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1

You said "tunnel." You didn't say "melt a huge glob of ice that leaves the empty space desired." Different tactics are required. The critter won't be melting entire tunnels. It will be using something-or-other to cut blocks that it is then able to push out of the tunnel. It is evolving an ice knife, not a subway-tunnel-digger. It's a snow knife such as used ...


0

It’s an alien from a planet where all the vertebrate-equivalents have metal bones. In its particular case, it has an organ with a coiled metal bones that can function as a microwave antenna, connected to electocytes that pulse at microwave frequencies. The microwaves that this organ generates are then focused by a metal “bone” dish and projected through a ...


5

I agree with all the observations that such an organ would be as unlikely to evolve as Douglas Adam’s Babel Fish. But, if it did it would more than likely have these properties A primary dimension — longest — an integer multiple of 6.25 cm. This would allow the cavity to resonate at the same frequency as a microwave oven ~2.3 GHz — the resonant frequency ...


7

TL;DR: generation of high power microwaves from organic mechanisms is very, very hard and evolutionarily unlikely. Microwaves are also a terrible way of tunnelling through ice. Note that polar bears and leopard seals don't bother in the real world; who are you to argue with those highly effective apex predators? As another answer already touches on the ...


8

While it's imaginable that an organ could evolve to emit low-powered microwaves, this is not a practical way of tunnelling through ice. Melting ice - changing it from solid to liquid without substantially altering its temperature - takes a lot of energy. According to Wikipedia, enough energy to raise the temperature of an equal mass of water by 80°C. You ...


3

A venom is a nonliving toxin produced by an organism for use as a poison. Foxes do not have that. But a fox can definitely poison a thing with its bite. Foxes can transmit rabies. If you want to wipe out a carnivore species rabies works great. African wild dogs have been driven to near extinction by rabies. They are social and so it is easy for a dog to ...


9

There are a few mammals alive today with venemous saliva. The solenodon is similar to a large shrew, and has grooves on specialized teeth that conduct the saliva into a bite. Apparently this produces anti-social behavior in the solenodon, such that if they are housed together there is a tendency for them to bite each other. It is not too much of a stretch ...


23

Solenoglyphy is not the only envenomation mechanism that snakes can use there are also opisthoglyphous and proteroglyphous snakes, I would suggest that either of these mechanisms would be more suitable for a fox that has to tear and crew its meat. In particular opisthoglyphous teeth are almost unaltered in their morphology except for surface groves that ...


5

I would imagine dragons would generate a powerful amount of force with their wings in order to fly. That suggests they can make air move fast. They say that news anchors are stupid for standing outside in 80 MPH winds during hurricanes because the danger is not the 80 MPH winds but what the wind is blowing is the danger. So same for dragons, by kicking ...


2

if dragons are the same size as horses, they can kick with their back legs and claw with their front legs, or rear up on their hind legs and hit with their front legs like horses or bears do. Even elephants can rear up on their hind legs, so any smaller four-legged animal should be able to to it, freeing their front legs to attack. https://www.google.com/...


2

Instant dust storm. instant sand storm. Or, in the right place, instant storm of sharp gravel being propelled at the opposition with something like the force of a jet engine (it takes a lot of thrust to get a dragon off the ground). A smarter or more skillful dragon may also be able to direct wingtip-generated vortices at will. Think micro tornado ...


5

Wings are strongk just fine as a bludgeon Remember the wing bones in flight have to withstand several times the force of the full weight of the animal. A wing can deliver a powerful blow, that is why a swan can break a humans bones with their wing. To a creature much smaller than the dragon it would be devastating, like being hit by a baseball bat swung by ...


6

A few ways: Sharp tips Okay, this one isn't the best, but in most books/movies there are humans (what do you think). Humans are puny. Puny humans have no strong scales. Puny humans have puny skin. Puny skin is weak. Sharp-tipped wings cut puny skin. Puny humans dead. Sharp wing edges Puny humans have puny skin and puny bones. Strong wings open quickly. ...


0

Maybe a competitive advantage could be gained on the swimmers in the lanes immediately to the right and left of the subject. Say if they ate nothing but White Castle with double onions for 3 days prior to the event, when those swimmers to the immediate right and left turn their heads for a quick gulp of air...if all they get is a gulp of White Castle exhaust....


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