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55

The spell creates a force barrier that behaves like a non-Newtonian fluid. A non-Newtonian fluid is a fluid that, among other things, increases its viscosity with increased shear force. This video shows examples of interactions with a non-Newtonian fluid. A protection spell applies such dilatant properties to the atmosphere around the wizard. Ballistic ...


36

The Devil is in the Details. Your hypothetical mage's robe "parries all ballistic projectiles." When rain strikes the robe it does its job, reducing the drops to zero velocity so that they do not penetrate. However, this has an unwanted side effect of that they are no longer ballistic in nature. As a result, the robe is now, for all intents and purposes, ...


15

It's because you are looking at two different phenomena. Anything gets wet because of capillary forces and surface tension. Both phenomena have nothing to do with stopping ballistic projectiles. It's like asking "why do I get wet though my sweater is pink?"


14

The magical robe also magically perceives intent. Enemy projectiles? Blocked. Harmless raindrops falling from a benign sky? Come on through. Angry raindrops from an insulted deity? Blocked! Additionally, this could optionally add a fun wrinkle where an "accidental" projectile, say friendly fire or a alchemical explosion, could actually become very deadly ...


7

This brings to mind the personal force shields from Frank Herbert's Dune series. These shields (note that, despite the name, it's a force field encompassing half or all of the wearer's body, not a "strapped to your arm" shield) resist incoming objects with a force proportional to the energy of the incoming object. A bullet, or even a quick blade thrust, is ...


4

Well, I once wore a bullet-proof vest and it was raining. The vest got wet. No one shot me, but I'm pretty sure that if they had, it would have protected me. This is because rain is expressly not bullets. Rain and bullets don't work on the same principles. However, a bullet-proof vest and mage's robe (as you have it) don't seem to work the same way ...


3

Too many projectiles Magic is computable. Each spell is like a computer program, and an enchanted object is like a computer. Unless the enemy attack completely overwhelm the battlemage in term of magic strength, the robe should survive unscathed. The rain overwhelms the robe's capacity to process ballistic trajectories. A few droplets do get deflected, ...


3

Probably yes. Provided that (a) they indigenous people's magical capabilities are incapable of destroying your weapons, and (b) the colonists are a united people, then by all means yes. As you pointed out, the main problem with these weapons is that they are glass cannons; they are "capable of going through armor like a knife through butter", but they have ...


3

Protection of this sort needs to have a lower limit: if it didn't, air itself would be sealed away, and the mage would suffocate in his own protective magic. Given that such a lower limit must exist, a robe tuned so that bullets are stopped would still allow rain through: raindrops hitting the magic would (at worst) atomize into a fine mist that passes ...


2

Your cloak selectively blocks targets according to speed and size. A raindrop usually won't reach speeds greater than 10 meters per second, while the slowest bullet will travel at speeds superior to 300 meters per second. Even arrows from bows or crossbows can top at higher speeds. That means the cloak selects what it will parry and what it will avoid based ...


2

Frame challenge: What if instead of blocking bullets, the robe magically caused the wizard to dodge them? I.e.: it gives him superior predictive capabilities to know exactly where every bullet and arrow is going to be and aids his reflexes (or just physically pushes him out of the way - think of Doctor Strange's robe. Sure this might interfere or distract ...


2

The enchantment on the robe makes the fibers of the robe invulnerable. In order for an arrow or crossbow bolt to pierce the mage, it would have to sever strands of the fibers that make up the cloth the robe is made of. The magical enchantment on the robe makes that impossible. If the cloth is sufficiently thick enough, or has padding, it will absorb the ...


2

Almost certainly not. While the technological disparity with insurgencies is not to this degree, the resource disparity is similar. What did the US Army want when they were at war in Iraq? They didn't want more M1 tanks, even though they were essentially immune to RPGs and all but the most powerful IEDs, they started producing MRAPs that were cheaper to ...


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