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0

Almost certainly not. But you might be able to get close. Posit a runaway greenhouse event. CO2 goes way up, oceans heat up, water gets in atmosphere, repeat and oceans boil, and it spirals upwards until the surface of the planet is well over boiling everywhere. This might be triggered by a spike the sun's radiation output. If the sun radiation output ...


2

No 98% of all the landmass is wasteland/desert Kinda hard when when ocean levels remain the same. Too much liquid water around. There are only two climate zones, hot and dry around the equator and cold and dry on the poles Blockquote Hot + dry = evaporation and evaporation means rain. If everything was either cold and dry or frozen and dry, that ...


-1

The ozone layer disappears. This could be a result of human activity and perhaps what prompted their departure. Without ozone all the UV light from the sun hits the surface of the Earth. The surface is sterilized by UV. Reduced carbon on the surface (plant remains etc) slowly oxidizes, consuming remaining O2 and producing CO2. As CO2 levels rise the ...


1

I think you have a stilted version of what our CO2-induced climate change is actually doing. In a super short time we've shot up from about 200PPM to 400 (and still going straight up). In the Jurassic and Triassic, it bobbled around 2-3 thousand. During the Cambrian is was typically more like 4.5 thousand. Average temperatures in those eras were much ...


10

No. The mass extinction you're hoping for—no plants and only microscopic animals—is impossible from these conditions. At the point that humans left the planet, it was possible for animal and plant life to exist, even if it was limited to certain areas. Because otherwise, they'd be dead before they left. Once humans were gone, they stopped their ...


3

Ocean level is about same as today and still contain some life down really deep, but all the streams are dead Neither of these statements make sense. Currently, about 10% of the planet is covered with ice (polar ice caps plus glacial ice) and the sea level is where it is. During the most recent ice age, the planet was covered to about 30% with ice. The ...


1

The Permian-Triassic Extinction Event (AKA End-Permian Event or The Great Dying) is the largest known extinction event, occurring 250 million years ago. An estimated 96% of all on earth was wiped out in this event (The K-T extinction, aka The Dinosaur One, by comparison, was 75% of all life). While it is still unknown what specifically brought on the event,...


0

Most of the criteria you're describing can be met, but the mechanism you're thinking of isn't going to do it. Pollution and Global Warming aren't ever going to create the desert wasteland you're thinking of, but there's another solution. if you want a desolate wasteland with no plants and no animals, you need to blot out the sun COMPLETELY for a good long ...


17

You're positing a world that has no surface plants. That's... implausible. There are plants out there that can manage climatic extremes far worse than anything humans could live through. Plants actively thrive in concentrations of CO2 that humans would find lethal. You might easily have a massive die-off as climate change modified local conditions, but ...


1

I think there is one direction you could pursue. Climate cannot explain the seas being dead "except very deep". That sounds more like poison killing all the algae. This also matches the drop in oxygen level. Now assume that the poison is lighter than water. It would then form a thin layer on the surface of the oceans. This would drastically cut down ...


12

The surface conditions you're describing are closer to an ice age than any other situation. In practice the ice caps covered only 35% of the land mass, though they locked up the vast majority of the fresh water. This means that the ice age was one of the driest periods in the planet's history. The more of the water that's locked up in the poles the drier ...


2

I agree with Dutch's answer in the main, but there is an important element that is not discussed in his answer which I want to bring up; Thermal Mass. Put simply, thermal mass is the same as a heat sink; it absorbs heat readily and in massive quantities, releasing it over time when the ambient temperature is lower. The earth is mostly covered in one of the ...


43

•98% of all the landmass is wasteland/desert •The two poles are some big chunks of ice, each covering about 20% of earths area This is rather confusing. Yes, I get that there are also cold deserts, but next to the glacier there will be the melting zone, where the bonanza of water will inevitably favor life. •There are only two climate zones, hot ...


7

Let's be clear; if equatorial temperatures are already around 100oC, humans have been dead for some time. There's absolutely no chance of humans surviving in a world of those temperatures, even with climate controlled suits, and even if they DID, they'd no longer have the social and economic structures to achieve the mega-engineering projects you're ...


2

Removing "all traces" might be difficult: mining endeavours delve into layers hundreds of millions of years old, so you'd need to wait at least that long for new crust to be formed and intact mineral deposits to reappear. Even so, very old cratons would survive and their isotopic ratio and composition might give the game away. Unless you had the ...


0

One way I can think of is induced amnesia. The idea is to repeat the Adam and Eve creation in Eden. Selected couples are chosen for the next generations. A drug therapy wipes-out their memory. That makes them think they have been just created by God, or a god of some sort. They are taken care of within the depths of a jungle with good conditions to start a ...


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