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A sphere is, among all the solids, the shape that minimizes the ratio between surface and volume. Since heat is dissipated through the surface, it makes the house more energy efficient, which in mountain region is surely a benefit. Which is why also animals living in cold regions tend to be more rounded, to waste as little body heat as possible. Just to give ...


19

Access to a building material which makes spherical constructions easier than angled ones. Like a tree which tends to grow curved trunks. Or very large animals with curved bones (although large land animals are uncommon in mountain regions - they are usually much better adapted to plains). Or shrubs with long and thin but flexible branches. They lack the ...


16

The design of the arena reflects the use! Amphitheater What we call Colosseum today was once the Flavian Amphitheatre. The ruins we know today reflect in some art the original, but had been used as a quarry and stripped of most decoration. Researchers estimate between 50 and 80 thousand visitors, depending on one crucial fact: Do we count the additional ...


16

Round, almost hemispherical houses have been popular for thousands of years in dangerous climates like Skara Brae in the Orkney Islands. No reason why the same arguments for comfort (minimum surface area for warmth) and low wind resistance wouldn't apply in mountainous regions just as much as in windswept sub-arctic islands. It's a reasonable question for ...


10

Balloons. Balloons are round. Whatever they use to make their houses, they have to blow them up like a balloon. Maybe stiched animal hides? Something like paper mache built up over a bladder structure? Maybe a mixture of bird feathers, straw, fluff, and tar, like birds make their nests out of, but with a roof - like a wrens' nest.


8

Although the knowledge is lost in the mists of time, the mountain is really a volcano. After being nearly wiped out, ancestors built spherical houses so that they could quickly escape an eruption by simply rolling down the slopes. The volcano hasn't erupted for a thousand years and the inhabitants have forgotten why they build in this way but it is their ...


6

Snow. Sometimes they get extreme snow fall, a near-sphere is the best shape to resist this load.


4

Circular cultures There have been plenty of "circular" cultures in history. It seems not too many steps from there to spherical houses, which I'm pretty sure have existed as well. The circular or spherical shape can help deflect water, snow and mud streams that they might get in contact with, so the house can take much more pressure from nature. ...


4

Hazardous gas and liquid mitigation - and structural integrity. These underground settlements are full of nasty surprises, pockets of hydrogen gas, pockets of methane, pockets of propane from unattended stoves (you didn't say what year this was set. Bottled LPG is frequently used as a heat and cooking source), pockets of water, pockets of carbon dioxide, all ...


3

Move spectators onto the field. Viewers will be moved out onto the playing field! It is a degree of intimacy never before attempted in the history of sport! If plexiglas domes are not within the abilities of your people they could have some robust posts acting as a buffer, or they could simply sit at their tables cheering and reaching out to intimately ...


3

Their buildings would float, simple as that: Vast mats of linked pontoons would rise and fall with the waves; walls and roofs would flex to conform to the expansion and contraction of the undulation of the flooring substrate, perhaps little more than canvas-like fabric drapped from ropes strung between poles. Nets would hang in strategic places to catch ...


2

Because this is a desert and you need cooling Higher ceilings in a building give a very useful passive cooling effect. A couple of years ago, I went on holiday to Gambia, staying at an eco-lodge. The lodge owner had built round mud-brick houses with high round roofs. In spite of the high daytime temperatures outside, the temperature inside was always ...


2

Orthogonic (right angles) architecture has not been the norm for most of human existence. It became predominant with the invasions and spread of imperial building technologies, which then violently eradicated the indigenous vernacular architectures. The reason that round and curved types of organic dwellings seem to be common in highland mountain areas is ...


2

Not a Sphere but close This is one building from the TV series "Raised by Wolves" The design can be made from uncut stacked stone and doesn't require timber beams of which could be hard to get in a mountainous region while stone is plentiful. It doesn't require timber and doesn't require mortar, just plenty of rock. Here's the ones from Star Wars ...


1

Transportation A spherical house is easier to move than a square one. Assuming smallish houses made of light materials, you could just roll them to some other place. One reason would be winter migration. There could also be reasons to move house constantly: high winds, rock/mudslides or other dangerous natural phenomena. It could also simply be a building ...


1

Because they build with giant bladders and concrete. You need a source of pressurized air and a bunch of water. Ideally, you also have some sort of shellac. The mountains probably have a large chasm that has a strong, regular wind. It probably also has natural spring very high up. For the cement, it benefits from having lime and volcanic ash, but there are ...


1

I submit for your consideration, ancient mapmaking and land navigation. If you have a visually distinctive landmark of a known fixed width, you can cut notches into a stick and hold it at the correct length, and get a surprisingly good idea of your range to a target based on how wide it currently is in your field of view. If you can get ranges along two ...


1

Most of their lands were below sea level. https://www.earthmagazine.org/article/dutch-masters-netherlands-exports-flood-control-expertise The Lemurians put the Dutch to shame as regards claiming lands out of the sea. Earthworks, dikes and other flood control measures characterized their tech. Even the land which had been dry to begin with was only a ...


1

To begin, a few assumptions. By 'mile wide', I am assuming you mean a mile deep, or thick, from top to bottom. I am also assuming that the temperature never gets more than a few degrees above freezing, so no 'snow melt' days. The existinng snow is relatively permanent. You do not clarify, but it is perhaps evident that there is an atmosphere around the ...


1

They will need a lot of solid ground to grow food, unless they live entirely off of fish. Even if they live entirely off of fish they probably still need a lot of land to grow other things such as trees for wood, and plants for fodder, wood, medicine and much more (glues, perfumes, cleaners, soaps, resins etc). If they had some large but still limited area ...


1

Let's take a step back before answering your question. Ice is a poor foundation material for building permanent structures on it. Since it tends to creep under load, anything you build on it will sooner or later be deformed and destroyed due to differential displacement. Therefore you won't build anything bigger or more durable than an igloo or a tent on it. ...


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