Hot answers tagged

58

Make someone overreact So you swim to North Korea (hopefully the tank was not too far). Once there, you regroup in the shape of a submarine and you slowly approach any US/Japanese/Chinese/North Korean/South Korean warship you can find. Hope someone overreact and press the wrong button. If not, try again. Playing with nerves Also every time you see ...


47

Let's shut down and/or melt-down some nuclear power plants. Heck if some brainless Swedish jellyfish could do it in 2013, surely a gang of criminal salmon can manage!


41

This answer may be voted as non-responsive, but I think your question may be missing your point. You assert that "filtering out" the unimportant stimulus is a sign of slow or incomplete processing. Instead, I consider it to be a very high-speed approach to eliminating unimportant inputs and allowing the situational intelligence to focus on the unexpected,...


27

a machine that perfectly maps out the way in which neurons fire in Patient A regarding a certain memory, and then to stimulate an identical firing of neurons in Patient B, so as to allow them to live that memory or even believe it to be theirs? This can only work if the wiring of the neurons in our brain is standardized and homogeneous like the circuitry in ...


13

What harm can they do? Not much. They lack arms/hands and legs/feet. Their ways of communicating will be limited, and whatever they come up with according forcing them to work together to learn to communicate that will be some form of communication which works for the giants fish tanks they're being held in. Not a vast ocean. Besides, most species of ...


11

Few minutes (4 to 5) of anoxia (lack of oxygen supply) are sufficient to cause permanent damage to neurons, compromising a brain's functionality. https://www.spinalcord.com/anoxic-brain-injury On average, the brain can survive a mere four minutes without oxygen, so if you suspect a stroke or other injury that is cutting off oxygen to the brain, you need ...


10

Die, and be reborn. In general, if you have stuff, you can maintain what you have. Or you can throw it out when it is worn and get new. Our bodies do both. Epithelial cells (like skin) fulfills its task and then dies and is sloughed. Blood cells live their lives and then die and are recycled. Neurons are not recycled. They are long lived, and so are ...


10

A good example will be Octopus. The octopus (along with cuttlefish) has the highest brain-to-body mass ratios of all invertebrates; it is also greater than that of many vertebrates. It has a highly complex nervous system, only part of which is localised in its brain, which is contained in a cartilaginous capsule. Two-thirds of an octopus's neurons are ...


9

To "replicate such firing" is, as noted, impossible in 2 different brains. They are just too different. However, consider that right now, you are reading these words and my thoughts are becoming your thoughts. We have both spent years learning English in order that these formations of black and white pixels fire the correct neurons. This learning process ...


9

Well, I'm sorry to say, but the world as you know it, is in deeper trouble than you think. The fishes just need to follow a simple 2-step process. Step 1: Try to get back into a human body. Given that "The business of mind storage [has] become a profitable one", it would be fair to assume that the technology to do so would be fairly easily accessible. So ...


9

Reality check: Not Gonna Happen Keeping a brain alive is a rather trivial exercise and Brythan's answer provides two common modes of feeding people who can't feed themselves. It's a "trivial exercise" because TPN and G-Tubes are placed in living bodies whose metabolic functions are working properly. But Bill is looking to do something radically different ...


9

Falling down a K hole. It is hard to keep from responding to the world - especially if someone hurts you to see if you are faking. But it is a lot easier with drugs. Ketamine is used to achieve this state. https://www.verywellmind.com/what-is-a-k-hole-21861 Ketamine is a dissociative drug. In simple terms, dissociative drugs make users feel detached ...


8

Your super smart Salmon want to cause chaos so what they do is abduct highly aggressive species and forcefully migrate them into environments where they have an abundance of food and not many natural predators. Eventually the ecosystem in these areas are ruined leading to a collapse in the supply of seafood causing seafood prices to spike and the lack of ...


8

My cat sleeps all the time... I'm going to advocate that sleep need not be lost in your circumstances. The Circadian rhythm is convenient, but I'm not convinced my cat knows what it is. Or, perhaps, our Latin brothers and sisters, who enjoy siesta. Rest can come at any time, whether through sleep or meditation. However, as I think about it, it's not ...


8

I think it's more than just the world the creature lives in you also need to account for their habits and the their place in the ecosystem to that end I believe you need to start with a warm-blooded obligate carnivore, such creatures are almost always on the hunt for the next meal as it is. Then you need to put them in the middle of the foodchain rather than ...


7

No, each person brain is different and the map from one will not produce the same results in another. Due to plasticity and how each brain is individually trained to your sensory organs and experiences each memory in each brain is unique. Each brain a has a unique map of connections called a Connectome. A perfect copy of someone else's memory would require ...


7

Scarcity of resources is a fact we have to deal with, no matter if we are someone with an IQ of 200 or an amoeba in a muddy puddle. From scarcity of resources follow an economy principle: you use something only if the cost is justified, else it is just a waste of scarce resources. So, for example, if you are an organism living in an underground lake, eyes ...


6

Through a bacteria, virus, prion or other diseases If you've seen the news stories of Zombie Deer, then you know about prion diseases. Mad Cow Disease is another example. There is also a fungus which takes control of an ant's nervous system. The tick is a carrier and has a symbiotic relationship with the disease. Much like the ant zombie fungus, it's ...


6

Retrograde amnesia is perfectly reasonable side-effect of the procedure itself. There would be considerable physical trauma to the brain from being removed and implanted. Hypoxia would be likely during the process. Blood circulation would almost certainly have suffered at several points. All of these can cause amnesia if they happen to relevant parts of the ...


6

Although L. Dutch's answer probably contains all the information you need, I think it would also be important to take into account the manner of the person's death. If an elderly person passes away in their sleep, I would guess that their memories would be readable for longer than someone who fell down a cliff and died of concussion, especially if they ...


5

Circadian rhythms regulate the timing of sleep. They do not create the need for it. A body in an area without day-night cycles would still require sleep. People and animals who lived in Arctic regions before artificial light still slept in the height of summer or winter, as well as year-round, despite drastic changes in the amount of sun each day. People ...


5

I think the key is to stop thinking like a fish....it offers them very few advantages. The only thing they should worry about as salmon is how to stop being salmon. Head to a touristy destination where people rent canoes or kayaks and make a coordinated effort to cause one of them to drop their cellphone. Many phones are waterproof to some reasonable ...


5

Shutdown the Internet Well, that is a unlikely action to be performed by salmons because of their lack of sharp whatever, but beside this most to all communication across the oceans is backboned by water-cables. While I still don't think that a salmon might be able to nibble through an intact water cable, at least they could give it a try. If that fails ...


5

This is basically what the brain already does, but ramped up to 11 and in control of the conscious mind. The problem is that this requires a very specific mind. During development your brain makes millions of connections with other parts of the brains, then at some point it starts to purposefully remove many of these, leaving the most used neural pathways ...


5

I can't understand how should be possible that a brain can integrate with logical gates. ... But now, even newest working chips still operate with 0 and 1 and logical gates So do neurons. You might think your wetware is analogue, but nerves don't actually work that way. The magic phrase you need to know is action potential, possibly along with voltage-...


4

Your nervous system is more distributed than originally believed, but the degree to which this is true is still a bit uncertain despite it being a major point of study since the early 1800s. What is known is that the human spine contains the majority of your body's reflexive functions and motor memory effectively making your spinal cord part of a sort of ...


4

A less centralized nervous system is an anatomical feature seen in non-uplifted animals in real Earth. For example, insects have brains, but they also have neural ganglia distributed through their bodies. These ganglia are responsible for functions which in us are all processed in the head, such as locomotion and gut movements. And then there is the ...


4

So my question is what could replace sleep as a restorative process for their bodies? Entropy would still cause their cells/neurons to degenerate, and so I imagine they would still need some kind of regular, restorative process to keep them functioning. The thing is, we don't actually know that sleep does this for us. It's a popular theory, but we don't ...


4

Most of the information filtered out is next to useless. For instance, if you have ever seen "Tracers" in movies where they are showing people taking drugs, that's an actual thing, not a hallucination--your eyes do not have perfect resolution or response speed. When something moves in front of your eyes it takes a while to fade--your brain figured this out ...


4

Yes. But it’s going to take some backstory for me to explain. We don’t know the source of consciousness. There is a theory (based on data) that our brains have a quantum entanglement component that would make them un-copyable because you could never recreate the same entanglements. This theory says that once a mind is instantiated in any medium, that ...


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