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Imagine that there is a possibility of starting all over again, and create a new world.

At the food level what mistakes we could avoid making so there are not so many diseases? What foods should not have been "created" by humans and why?

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closed as too broad by anon, Azuaron, kingledion, sphennings, Anketam Dec 12 '17 at 21:06

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. $\endgroup$ – James Dec 16 '17 at 6:18
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Mass produced high sugar content foods
One of the biggest things that we could change for the better would be to reduce the amount of sugar that is consumed in all its forms. The modern western diet provides massive quantities of sugar on a continuous basis that we are not well adapted to deal with. The net result is weight gain, obesity, metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

Humans are best adapted to eat what our diet was for the majority of our evolutionary history. Although this diet must have varied depending on location and it is not known in detail, Some general pointers can be gained from looking at the diets of hunter gathers that survived into the twentieth century. They all eat much less sugar and carbohydrates.

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  • $\begingroup$ that's what I'm talking about, diseases that are directly linked to our diet $\endgroup$ – Somebody Dec 12 '17 at 13:46
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    $\begingroup$ There are loads of diseases linked to being obese increased risk of cancer, stroke, sleep apnea, asthma, fatty liver disease, hypertension and neurodegeneration to name some. If you are interested I recommend this video youtube.com/watch?v=qEuIlQONcHw and a very good book if "why we get fat" by Garry Taubes - it was a real eye opener for me. Taubes quotes a large number of large scale scientific trails and provides some very good arguments. Ask yourself the question why do we get fat? – Think about it. $\endgroup$ – Slarty Dec 12 '17 at 14:36
  • $\begingroup$ i will see the video and read the book, thanks. :) have you ever read something about Paleo diet? $\endgroup$ – Somebody Dec 12 '17 at 14:45
  • $\begingroup$ @Somebody I have heard about it, but I'm not that familiar with it. I suspect it's on the right track, but I would be careful about being too prescriptive about diet detail and concentrate on the most significant points. There are so many fads and myths about diet that it pays to think very critically about what is being said. As an example a lot of people still believe that the only explanation that is needed as to why we get fat is that we eat more calories than we burn off. Which is as true (and useful) as explaining why a room is crowded by saying that more people went in than came out. $\endgroup$ – Slarty Dec 12 '17 at 15:08
  • $\begingroup$ I talked about it because it ends up making sense, I'm not restricting anything, but what I read about it is not a question of calories, it's a matter of eating as natural and without additives as possible. Which makes sense, what is the use of eating light yogurt 0% fat (because it does not get fat), if that same yogurt contains triple the sugar and ingredients that can not even pronounce? In this lifestyle they eat "true" food rather than pre-made and full of bad ingredients $\endgroup$ – Somebody Dec 12 '17 at 15:15
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In dose venenum - the poison is in the dose

Having developed as species in the wild, homo sapiens has still the instinct to eat as much as available. In some places of present world this lead to excessive intake of nutrients and then to the related pathologies.

The problem is not in the foods, is in the amount some of us consume every day. Historically speaking humans died more often for lack of food than for excess of food. An hamburger or a carbonated drink once in a while is not a problem, 20 hamburgers or 3 liters of carbonated drink per day every day are a huge problem.

For your reference before stating that eating fat is bad, look at rabbit starvation

among those forest Indians who depend at times on rabbits, the leanest animal in the North, and who develop the extreme fat-hunger known as rabbit-starvation. Rabbit eaters, if they have no fat from another source—beaver, moose, fish—will develop diarrhea in about a week, with headache, lassitude and vague discomfort. If there are enough rabbits, the people eat till their stomachs are distended; but no matter how much they eat they feel unsatisfied. Some think a man will die sooner if he eats continually of fat-free meat than if he eats nothing, but this is a belief on which sufficient evidence for a decision has not been gathered in the North. Deaths from rabbit-starvation, or from the eating of other skinny meat, are rare; for everyone understands the principle, and any possible preventive steps are naturally taken

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  • $\begingroup$ it's clear that eating 20 burgers does not make much sense :) but at the nutritional level, does a burger bring some benefit to our health? or a soda? $\endgroup$ – Somebody Dec 12 '17 at 12:13
  • $\begingroup$ you are not comparing the natural fat with the industrial fat? are you? $\endgroup$ – Somebody Dec 12 '17 at 13:34
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    $\begingroup$ It might seem counter intuitive, but eating fat is not bad for you. In fact without some essential fatty acids you would die. Humans like other animals are very good at maintaining a stable weight if they eat the sorts of food they are adapted to eat. Other than animals that hibernate, you do not see grossly overweight animals in the wild even in times of plenty. $\endgroup$ – Slarty Dec 12 '17 at 13:47
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    $\begingroup$ @somebody if I take a 4oz sirloin steak, a lettuce and tomato salad, and a crusty bun, it has the exact same nutritional value as if I grind the steak into burger and make the same ingredients into a sandwich. Preparing food without changing its composition so people enjoy it does not change its nutritional value. $\endgroup$ – pojo-guy Dec 13 '17 at 2:38
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Meat

Meat raises humans an entropic layer, which is a large efficiency loss.

Animal based proteins are reasonably linked to some cancers.

Animals are a vector for some human diseases.

The main reason meat has been viable these last few million years is that the animals extract value from unvalued resources; a meadow of grass has no food value to humans, but a goat eating it does. If your planed world avoids having unvalued resources meat becomes non-competitive.

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