth spatial dimension exists then the buildings must have some size in the fourth dimension. As long as you space them accordingly along this ...


59

A super low tech alternative approach. Stairway to heaven. Build a nice tall stair case going from ground level up a good 5 or 6 floors then hang a birdcage a good 6 or 7 feet off the edge of the top landing. Maybe even hang some shiny bells on the cage. Just need enough noise and motion to keep the zombies motivated. How does it work? Well... Zombies ...


59

Well, you can go the operable wall way: police use this Tactical Training Grid to construct distinct scenarios to train policemen. I think you can do the same but with automatized walls in a grid, that moves and deploy according to the desired pattern. To compose the maze i suspect a lot of movements will be required, so this in action could be like a giant ...


58

Barring some form of setting specific contrivance, none. The goal in building an armoured fighting vehicle like a tank is to give it the best armour for its mass, to spread the weight out over the largest area you can so it has grip and won't sink into the ground, to give it the lowest profile you can so it is a difficult target and can hide behind terrain ...


57

Self-healing concrete. It works by embedding tiny capsules in the concrete containing bacterial spores. When the capsules are broken by water penetrating the concrete, the bacteria are released and begin to metabolise - and one of their waste products is calcite (a component in limestone). The calcite seals the crack, good as new. The technology is ...


55

The building itself is doable. Ivory is what teeth are made of, and they are made for compressive strength. You might need some architectural adjustments for load-bearing structures, to compensate for ivory's poor tensile strength. The tower is going to look decidedly romanesque, with barrel vaults and small windows. But, given the sheer amount of ivory ...


54

Glass jugs Make them big enough to accommodate your slimes; the slime should fill the bottom few inches and most of the jug should be empty space to prevent escapes. A slime that climbs up the wall can't pass the "upside-down" section to get to the entrance. Since it has no bones or structure, it won't be able to hold itself up the wall; so it will just ...


44

Big Trees Many beds historically had wood frames. Wood is easy to cut and provides a relatively stable building material. We cut wood into long rectangular pieces of lumber because most lumber trees aren't thick enough to cut 2X4's horizontally (and the wood isn't as strong in that direction ). However, if you have numerous trees of sufficient diameter ( ...


43

Such a city has been already built in reality, and it was even the capital of an empire: Venice The buildings of Venice are constructed on closely spaced wooden piles. Most of these piles are still intact after centuries of submersion. The foundations rest on plates of Istrian limestone placed on top of the piles, and buildings of brick or stone sit above ...


42

Thick floors with hydraulic pillars Given a grid made up of 30 to 50cm square pillars, each with an independent hydraulic piston and controller allowing it to either act as a full height pillar, even to the point of acting as stairs to the room above, or sit flush with the "floor", everything else is software. You'd need to define regions on each level ...


41

Water is 1000x denser than air, and much more viscous. So saddling fish only works if you are going to be riding on the surface. That's on top of the fish having a shape that allows for saddling. If you are going to be underwater, you'd better be horizontal and grab the animal by some means. If they have shark skin, you might be able to hold on to them (you'...


40

What about mosquito nets. It's easier to make a round net which would fit better on a round bed. See #4. But an even better drive would be some sort of natural circular construction material. Perhaps the shell of an animal used for food. Its shallow circular shell would be a great base for a bed. Require minimal carving and still be to curved for a good ...


38

Maybe the people of Szerika would choose to live in tents? Tents are easy to set up and pull down, they are assembled from smaller pieces, and they are made from materials (wood, rope, hides, cotton, ...) that is easy to transport because it is relatively light and not bulky. It is harder to imagine lots of multi-stories buildings made from tents, so I ...


38

Let's take a look at Kowloon Walled City - closest real world analog of what you're asking. Government There used to be somewhat competing gangs. There was, generally, a truce between them, and people who didn't belong to any gang was generally left alone. No taxes, no police. Small troubles were your troubles, big troubles were dealt with by the gang. Was ...


38

You have solar power, I presume you have reasonably intelligent robots, the solution is to take a clue from biology: Constantly, whether it is needed or not, replace every molecule of the space station with newly fabricated parts, smelt down the old parts, bring in new steel or whatever from asteroids. Make so no part of your station is ever more than 20 ...


37

I don't think an inanimate building is an option either. I'm going to admit this may not be within the technological scope you want, it certainly wouldn't exactly look the way you want and there are some real issues about why this would be a desirable choice, but if you're willing to stretch, how about a genetically modified tree. The current tallest ...


36

You are the master of your world, so yes. Some practical concerns: Your guests are only three-dimensional and would like to stay that way. How do you get them from one "hyperfloor" to the next? Well, you put them in a "hyperelevator" and move the whole room across. Peasy, easy. Are there alternate Earths under the other "hyperfloors"? You can answer ...


36

It takes a lot of energy to move the Earth In this question, I calculate the energy needed to move the Earth. In order to move the Earth by 1m in orbit, you will need to expend about $2\times10^{22}$ Joules. This is about five orders of magnitude greater than the largest atomic bomb, and only one order of magnitude less than the Chicxulub asteroid that ...


34

Update: The original version of this answer was based on an arithmetic error which underestimated the required material by factor 1000. It was subsequently rewritten. How do you define "Death Star"? Depending on what your space station is going to be capable of, there is no upper bound to how complicated the engineering challenges can become. But to ...


32

The regular options, as smithkm said, are pretty limited. I think the crux of the problem is this: Mechs are really complicated to build and incredibly specialist vehicles. But they have a form of chassis that is designed (by nature) to be incredibly generalist and adaptable. Perhaps to reconcile the two, we should try to pull them closer together. I'm ...


32

If reset time (and cost!) are not relevant, just tear it down and rebuild from scratch on every iteration. You can procedurally generate the blueprints by computer just like the actual games, perhaps using one of the games as-is.


30

If someone wanted to build such a thing, it would almost certainly be a pontoon bridge composed of floating sections joined together. The average depth of the Atlantic is about 3300 m so I doubt it would be feasible or cost-effective to drive supports into the ocean floor. (OTOH an artifical island on the mid-Atlantic ridge might be a useful anchor point.) ...


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