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Your tendons may not be the best spring material but whatever you use, a high water content will reduce the recoil velocity of the material. Perhaps you can consider using muscles instead. Hummingbird wing muscles are composed exclusively of fast oxidative-glycolytic fibers (type IIa), with giant mitochondria occupying ∼50% of total volume. They respond ...


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(liquid) Butane Breath! Butane is a simple chemical, not too difficult to synthesize. It is quite believable to handwave a biological organ that creates and concentrates Butane inside your Dragon. It is not even greatly toxic! At room temperature, you only need about 2 Atmospheres of pressure to keep Butane in liquid form. Now granted, putting a 2-bar ...


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Corona/bacterial breath Komodo dragons harbor bacteria in their teeth which may cause sepsis on a victim. So even if prey survives a bite and flees, the dragon may still feast on a corpse later. Dial it up to 11 with your dragons. They don't need to spit fire, lightning or acid in order to kill a lot of people. They just need to breathe like regular humans ...


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The best type of breath would be an acid, preferably fluoroantimonic acid, a acid that is so strong that it will separe the electrons from your hands( hydrolisis) and furthermore it will sear the skin off your hand( this only in a small quantity). If it were a high proportion of it, if it touched your arm it would eat through skin, flesh and erode the bone. ...


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Archery Bird: Okay, this is mostly for fun, but if you have a flying animal who needs to suddenly launch themselves in the air with a spring mechanism, why not? The Archery bird's beak is long, stiff, and it can dislocate it's lower beak, then lock it back into place sideways using great force applied by small wing hooks. additionally, the beak has a long ...


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If you want acidic breath, I'd suggest hydrofluoric acid (HF) for maximum nastiness. This stuff can be corrosive in high concentrations, but that's only a small part of the damage it can do. Even a low-level exposure is dangerous, and it's not obvious until too late that it's a problem. HF doubles as a contact poison, penetrating skin easily and wrecking ...


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Caustic, digesting, nasty spit The most plausible "breath" weapon is the one that already exists in the animal kingdom. It's called "having something nasty spat at you", and several snake species (generically known as "spitting cobras") are pretty good at it. However, their venom is only a hazard to the eye, unless it somehow ...


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Pyrophric chemical glands Some chemicals (such as some phosphorus compounds) spontaneously combust when coming into contact with oxygen. Glands full of these chemicals in the nose, mouth or even the throat (if the dragon is especially fire-proof), would release the chemical in conjunction with heavy exhalation (exhaled breath still contains some oxygen), ...


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I’ll preface this with the fact that I’m not too sure if the chemistry for this can be easily achieved by living creatures, but giant, flying, weaponized breath lizard, so it might be within reason. Ernaline’s Quick and Dirty Guide to Monster Hunting. Choking Dragon Kingdom: Animalia Phylum: Chordata Class: Reptilia Family: Dracaena Subfamily: Dracaeno Genus:...


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oh! ive worked on dragons before. the simplest realistic option ive found is reacting hydrogen and oxygen in the nostrils. the dragon drinks water, some of it gets sorted to a separate organ which combines CO2 and the water with photosynthetic bacteria, whom are sustained by a slight bioluminescence to produce oxygen and sugar. excess sugar is then sent to ...


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For what it's worth, the technique behind Tae Kwon Do's strikes (which I learned as a kid) often involve quickly jutting out whatever appendage is used for striking, but stiffening said appendage at the last possible moment for added force, somewhat like the crack of a whip. Sadly, I can't seem to find a good explanation online but Makoto's animations from ...


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Butt attack Much like many martial artists will rotate their hips and torso for a more powerful attack, so will your dragon. The tail flails around as a result of that. I like John's answer (+1), but dinosaurs went that way because it wouldn't be feasible for the heavy sauropods to shake their butts in battle. But your dragon is a flying creature. All it ...


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Most of the muscle is already there. one of the reason dinosaurs evolved tail weapons so often is the muscles that move the hind leg are the same ones that swing the tail, the caudofemoralis. so the bulk of the muscle that swings your tail is there weather you want it or not. for a tail weapon you either the sauropod solution or the ankylosaur solution. ...


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The tail is an erectile organ. Humans are familiar with erectile organs. The dragons tail is such. It contains no muscle whatsoever but can be abruptly stiffened by diverting a large percentage of the dragon's cardiac output into the tail. Within the tail are actual several erectile bodies and the direction of erection can be controlled by controlling ...


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Your dragon might use something similar to the technique of Bruce Lee's popularized one inch punch The one-inch punch is a skill which uses fa jin (translated as explosive power) to generate tremendous amounts of impact force at extremely close distances. This "burst" effect had been common in Neijia (internal martial art) forms. When performing ...


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make it go to its hind legs, here, you start flapping a bit, then you get a bit of a jump, synchronized with the flapping, and if you get enough thrust, you could get of the ground, but what you really want is this, a launch that uses all 4 legs foreward, and the wings to get a bit of upthrust here, otherwise, running, to flight is not very good, but it is ...


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Running jump I would have posted this sooner, but I was mesmerized by my source material. In the linked gif, notice the Malinois' form: after a running start it plants its front paws, plants its back paws immediately behind its front paws, then leaps again off its back paws. Though I wouldn't want it to jump off my back, the same principal could work for a ...


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Flip them Over. It is well known that ants bounce but elephants go splat. When fighting large animals Judo is more effective than Karate. When fighting a bear you should, rather than batter it to death, try and flip it over so it falls and gets injured. True, you don't want to use the delicate wing surfaces to fight. But you do want to use the massive ...


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"A spot. Where it's voonerable. My grandad used to tell me stories. Hit a dragon in its voonerables, he said, and you've killed it." - Guards Guards, Terry Pratchett Dragon martial arts are for fighting other dragons. A dragon against a bear is closer to hunting. The dragon is going to strike from above and behind, any time the bear puts its head ...


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I'm no expert in martial arts, but I think you're starting with a faulty assumption about how your dragons would fight. 25% of the dragon's mass is in the muscles driving the wings, you stated: for a flying creature, that's a reasonable or even necessary figure. Some quick Googling tells me that arms make up about 5-6% of a human's body mass, and obviously ...


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Armed to the Teeth: Seriously? These things have claws, many are shown with a wing claw, they have fangs, and let's not forget the classical barbed tail (possibly poisonous). A completely untrained dragon could overwhelm a ninja master through sheer VOLUME of attacks. A lot of what I am presenting here is based on an article in Dragon Magazine #134 or from ...


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Side note: "Martial arts" may be the wrong term here; maybe "fighting style." Martial arts are how humans try to make bodies that are built for armed tool using combat work in unarmed combat. Dragons are built for "unarmed" combat: claws, teeth, wings, tail... Perhaps we can draw inspiration from how other animals fight. ...


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I don't really know martial arts, but since sheer power isn't an option, dragon martial arts would therefore be about precision. Stab someone in the right spot, and they're dead. Strength has very little to do with it. Sure, air blubbers resist tearing, and I'm sure these dragons have tough scaly hide, but if that were the case, these dragons would likely ...


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