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I would say the land needed would depend on what materials you are planning on giving them access to. As earlier answers have stated, if they will also be growing things like hemp they will need more land. I can answer with certainty though, that a monoculture would be an extremely poor choice for the person in this scenario. Planting the same crops ...


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It depends. You would have the fields in the valleys, not directly on the mountain sides. In the southern parts of the mountains you could grow more crops than in the northern parts. The part of the mountains where it rains a lot are worse than the sunny parts. I found a nice article about farming in the Alps in German here: https://www.planet-wissen.de/...


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Mind you, there's a key element beyond elevation, and that's location. Agriculture in Tibet and on the Altiplano is possible because they're close to the equator. Whereas in New England (where I'm from), treeline in the White Mountains goes under 4000 feet in areas. The alpine tundra's notoriously fragile -- footsteps can disrupt vegetation for many years -...


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The Incas grew many varieties of potatoes on the Andes mountains of what is now Peru. They also grew quinoa, squash, beans, and a species of corn that is different from the modern. I would expect also that any spring crop like spinach, beets, and peas would do well in a cool environment. They used terraced gardens to compensate for the lack of flat arable ...


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Qingke The best analogue of your nation is actually Tibet. The Tibetan plateau sits some 4.5kms above sea level, and they have crops up there which look reasonably similar to those in lower altitudes, but with some differences. The most common crop in Tibet is something called qingke, which is a form of barley that grows particularly well in high altitudes ...


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