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2

Bats already do this. Active Soaring Wings - Molossidae (free-tailed bats) are the prime example of this, they have very long, narrow wings and spend a lot of their time above the canopy or in open airspace looking for insects. Hovering Wings - Bats in general seem to hover a lot easier than birds (except hummingbirds). However, some nectar feeding bats ...


1

Antarctic penguins rely on available fish in the sea, and relatively undisturbed and predator-free land areas. Their key survival trait is that they are able to live in areas which most other animals find uninhabitable. They have very few defence mechanisms other than simple avoidance. As long as there are plentiful fish stocks they should be able to ...


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The great auk used to live in the Arctic but was driven to extinction by humans. https://johnjames.audubon.org/extinction-great-auk They are not technically penguins, but very similar in appearance and characteristics. You could introduce these to the Not-Arctic, or just introduce normal penguins and make the claim that if the great auk could survive ...


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It's noted in this paper that birds have evolved brains that have a significantly higher density of neurons than mammals, and it's also said the neurons are smaller, which along with less volume of cerebrospinal fluid for a given number of neurons would mean more neurons per unit of brain mass. With their higher neuronal densities (Fig. 3 A–C), songbird ...


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We don't know what is necessary for human level intelligence, so let's take the human brain as a staryting point, and look at three characteristics: weight: our brains weigh about 1.5 kg. As noted by @Slarty, some humans show intelligence with almost half their brain removed, so there's probably some room to maneuver. calories: our brains require at least ...


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A human level of capabilities can be maintained with a significantly smaller brain as can be seen from the many cases of people with a range of abnormal brains leading normal or near normal lives. So given a very large bird body it is conceivable that a large enough brain could be fitted into the skull to enable quite advanced cognitive functions. How that ...


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