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I think the idea that you will have carbohydrates and something else is a mistake. When you mix oxygen, hydrogen, and ignition: The oxygen causes the hydrogen to oxidize. The hydrogen causes the oxygen to reduce. So when your atmosphere is hydrogen based, the energy storage medium might be something that can be reduced. Perhaps something rich in carbon ...


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There probably is a better way to do this, but the most achievable solution would be to have an overdeveloped circulatory system and stick some turbines in there to generate power. maybe you could also stick some rotors in the trachea and the lungs or something. this doesn't seem very efficient although it would be a lot easier to do than any kind of ...


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Define ‘android’. If you mean a machine made to look humanoid then covered in synthetic flesh: there are other answers to cover that. However: if you mean programmable humanoid robot: Why not use humans? Projects already exist to control the motor functions of simple insects. Moths, flies and cockroaches have all been controlled by adding machines to ...


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Can a biological system be used to power an android? "it needs to eat and drink like a normal person" // "The technological level is space-age" Yes, this can be done And it doesn't need to be 'space age tech' either. I can see ways of doing this with existing technology. In fact by now I think it's probably already been done in a crude way with ...


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Currently, No. Cells are, by their very nature, designed to not produce much more energy than they need. The extra energy that they do produce is what we call "body heat." If cells did produce excess energy they would broil in their own heat. While there are ways to get around this, we currently do not have the technology to do so. All that being said, you ...


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Your 30 minutes of underwater activity limit is tough, but it is eminently achievable... as you've noted, whales can already manage dives far in excess of that. Even looking at something a bit more human in scale, such as the habour seal, you can see that they're capable of diving for 30 minutes. For instance, the upper body could be filled by a massive ...


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Your organism could do one or more of the things computer scientists do when they want to ensure data doesn't get corrupted. First, include a checksum in your DNA. Checksums involve adding up all the individual bits of a piece of data and comparing the result to what it should be. If the two numbers aren't the same, you know either the checksum has been ...


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Radiation and Life Don't Mix Essentially, when you get down to it, radioactive matter is just unstable matter which makes the matter around it unstable. It's like trying to build a large and complex tower of blocks, except some blocks are radioactive and thus will randomly explode. Radiation attack molecular life at the atomic level, and there's not really ...


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DNA Horcrux In the Harry Potter books, Lord Voldemort stored his soul in a horcrux, making him unkillable. The horcrux(es) were kept safely off site. A radiation impervious organism could keep its DNA outside of its body, in a safe place. Strong enough radiation will kill via thermal energy denaturing proteins: this is "cooking". But lesser doses of ...


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Strong Cytoskeleton If your slimes are single cells, you're going to run into some huge problems. Cells are filled with a fluid called cytoplasm, which is contained within the cellular membrane. In essence, cells are like little water-filled bags. If your slime is only one cell, it can't be very slimy, because you don't want that bag to burst and leak the ...


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Starting with this definition of viscosity — a quantity expressing the magnitude of internal friction, as measured by the force per unit area resisting a flow in which parallel layers unit distance apart have unit speed relative to one another. I think that physics of friction — causation not results — is not well understood. But one theory of a cause of ...


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