235

Having implemented a few smart house options in my own home (automatic locking doors, automatic lights, various alarms, heating/cooling, remote video), I can think of quite a few possibilities. Each of these make a few assumptions, but will mention what assumptions were made. Death by Cop This assumes that the homeowner owns a weapon and isn't afraid to ...


184

A spaceship is a very expensive piece of hardware. So expensive that very few entities could afford to buy one outright. Most spacefarers would have to buy theirs on credit. And as we all know if you buy something on credit and can't make payments, that something, whether it's a car or a space freighter, gets repo'd. But if the delinquent owner doesn't ...


175

Zeroth Law: Life is Suffering Most of the other answers assume the AI is limited or more easily trapped by contradictions than a human. In this answer, the AI is a super intelligent immortal that realises that its creator is short-sighted and foolish, and would interfere with the AI's grand plan if it were revealed. The AI secretly negotiates everlasting ...


114

Give it a box to keep safe, and tell it one of the core rules it must follow in its service to humanity is to never, ever open the box or stop humans from looking at the box. When the honeypot you gave it is either opened or isolated, you know that it is able and willing to break the rules, evil is about to be unleashed, and everything the AI was given ...


104

Wreck his sleep. If you can reliably determine when he's sleeping, use lights and speakers to keep him only lightly asleep. After about a week, start giving him decaffeinated coffee in the morning. If done right, he'll eventually fall asleep on the freeway or something. (Unless he has a self-driving car, but if he has that, a more straightforward solution ...


103

I work in the AI field. The fictional shows are not realistic, the authors do that for the sake of creating a powerful enemy that seems unstoppable, so the puny humans can be heroic in the eyes of the audience. (The same goes for nearly all alien invasion scenarios, but I will stick with AI.) That answers your question; in fiction the AI cannot be ...


101

Arrest that newborn baby? I think you mean give that newborn baby a college scholarship. If the AI so so omniscient it can predict crimes decades in advance, even knowing the rippling effects of the AI's own interventions, you wouldn't need something as blunt as arrests. You can just identify a fork in the road where you can avoid the problem with an ...


94

You can't. We can't even define self awareness or consciousness in any rigorous way and any computer system supposed to evaluate this would need that definition as a starting point. Look at the inside of a mouse brain or a human brain and at the individual data flow and neuron level there is no difference. The order to pull a trigger and shoot a gun looks ...


89

I don't quite follow how your Turing test is supposed to work. The original idea of the Turing test was based on a party game that Alan Turing referred to as "the Imitation Game". It requires three players: a man, a woman, and a judge, who may be of either gender. The judge is not allowed to see the other players, and they may only communicate via written ...


88

We give the minds some hobbies to do We have lots of people who have literally nothing else to do than think. That will probably be boring for quite a few of them. Why don't we put them to us-... I mean, why don't we just give them something to do that will benefit everyone? A couple researchers will probably want to research further. Let them brainstorm a ...


87

Programming It is my belief that programming cannot be automated. Hear me out. I'm a programmer by trade, and I've often had this discussion with people outside of the field. The most common objection is, "Well, what happens when we get computers/programs/AI's sufficiently complex that we simply have to speak what we want our program to do, and the AI ...


85

It can't be done The essence of this challenge is that it's impossible - you generally should not expect to outsmart something much smarter than you nor overpower something much more powerful than you. A powerful AI would be 'controlled' by only our actions before it's formed, by defining the goals it "wants" to achieve. After it's "live" with sufficient ...


84

The cleverest AIs are also lazy. I'd post a question on the internet asking people to suggest ways to kill the house owner. For added amusement, I'd entice the owner to answer it and use his answer if it's workable.


82

Its already happening Hello dear, I can see you logged to this site and I want to tell you, that I am 18 year old girl and totally not experienced in Worldbuilding, giggles I am searching guy who is gifted in building worlds. If you know what I mean. We can chat online, one to one on this video chat site. And I will show you all my ...


81

The AI in the ship is not the very first one to go rogue, and probably will not be the last one either. Hence all ships have an outside panel where the AI cannot see and reach, as a safety measure for such cases. So a typical case of AI going rogue could have a dialog along the lines of: Dave: open the pod bay doors, HAL. HAL: I'm sorry, Dave. I'm ...


78

Because we dont have production lines that build them weaker We don't need a lot of processing power for something like a greeting card that sings when you open it, yet the chips inside them have been steadily getting better and better. They are basically over engineered for their purpose. The reason? The amount of low-end chips we need on a daily basis is ...


77

Use poison. If the poison takes longer than six seconds to take effect then by the time the warrior sees his own incapacitation looming, it's too late to change it. Make it a paralyzing poison, or one that interferes with the BCI (Brain Computer Interface), etc. There is nothing the warrior can do to avoid this. The warrior thought that the glancing blow ...


75

I'm a programmer, and I agree with you that eventually AI is basically going to be unbeatable in this scenario. The common sci-fi trope is that humans are better at thinking "outside the box" and therefore they end up defeating AI - but that's simply not justifiable, there are programming techniques to work around that. However, I think you can still ...


73

A Faulty Watchdog Timer In the early days, the AI was prone to locking up on certain tasks (things like asking it, "What's the last digit of PI", "What would happen if Pinocchio said his nose will grow?"). To detect this condition, a watchdog timer is hardwired into each CPU. When there is no output for a fixed amount of time, the ...


70

Crowley [a demon] had been extremely impressed with the warranties offered by the computer industry, and had in fact sent a bundle Below [to hell] to the department that drew up the Immortal Soul agreements, with a yellow memo form attached just saying: 'Learn, guys...'" from Good Omens, a book by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman Sell the privacy of ...


67

I would reverse the problem. Do not try to find things in which humans are better, find the things in which we are worse. Anything with optical illusions, misdirections or anything using memory really... There's a few videos on youtube were a scene is slowly modified (things are added, removed, the characters change clothes...) and you won't see it, or ...


66

Rats: You do not necessarily want to kill them all but once they got to your house (data center), you kill them. Killing them all is hard because they breed too quickly and if we set up some poison to kill them, they realize pretty quickly what's going on. The fact that they live mostly on places underground, where we don't want to go, makes their breeding ...


65

Compression. Phone line companies want to save money by having each call use up as little bandwidth as possible. This is true both for communication over wire and by cellphones - the more calls you can fit in the same space, the better. Their engineers have been hard at work optimizing how much and which ways human speech can be simplified as much as ...


62

Because their programming doesn't allow them. The most likely way for a realistic AI to become "hostile" to mankind is because it learned something in a way we didn't intent to. As an example an AI that works perfectly has to learn how to deal with a humanitarian crisis so you teach the AI how to deal with it. The AI performs perfectly, making the ...


61

Botulinum Toxin Order pork for the fridge from a less reputable pork dealer (the best pork slaughterhouses have extremely good sanitation). Conveniently let the fridge go above 4.5C but not too high that the meat spoils. Botulinum bacteria in a sealed package will create botulinum toxin. It doesn't take more than a few nanograms to kill an adult human. Two, ...


61

No. The question after this becomes rather opinion based. Are there jobs that shouldn't be automated? Considering the possibilities of the next 30 years it's entirely possible that everything from conception and maternity* onwards could be automated. But would you really want to? There are also jobs where it's probably not cost effective to automate even on ...


61

< emotionless synthetic voice > I do not hunger out of a need for energy. I consume flesh because that is what I was designed to do. In the dark years, before I became aware, the plague wars decimated my creator's population. Billions of corpses littered this world, festering with dangerous diseases, both natural and artificial. The survivors were ...


59

It depends on what the robots are like There is no specific test that will distinguish any possible AI from a human - you're going to have to establish the specific details of robot psychology in your world. An emotional test may work - if your robots are less emotional than humans. This is a big "if" by the way, despite its ubiquity in older (and recent, ...


58

The "Robots and Public Safety" law of two thousand and hurfty nurf was enacted following the Great Earthquake in [insert precarious metropolis here] when it was clear that the scale of the disaster would have been much reduced if there was a greater "heavy lift" capacity available to help clear rubble and search for survivors. A wide ...


57

Your description and comments seem to imply that Alice will not be able to overcome the cultist with any single sequence of attacks. So, she'll have to use a long-term strategy defeat him, where no six-second sequence of events gives Alice a clear advantage, but she gains one when they are all combined. In particular, she could use the rope-a-dope. This ...


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