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This question makes me think of Estelle from Arknights. (I don't know how to put pictures in a question or answer on SE, sadly, so you'll have to find it yourself). The spike-like horns on her brow could be accounted for with simple holes in the helmet. However, the big, curved horns on the side of her head would be quite a bit more difficult. A clamshell ...


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Cut, Burn, & Cover: FRAME SHIFT: As fanatical as we Minnesotans might be about our Vikings, horns would be a serious impediment to normal human behavior. Actual Vikings did NOT wear horned helmets, because they were impractical and would provide leverage in combat, so a blow against the very broad horns might twist or break a warrior's neck. If those ...


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The wizard's robes work on the same principle as the force fields from Dune In Dune it is said that one of the key things that triggers personal force fields is kinetic energy moving beyond a particular threshold. This is why everyone in Dune fights melee battles using swords despite being in the far futures where more advanced firearms like laser guns are a ...


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So I looked into it a bit, and I was being silly. You only need iron for a Faraday cage if you want to stop radiowaves, copper works fine for electricity, since it's far more conductive than saltwater. So there's no need to cover iron with water-proof layers (since as mentioned, iron covered in rust loses its effect). With mucus, it's a neat idea. But, fish ...


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Sea water, with its saline content, is a good conductor. If the merpeople can insulate themselves from the water, they are relatively safe, as the electricity will prefer the path of least resistance given in this case by water. Therefore your merpeople just need to secrete an oily mucus covering their bodies, which will keep them physically separated from ...


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