4

From space. Check the seasons. This can be done with computer modelling and space scanning. You want a place that has warm summers, cool winters, minimal rain, and few storms. If a place is filled with storms, is too hot, is too cold, or is constantly raining colonization will be harder. This can be done with a few satellites. Check if there are any ...


3

Send people and see if they survive. Make sure they pack a lot of guns for negotiating with fellow Earthlings or perhaps native fauna, and maybe a dust mask, sunscreen, some rations... In your scenario, there is a whole other planet of resources waiting to be taken. Every minute you wait is a minute someone else could be planting their silly flags and ...


3

I'll preface this by saying that I personally don't believe Antartica can be a suitable living environment within 80 years unless something truly cataclysmic and natural-occurring changed our entire planet's weather and eco structure. But...saying it did... Logically the peninsula would be the popular starting point for settlers, since it's the warmest, ...


2

the cosmic abundance of uranium-238 is 1 to 1 trillion particles. It seems like very rare, but let's roll some numbers. The mass of Earth is $5.9 \times 10^{24}$ kg. The molar mass of iron is 55, meaning that a mole of iron has a mass of 55 grams. That means that, roughly speaking, Earth is made of $10^{26}$ moles of iron, if it was made of entirely iron. ...


1

Supernovae and planet age The abundancy of Uranium and other heavy elements depends on the proximity of supernovae at the time your planet was formed from the proto-planetary disk. It also depends on the age and development stage of your planet. My answer is mainly a link, https://world-nuclear.org/information-library/nuclear-fuel-cycle/uranium-resources/the-...


1

The most important question is "does the planet in question have abundant oxidizers?" Uranium Oxide Heavy metals, left to their own devices, tend to sink towards a planet's core. But uranium oxides, fluorides, and chlorides are all much less dense. So as long as, during the early stages of the planet's formation, these compounds form (or arrive ...


1

Its not a one way problem i.e there are two issues at play. The first is your question. Is it safe for humans (and related Terran lifeforms) to colonize this planet. But the second question is potentially of equal importance. And that's 'is it safe for the ecology of the planet for humans it colonize it'. This second question is important only because the ...


1

For one thing, they could read a scientific discussion about what makes a planet habitable for humans in particular, instead of for liquid water using lifeforms in general. Even on Earth, there are many environments with life where unprotected humans would swiftly die. As far as I know the main scientific discussion of the requirement for a planet to be ...


1

Drones and probes ad libitum. First of all, you need to determine if there are any organisms or substances which can be directly harmful. This means you need to take and analyze samples. And for this a drone or a probe is better suited. In parallel you need to determine if you can find anything to support the colony on site, or you need to bring everything ...


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