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The sun will be at least as luminous as the rest of the sky Light is not scattered away. It is just scattered. Some of it will be scattered forward: this is why the sun won't ever be darker than the rest of the sky -- the luminosity of the sky lit by scattered light is the minimum. And it is not hard to prove this experimentally. Think of a cloudy day; all ...


6

You have a fundamental misunderstanding of light, color, and visibility (which is probably driving the downvotes). From Wikipedia: In the visible spectrum, black is the absorption of all colors. Black can be defined as the visual impression experienced when no visible light reaches the eye. According to Google, light is: the natural agent that ...


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FOG1 Should FOG1 look like Venus, it is because it will in some aspects be similar to it and because this is an image of Venus. :) FOG1 is a predomenetly metallic (read 90%+) super-earth orbiting a long lived, dim K-Type star. Its planetary attributes are: $$M = 7,5 Me$$ $$R = 1,3871 Re$$ $$gravity = 3,898 G (38,228 m/s^2)$$ $$Vescape = 26 km/s$$ Its ...


4

I am interpreting OP's question as "What conditions would allow for all visible light to be scattered away, making the sun look black?". Let's get cracking with some hard-science. Disclaimer : I am not going into the why of the phenomena at all, just throwing together equations. Please research on your own. Given the fact that the scattering cross-section ...


3

Fluorspar encased in graphite into lava might work under just the right circumstances. Carbon fluorides form when carbon is exposed to fluorine gas at around 450 C. The problem is that this is more or less pure carbon and and pure fluorine gas. Carbon is very stable, even though fluorine isn't, which is why the high temperature is needed. There are two ...


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Short answer: no, it cannot happen. Long answer: What is scattering? Atoms or molecules which are exposed to light absorb light energy and re-emit light in different directions with different intensity. This phenomenon of light is called scattering of light. Scattering is a general physical process where some forms of radiation, such as light, sound, or ...


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Offering the trivial solution: in any environment with no atmosphere, you will get a black sunset. With no atmosphere to scatter, you get a black sky all the time. Other than that, as others have pointed out, it can't happen. There's a logical reason for this. Consider that light is a spectrum. If you can see the sun at all, then that light is not being ...


2

Hydrogen will burn at only 4% concentration, but you will need 18-60% concentration for an explosion. However, you will not reach this limit unless your creatures are in an enclosed space. Hydrogen is much lighter than air and will simply float away before you get to this level. With storms raging, the excess hydrogen may increase the flammability of ...


1

Yes! ...Definitely not on Earth though. As stated in previous answers, the light from a setting sun has to pass through a lot more atmosphere to reach your eyes than that from a midday sun, so shorter wavelengths are more likely to be scattered before they reach you due to Rayleigh scattering. This is why a setting sun is red. So what happens if we further ...


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Frame Challenge As pointed out in the comments, free oxygen or free hydrogen cannot stably exist in an atmosphere dominated by the other gas. Something less reactive, however, has possibilities. Enter methane. The Fire Swamps Due to distance from the solar system's primary star and a thick, water-rich atmosphere, temperatures on Flareworld are ...


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