Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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Yes Fences can keep out megafauna but the key to doing it successfully is plenty of space and not many humans. If you look at Africa, farmers use beehives and thorn bushes to protect crops from elephants See Comparing the effectiveness of beehive fences to thorn barriers in farm invasions and exits by elephants The real problem is too many people ...


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i think there're 2 directions to approach this question: biology and culinary use. 1st, biology. Warm climate with reasonable humidity (like rainforest or Mediterranean shrub) tends to have higher biodiversity than cold climate, since plants (which form the base of the foodchain) can grow all year long.. also, the rate of evolution seems to be higher there (...


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Any substance that a plant produces, if not directly involved with reproduction or energy storage, is only justifiable as a defense mechanism. I.e. Laurel leaves have an antibiotic effect which some birds use to keep their nest sanitized, by adding them to the thread. Aroma rich plants are not exclusive of Mediterranean climates, vanilla, cocoa and coffee ...


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I think that you shouldn't think of spice VS no spice, but as in diversity of spices VS just using one or two. One reason why the Mediterranean has more spices may simply be because it's on the coast - therefore it sees more migration and commerce than a continental region. You'd have a boat sailing from Egypt that could carry a few seeds to Spain, Italy, ...


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Yes Agriculture is still able to be developed with the existance of megafauna. It's a matter of keeping the megafauna away from the farms that dictates the agriculture. If your people are able to set up some sort of barrier and herd the animals away, then your farms are able to grow and thrive. If this is in the agricultural revolution-era, than it will ...


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