156

Firstly, if you don't have the capabilities to construct a closed life support system, then you have no business trying to construct a colony many light years away, with no support and no backup and no actual certainty that the world is safe or habitable ahead of time. Your colony ship either needs to be a habitat suitable for a decent number of people to ...


58

Rockets Rockets are the fastest means of acceleration we have but it's just not efficient but for a stargate, this isn't a problem as you can open the gate to refuel. You effectively build the stargate into a ship and use the gate to refuel and resupply. Crew can come and go as wanted. As tech improves, you bring it through the gate and upgrade the ship ...


42

The first thing to examine is, what are those "Byzantines"? Are they for-real Byzantines, that is, inhabitants of the city on the Bosphorus from the 7th century BCE to the 4th century CE? Are they Constantinopolitans, that is, inhabitants of the city on the Bosphorus from the 4th century CE onwards? (Nobody called the Byzantine Empire the Byzantine Empire ...


26

I think that the number one priority is actually going to be confirming that the planet is, in fact, as habitable as previously anticipated. Previous information on the planet took 500 years to get here; we don't know how fast we were traveling, but I assume it was a relativistic speed (IE a significant percentage of the speed of light). As such, all data ...


18

Short answer: HELL NO Surface temperatures on Venus approach a toasty 900degF (~475degC). Though heat is radiated from the planet, there is no surface cooling as on Earth. Venus has volcanoes and presumably some amount of radioactive decay and probably a hot metal core, much like Earth. There's no "sweet spot" anywhere close to that planet. Closer than ...


18

The answer could be anything between "the pronunciation is a bit different" to "each corner of the continent has a completely different language". Let's have a few real-life examples. The colonization of America by European immigrants began roughly in the year 1500. Because the immigrants came from different countries, they had different languages, but ...


13

Basically anywhere* location must be able to facilitate easy access to space Stellar technology implies easy access to large amounts of energy, and therefore the ability to fuel high-energy drives to get into space. While basically anywhere can work, to make logistics and potentially building space access megastructures (if any) easier, I would recommend ...


13

The two answers you already have are correct, but I think it is worth the time to add some more details. The Question After all, the idea is quite reasonable. Anyone who has been in a cave knows that it initially gets colder as you go down. Similarly, my native Florida is practically the land of springs, and anyone who has visited one knows that they are ...


13

FTL isn't the issue The problem is finding somewhere to live. The Milky Way has around four hundred billion stars alone so if you look at a star system every second, it will take you over 200 years to get through it all. Now on top of that, chances are your destination will require terraforming which won't be a quick process nor a cheap process. This ...


12

As Arkenstein implied in their comment: No The surface temperature of Venus is uniform. It does not get any cooler as one approaches the poles, or at night, or any of the variety of things that change temperature here on earth. There is therefore no way for the temperature to get any cooler beneath its surface; any heat sink capacity has been used up for ...


12

It seems your only option is to utilise slower-than-light travel to get your Stargate to the each world you wish to connect to. Once it's there you can dial it up and use the wormhole to start sending through people and supplies to establish a colony. Once that's established you can start using that as a jumping-off point for the next Stargate seeding ...


11

In your case, an unrecognizable dialect is almost guaranteed. The Scenario Many other answers seems to sort of glaze by this and speak about language evolution in a broader since, but you have 1 ship of people vs an entire continent. Even if your Byzantines had assault rifles, and the natives were fighting with sticks and rock, the number disparity is too ...


10

Beer has a slightly lower freezing point than water, and is less corrosive to the electrical contacts than salt water with the same freezing point. Even better, beer can be made dark as part of the regular process (simply by roasting some of the malt longer/hotter). Therefore, the same liquid can be used in its varifocal role, as a filter against excessive ...


10

Based on the initial conditions identified in your question - but also in the comments - the 50 figure is the most realistic. Your population will not be able to resume the practice of agriculture or animal husbandry, if they are limited to "the contents of their pockets". This leaves behind the entire basis for agriculture. Without seeds, they have no ...


10

I believe the top priorities, in order, will be: Food and water. Once stored victuals run out, there will have to be local sources for food and water. Food might be adapted from local lifeforms, or the colonists can begin growing crops from seeds, etc., brought from home. Shelter. Shelter from wind, rain, and cold will be the second priority, once the ...


10

Good answers from a lot of people, but I can see one flaw: The premise that only one ship will be sent. What civilization will only send one ship on a one-way 500-year journey? Surely in 500 years other ships would also be sent to the same destination. Some of these might well be faster and could therefore arrive before the original vessel even gets there....


8

You said that when an object passes through a pair of stargates, then its velocity will also be transferred. So with some applied orbital dynamics and multiple pairs of stargates which you send through each other, you might be able to reach some really impressive speeds. Create a pair of large stargates (1A and 1B). Place 1A on a very large orbit around ...


7

The colonists’ language wouldn't change very much in 500 years. Small populations have slow language change, because they don’t have the diversity and the sheer number of people for much linguistic innovation. For example, Icelanders can still read and understand 10th century Norse sagas because the language hasn’t evolved beyond comprehensibility in a ...


6

if after 500 years, another ship arrives from Byzantium, would the Byzantines be able to understand the language of the colonists, or would the two varieties of Greek have diverged so much by this point that the groups would not be able to understand each other? OK, I'm not a linguist. So, I can't say how or how much would language change in 500 years after ...


6

The Korean Peninsula Let's start with the basics; to support a large city you need water and food. The Korean Peninsula isn't known for its abundance of arable land because of the mountains (but we'll get to those) but there is still enough arable land to support a colony of the size you describe. It's estimated that around 22% of South Korea's landmass is ...


6

Not long at all, depending on political and economic will. You have instantaneous FTL and the capacity to build (presumably pretty good) space stations. You can ‘colonise’ literally as fast as you can build cheap stations with a one-shot FTL Drive and pop them to another star. If the first country to colonise a system gets to claim it you can expect things ...


5

Depending on what you mean by 'Terraformed', anywhere from 100 years to more. Your terraforming process needs to have not just converted the composition of the atmosphere to a similar composition to Earth, but to also: Ensured the phosphates in the soil are removed Ensured the planet has a similar atmospheric pressure Ensure constant rainfall (but not too ...


5

Since travel is instantaneous, the real question is economic. Basically it is the time and resources it takes to build FTL vehicles, and the time it takes to transport sufficient personnel, materiel and equipment to settle a solar system. Essentially assume a long-term economic growth of around one percent (1%) per annum. This is, from memory, the long-term ...


5

The top priority will be fertility. They will need 3-5 children per couple, perhaps more if the planet is dangerous (native life, environment, whatever). With only 500 people, that's not nearly enough to bring along all the specialties required for a modern civilization... Charles Stross has speculated on his blog that that's north of 100,000 distinct, ...


4

Kind of? Despite what others said, temperature is not actually your problem. Pressure is. The pressure on surface is over 90 times what you want inside your habitats. Not to mention that pressure comes in the form of super critical carbon dioxide at 740 kelvins. What this means is that the ratio of temperature difference is smaller than the ratio of ...


4

Stay in space After generations, the spacegoers are culturally adapted to living in space. They can build and maintain their habitats, can gather resources they need, and can maintain a human society. Else they would have died out. They already solved all the hard problems of survival. So settling a planet is optional to them. Nobody alive has lived on a ...


4

Don't expect it to happen anytime soon (100's of years). Skeptical answer is to expect it (complete terraforming of Mars) to not happen at all. As per Wikipedia and Space.com the atmosphere of Mars is 95% carbon dioxide (== no oxygen) atmosphere is 100 times thinner than earth (== no air) Average temperature at equator of atmospher is 5 degree centigrade (=...


3

Windpower, geothermal, beamed power, fission and fusion The kind of planet you are describing is a super-earth or mini-neptune. Given its location it will have a substantial hydrogen atmosphere and a significant part of its mass will be ices (water, ammonia and methane). If there is a surface, it will be an ice desert under a high pressure atmosphere, kind ...


3

Cripes! Your mad scientist comes from Alice Springs. He'd know about saltbush. It's native to the Australian Outback. If he can do time travel, then breeding salt-resistant plants will be easy. Why bother with 6% of the planet's surface. Seed the 94% of the planet's surfave with haline-tolerant plants. After 400 million years of a well vegetated world &...


3

Will they understand each other? Maybe? A little? Take a look at English. 600 years ago, Chaucer wrote this paragraph: Wepyng and waylyng, care and oother sorwe I knowe ynogh, on even and a-morwe,' Quod the Marchant, 'and so doon oother mo That wedded been.' (copied from Wikipedia) Some of it is familiar to us ("Merchant"). Some of it we could ...


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