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I'm looking for an opinion that to us would be as low impact as preferring cake to pie, but in the future would be consequential enough to be considered "wrong think" to a dystopian government. Something worth spending resources to get rid of.

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    $\begingroup$ I wonder if asking for an opinion can be considered "opinion based"... $\endgroup$
    – L.Dutch
    Dec 11, 2017 at 13:47
  • $\begingroup$ I'm reminded of that webcomic strip where a dystopian regime takes over, but the only "wrong-think" they punish is refusing to pronounce "GIF" as "jif". $\endgroup$
    – F1Krazy
    Dec 11, 2017 at 13:52
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    $\begingroup$ This question is just too broad to answer. Just look at the vast changes in social values in the past 100 years regarding issues like sexuality, gender, race, animal welfare, religion and lots of other aspects. All these changes currently have counter-movements which might or might not be successful at reversing them. These trends are so chaotic right now, they are impossible to extrapolate. $\endgroup$
    – Philipp
    Dec 11, 2017 at 13:52
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    $\begingroup$ You could simply look at opinions which are currently considered abominable abominations to be killed with fire, but were boring platitudes, say, 100 years ago. For example, girls become marriageable at 12, boys become men at 14, vagrants should be put in workhouses, wives owe obedience to their husbands, income taxes above 5% are inconceivable, property rights are absolute, soveriegn powers have a God-given right to make war on each other, crimes of passion are excusable, adultery is a crime, the right to vote is naturally linked to property, men vote for their women, ... $\endgroup$
    – AlexP
    Dec 11, 2017 at 13:57
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    $\begingroup$ Almost any opinion is potentially "wrong think", subject to whatever defines "right think". In fact the greater and narrower the definition of "right think" is, the greater the possibility of "wrong think". Look at the dispute between the people of Lilliput and Blefescu. It just takes people to fail to recognise the trivial as trivial. $\endgroup$
    – Lee Leon
    Dec 11, 2017 at 14:21

3 Answers 3

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Tie the opinion in to some great event or movement, even in a roundabout way.

Putting gravy on chips tends to be a Northern (England) thing. Maybe the hard-line government of the day led to massive strikes in the North, and chips and gravy was an easy and simple food to get to all of the demonstrators and so became associated with the strikes. The movement was later ruthlessly crushed, but chips and gravy was always associated with the movement from then on.

Thirty years later the government has tried its hardest to remove all memory of the events, even to the level that no chip shops are allowed to serve gravy.

It's just an example of course, but it's easy to see how something innocuous can be tied up with something very serious.

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Going outdoors.

The environment matters.

Workers have rights.

Maybe people should get a say in the government?

Okay, not particularly mundane, but things we take for granted

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In the not so distant past countries have fought wars just to dispute on a conjunction: it is the notorious filioque issue between Roman Catholics and Greek Orthodox.

Whether that term Filioque is included, as well as how it is translated and understood, can have important implications for how one understands the central Christian doctrine of the Holy Trinity. For some, the term implies a serious underestimation of the Father's role in the Trinity; for others, denial of what it expresses implies a serious underestimation of the role of the Son in the Trinity. Over time, the term became a symbol of conflict between Eastern Christianity and Western Christianity, although there have been attempts at resolving the conflict. Among the early attempts at harmonization are the works of Maximus the Confessor, who notably was canonised independently by both Eastern and Western churches.

Just make a couple of religiously saturated governments in your world, and similar issue will arise again.

Or, if you want to really go mundane, you may use some other examples along the line of:

While many people consider this topic unimportant, some hold strong opinions on the matter. Advice columnist Ann Landers said that the subject was the most responded to (15,000 letters in 1986) and controversial issue in her column's history. Defenders of either position cite advantages ranging from aesthetics, hospitality, and cleanliness to paper conservation, the ease of detaching individual squares, and compatibility with setting specifics such as recreational vehicles or having pets. Some writers have proposed connections to age, sex, or political philosophy, and survey evidence has shown a correlation with socioeconomic status.

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    $\begingroup$ Whoa, the order of tea making is NOT mundane! I shall request, sir, that you retract that statement or I shall be honour-bound to demand satisfaction. $\endgroup$ Dec 11, 2017 at 13:57
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    $\begingroup$ The toilet paper thing is a typical bike shed problem. Everyone uses a roll of toilet paper several times per day, so everyone feels qualified to form and state a personal opinion on the matter. $\endgroup$
    – Philipp
    Dec 11, 2017 at 13:57
  • $\begingroup$ Milk to tea? What a revolting thought! $\endgroup$ Dec 11, 2017 at 18:26

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