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29 votes
Accepted

Why wouldn't the world have advanced warning of a significant asteroid/comet strike?

The near-Earth objects we look for are mostly in the plane of the ecliptic, because that is where the vast majority of solar system material not in the Sun is to be found. The object that is about to ...
SoronelHaetir's user avatar
21 votes

Why wouldn't the world have advanced warning of a significant asteroid/comet strike?

So a counterpoint to your view. The world thinks there is no warning system, not because it doesn't exist, but because the world has no way to respond to this information. A world ending meteorite ...
Flotolk's user avatar
  • 520
18 votes

Why wouldn't the world have advanced warning of a significant asteroid/comet strike?

The Asteroid was caused by the collision of 2 other asteroids that were not anticipated to hit earth So, there are two asteroids flying on a merry orbit, close-ish (in astronomical terms) to earth - ...
TheDemonLord's user avatar
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15 votes

Why wouldn't the world have advanced warning of a significant asteroid/comet strike?

It could be an extra-solar object like 'Oumuamua. That would explain why it hadn't previously been detected. A sky survey might pick it up, but since it's heading almost directly towards us on a ...
N. Virgo's user avatar
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9 votes

Can I spin 3753 Cruithne and keep it spinning?

Having Earth like gravity inside the tunnel means that also the asteroid is experiencing a centrifugal force equivalent to that intensity. Whether the asteroid is able to withstand it, it depends on ...
L.Dutch's user avatar
  • 291k
9 votes

Why wouldn't the world have advanced warning of a significant asteroid/comet strike?

Really bad luck Estimates show that an asteroid in excess of 1 kilometer in diameter impacting Earth would be a civilization-kill event. While we have found over 90% of near earth 1-kilometer ...
Bubbles's user avatar
  • 1,445
7 votes

Why wouldn't the world have advanced warning of a significant asteroid/comet strike?

Maybe it doesn't orbit; it's an interstellar object that strikes the Earth on the way through. We had our first recorded passage through the solar system of an interstellar object recently: https://en....
Robertiton's user avatar
5 votes
Accepted

Rate at which jackhammer excavates asteroid

This doesn't work well at all. I've used jack hammers before. They depend on force, either the force of gravity when hammering something near your feet or the force of your body when using smaller ...
JBH's user avatar
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4 votes

Is it possible to use the tech behind Project Daedalus as an asteroid defense system?

How does the Daedalus Project move the planet-killing asteroids? Plural? I think it is possible, but there are better ways of doing this... A small deflection has a much greater effect the further out ...
Richard Kirk's user avatar
  • 9,834
4 votes

Can I spin 3753 Cruithne and keep it spinning?

Working on the assumption the asteroid is solid enough to withstand the spin, or you provide some way to strengthen or fix the rock, you could spin it up using various propulsion units. Perhaps the ...
Rory Alsop's user avatar
  • 1,518
3 votes

Why wouldn't the world have advanced warning of a significant asteroid/comet strike?

This might seem simple, but it does explain the "Why did we not notice this ?" The asteroid is moving significantly faster than usual. (Maybe it's naturally accelerated, maybe it isn't, ...
Or4ng3h4t's user avatar
  • 470
2 votes

Rate at which jackhammer excavates asteroid

TL,DR: Probably not very fast, cheaply, safely or reliably. Ducted fans don't typically provide a lot of thrust, unless they consume an awful lot of power. This ducted fan produces 20-25 kg of thrust,...
Monty Wild's user avatar
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2 votes
Accepted

Asteroid--earth as a bull's eye

Maybe, too much depends on the asteroid's actual size Okay let's do some maths. First, if an asteroid on collision course is detected 4 weeks prior, you can only hit it with Earth-located missiles (...
Vesper's user avatar
  • 8,082
2 votes

Why wouldn't the world have advanced warning of a significant asteroid/comet strike?

We Were Getting Our Rocks Off In a near future where humanity is experimenting with moving meteor fragments or high albedo debris around via drone "tugboats", we may end up cluttering up the ...
nullpointer's user avatar
  • 8,709
1 vote

Why wouldn't the world have advanced warning of a significant asteroid/comet strike?

The object had a near-miss with the moon, and was pulled on to either a very different trajectory, or had been predicted to hit the moon, and didn't, again ending up on an Earth-intercepting ...
MikeB's user avatar
  • 141
1 vote

Why wouldn't the world have advanced warning of a significant asteroid/comet strike?

Simple: You're looking for a needle in a haystack. How much stuff is in the sky in your solar system? Few objects? Easy to track and spot... Many? harder to spot. Many upon many? harder and harder to ...
WernerCD's user avatar
  • 1,735
1 vote

Asteroid--earth as a bull's eye

You appear to be correct. We simply do not have the tech to deflect an asteroid of that size. While nukes are a popular option to do this, it's important to keep in mind that they only go suborbital. ...
Bubbles's user avatar
  • 1,445
1 vote

Asteroid--earth as a bull's eye

Not in 4 weeks The math is pretty simple. The Asteroid will hit in 4 weeks, 2419200 seconds. Earth has a radius of approximately 6000000 meters. We wish to move the rock by 6000000 meters over 2419200 ...
ErikHall's user avatar
  • 2,481
1 vote

Can I spin 3753 Cruithne and keep it spinning?

Honestly, it seems that the construction as described in your original post might work--but it would be very fragile against disturbances. @L.Dutch is right about the centrifugal force. Your design ...
Bill Blondeau's user avatar
1 vote

Can I spin 3753 Cruithne and keep it spinning?

The shape of the asteroid would be important to whether or not you can spin it with easily predictable path. One reason earth can spin easily predictable have to do with its shape and the source of ...
AkiZukiLenn's user avatar

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