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10

The key would be that it needs to resonate with the people who speak it. One challenge I would make is that you will find the term "complex" to be a loaded one. What is complex to one person is simple to another. For a real-life example of the mismosh you talk about, consider English. English is famously difficult to learn as a second language because it'...


6

There are several ways to examine your question. In one sense, what you're really asking is "How Did English Arise?" English has a large phoneme inventory, an extreme almost unwieldy system of tense-aspect in verbs, a suprisingly large system of nominal & verbal adpositions, and excessively large lexicon, etc. On the other hand, what you're really ...


4

Short answer: NO. Medium answer: MAYBE, with a time machine. The basic issue here is one of chicken and egg and which came first. While, with chickens, we really do not and can not actually answer that question, on account of it being philosophical... With languages, and especially with invented languages, and most especially with a posteriori invented ...


3

"It is not clear when Interglossa ended and when Glosa began": The official position of Glosa.org, as given in History Behind Glosa, Wendy Ashby and Rainer Asenkerschbaumer, 2006, is that Glosa was developed from around 1960 to 1972 by Ron Clark and Wendy Ashby. I cannot resist quoting a truly sidereal fragment from that document, illustrating the profound ...


3

The key problem with a kitchen-sink language arising naturally is that native speakers have to learn the language, within a finite time and with a finite amount of input. A baby can learn how to pronounce the morphological building blocks of a language like English with its complex syllables, or Hawaiian with its many-syllable morphemes, or Thai with its ...


2

Isolation The more people have to learn a language as a second or third language, the fewer grammatical schemes or complex sounds they are going to learn. For example, if your language uses click sounds, and then you come into contact with another group that does not use those sounds, adults from the other group will have a difficult time learning to speak ...


2

If you've ever overheard a conversation between technical specialists such as doctors or engineers, you'll know how complex language arises. It comes about because humans share a grasp of a concept but lack a noun for it, so they invent one. Eventually systems are created to devise new nouns because of the sheer volume. Medicine leans on Latin gramma. ...


2

Create a culture where public debate and rhetoric play a very important role. Any conflicts (political, judicial and personal) are resolved through verbal debate. That means those people who have the best language skills will raise to the top of society. When words are weapons, you want to refine your arsenal. The more complex your grammar and the more ...


1

As usual for this type of questions, the usual disclaimer. The way you would go about creating a language depends severely on the purpose you want to put it to. If your goal is to just put a couple of alien-sounding words in a work of fiction, you can just invent them as you go along. If you want a conlang to communicate in, you can go by the frequency list -...


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