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1

You see this small albedo is most probably closly connected to high temperatures." 1100 degrees Celsius hot enough to melt gold" is a large undrestemation. It is hot enough to melt some rocks and most metals! And together with high sun radiation and magnetic fields it hot enough to form plasma. Plasma is a key here - it can both be a perfect mirror or a ...


3

If we start with a somewhat strange planet (mostly quartz, Iron, nickel and aluminum) and give it an atmosphere of almost pure carbon monoxide and dioxide. This is highly improbable to begin with but if we give it a very strong electric field and then hit with the mother of all solar flares you just might get optically aligned carbon nanotube growth as the ...


5

Dwarf elephants are still elephants. They're hella strong. They'd probably be used for the same things regular elephants were used for: Construction Warfare - not sure who's going to fight you if you have an elephant on your side, and a relatively portable one at that. Interestingly, because these elephants are relatively small, island nations in the ...


0

Riding food and labor. this could all be ways depending on what your civilization has around if there something a better alternative then the might not use the elephants but if there is not they would use the elephants for those three. War could also be used they would make a greek shock cavalry.


3

My initial guess would be that the Earth, like the Moon, would lose about 2779.84 km of its average diameter, and calculations indicate that it would then have 0.478 x its original volume. My initial guess is more like "this is really hard". In order to remove mass from a body, you need to deliver enough energy to a portion of it to allow it to achieve ...


0

According to evolution: as big as they needs to be in order to survive and reproduce On earth the size of plants and animals vary greatly. Both mice and elephants thrive in their respective environment. I don't think there is much suggesting that mice would be better off if they were bigger, nor elephants if they were smaller. Same for plants, we have small ...


1

Typically the size of an organism doesn't increase or decrease because of a planet's gravity. The reason for the dinosaurs growing to their immense size and the large bugs that predated the dinosaurs is thought to be because of a more oxygen saturated atmosphere. Today's atmosphere is about 20% Oxygen, but when terrestrial life (mostly athropods) first ...


1

No it wouldn't be possible live normally as a skeleton. Not in the quotidian reality we inhabit. The closest scientific explanation is this is the afterlife and supernatural forces are at work here. A fact confirmed by observation: a posthumous life as skeletons and all the falling through infinite space. Much science is based on observation and the ...


2

Yeah, skeletons, unless you mean something else by that word, are not going to be alive on their own. Some alternatives (aside from magic and synthetic life): They are some humanoid animal with no or little fat tissue, pale skin, no hair, and very fragile. They are no skeletons by any account (they have all their vital organs like any other animal), yet, ...


4

If it isn't, what would be the closest scientific explanation? The skeletons are artificial, and actually are complex robots which have a human conscious (somehow) transferred into it / are piloting it remotely. That's the closest plausible explanation you can really get.


3

The Lushu roams in a large heard and is predated on by a large tiger like species of animal. When a predator is seen, the Lushu stampede as a large group or several large groups. Their stripes provide a sort of dazzle camouflage a bit like that used by Zebras. With all the animals running about in all directions it would be difficult during the approach for ...


11

So I'm wondering is it possible to live as a skeleton normally? No, for a lot of reasons: bones alone won't hold together and the skeleton would crumble to pieces in the blink of an eye. Which based on your description is leads to the infinity. bones alone can't perform any metabolism: they can't exchange gases, they can't allow the flow of blood, they can'...


5

There are four possibilities I can think of: Make these plains extremely colorful, so that the lushus blend in properly. That could be a seasonal thing, if (say) the predators of these lushus migrate, and only appear in the lushus' territory during the colorful season. Make it the defensive strategy that some birds use, such that predators will tend to ...


-1

Are the markings necessarily stable? You could be looking at a creature that shifts its color and pattern as radically as an octopus does. Octopus does it both for camouflage and for language signaling to other octopi. Depending upon how intelligent you want these creatures to be, the bright colors would show well far across the plains, telling other lushu “...


1

The only problem with being an ambush hunter is air supply. So, there are a couple options. It floats on the surface, drifting as if dead, until some scavenger comes close, at which point it eats the scavenger. This allows it to just breathe at the surface. It can drop its metabolism way down temporarily, allowing it to rest on a single breath and then do ...


2

but below? That's more applicable either to gill-breathers (like sharks, eels or anglerfish) or colder-blooded air breathers (like crocodilians). Ambush would still be the better tactic. There are various marine mammals that can hold their breath for long periods of time, and if they were holding still they could last even longer. The Brethmechin in your ...


3

If you're looking for some subspecies of Felidae that might "make it", Viderridae are your best bet, as they are omnivorous to begin with. They're the least specialized family of Felidae, and the most primitive, which might not be what you're looking for in your worldbuilding. As for "the big cats", I'd say possible, but unlikely. While not exactly ...


5

Sure Say that there is an illness, that only infects the prey animals. It doesn't kill them, but it does make them skinnier, and slower to reproduce. They don't die off immediately. Instead, their numbers lessen. And they provide less meat to the big cats that hunt them. Over time, less meat will drive the hypercarnivores to eat plants to make up for ...


23

Meet the red panda, Ailurus fulgens. A red panda at the Cincinnati Zoo. Photograph by Greg Hume, available on Wikimedia under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license. The red panda lives in the eastern Himalayas and eats mostly bamboo. Red pandas belong to the family Ailuridae, in the superfamily Musteloidea, making them close ...


3

The mountains become lighter, and float higher. In our world, the Appalachians formed from plate tectonics in the remote Ordovician. But much later, in the Cretaceous, they rose again. Plate tectonics were not responsible for this late rise. Instead, the mountains rose because they became lighter. Appalachians Get a Face-Lift From Earth's Mantle The ...


2

Shrinking due to cooling. As the deeper layers of a planet cool down, the planet shrinks. Of course this will result in stresses on the surface, which has to adapt to a lower volume. This will produce wrinkles on that very surface, and those wrinkles are the renewed mountains you talk about.


0

It is entirely plausible that they would become extinct - either that or be replaced or restricted. Australia has a unique ecosystem due to several factors: Isolation, with limited historical interaction with other continents Relatively uniform climatic zones Relatively uniform flora types, due to relatively consistent soil types No large natural barriers ...


1

They survive... in a way. Technically the marsupials living back then in the middle Eocene are all dead. Deader than a door nail, deader than a dead parrot used in a Monty Python skit. So no they didn't survive. They did however have descendants. Of which we do call some of them Microbiotherians. The others we call Eometatheria. The distinction is ...


2

This is probably a very lackluster answer, but I don't see why they couldn't survive. Marsupials are after all Mammals and mammals can be pretty well adapted to living in colder climates unlike their reptilian partners. The key point will be a viable food source. Almost all life in Cold areas rely on the sea as a source of food. Polar bears hunt seals and ...


2

Microbiotherians will not go extinct: they live in South America, not Australia or Antarctica. Must be careful with these questions. From OP- here is what I am answering: Would the ancient microbiotherians survive this transition, or would the dropping temperatures drive them into extinction? I read about microbiotherians, which are not extinct. ...


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