Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

New answers tagged

0

You could potentially get away with destroying a larger city with a smaller meteor if you took advantage of a knock on effect from something else being destroyed. An example of this: A very large dam upstream of the city is destroyed by the meteor, causing a catastrophic flood that washes most of the city away.


3

As noted, Barringer (Meteor) Crater provides an easily observable benchmark: a 1.2 km crater would be the result of an explosion large enough that you could assume everything within tens of kilometers would be flattened, and right there is even a very large modern city. For another comparison, Tunguska. The airburst was somewhere between 10 and 30 ...


2

Something like the Tunguska event might be suitable. I believe directly under the blast trees were left standing so someone in the city in a deep basement might well have survived https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tunguska_event


10

Keep it small First, we need to know the area that must be destroyed: Pompeii covered a total of 64 to 67 hectares (170 acres) and was home to 11,000 to 11,500 people -Wikipedia So you need a radius of total destruction of only about 400 m. That's very small. Second, let's look at the equivalent kind of nuclear detonation will have a 100 % casualty ...


6

Let's say something similar in size to Pompeii. This sounds like a job for nukemap. Here's an example detonation of a 15kt yield device, equivalent to the "Little Boy" device used on Hiroshima. The effects of a surface blast are shown, without showing thermal effects which will be quite different for a meterorite impact than for a nuclear explosion. As ...


3

House-sized meteor. City-sized crater. A good starting point is the nuclear bomb that dropped on Hiroshima. The blast was city-sized as opposed to country-sized. It had about $6 \times 10^{13}$ Joules of total energy.$^1$ So we know that's not enough for significant secondary effects. We want a meteor with a similar energy total. The kinetic energy of the ...


5

I think you can bail out of this problem with an object similar to the one which created the meteor crater Meteor Crater lies at an elevation of 5,640 ft (1,719 m) above sea level. It is about 3,900 ft (1,200 m) in diameter, some 560 ft (170 m) deep, and is surrounded by a rim that rises 148 ft (45 m) above the surrounding plains. Though the crater ...


5

Look at history La Cosa Nostra, Triads, Yakuza, Unione Corse - looking at the historic examples of large crime organisations they have a few common characteristics: They are crime organisations, not just a bunch of people who commit crimes together. They have significant support from a large cultural / national / social group in the wider population. ...


1

Time and Evolutionary Pressure The gangs might start as kids in the 'hood, shaking down their peers for protection money and selling penny-packets of drugs for larger wholesalers. As they grow up, many grow out of juvenile delinquency and into more responsible lifestyles. This is an age thing, not just an ethnic thing, except that white frat boys find a ...


3

You will use landmarks. https://www.theguardian.com/travel/2017/aug/01/canterbury-kent-walk-medieval-streets-attractions-cathedral Depicted: Canterbury cathedral. It has been there a long time. Most towns of any size in the period would have at least one church - if not a cathedral, some built thing with bell towers. At altitude it would be visible from ...


1

Interesting question. If your which lives in a larger city, for example London (in 1417, Sir Henry Barton, Lord Mayor of London, ordained "lanterns with lights to be hung out on the winter evenings between Hallowtide and Candlemasse.") or Paris (in the beginning of the 16th century, the inhabitants were ordered to keep lights burning in the windows of all ...


16

Three factors enter into how well you can see a medieval city from the air at night. First, outdoor lighting is almost exclusively torches and oil/fat lamps (depending on the situation). These aren't very bright, compared to modern streetlights or yard lights. Second, due to cost, such lighting is likely to be as sparse as it can be, without too much ...


1

Technological reform without social reform can be less than successful. You know why we call plumbing by that name? The word literally comes from the Latin for Lead; they used the metal for their water management throughout the empire because it was cheap, malleable and easy to manage as a resource. There is some evidence available to say that the Romans ...


1

Older communities tended to cluster near trade routes or key resources - agricultural, mineral, industrial, services, etc. Sometimes the locations of these key resources determined where the trade route ran. Older communities cared more about access to water for living and trade, but they lacked alternatives. We do have alternatives now, and interstellar ...


5

Unless your tech level is dramatically above the present day, consideration for settlements should be the same as they were throughout the Earth's history. Following factors may be considered prime: Access to fresh water; Access to food; Access to transportation; Availability of room to expand; Natural habitability (good climate, lack of natural disasters);...


3

You've done well to consider resource location as a primary concern. You might consider a few things as well. Every colony will need to have some stuff coming in, and will definitely have stuff going out. You need to consider what resources you need to draw on as well as how to deal with waste. Water. I would give consideration to the locations of ...


Top 50 recent answers are included