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Which trees are the least vulnerable to fire? These trees will be the "restaurants" (more like small food kitchens) in this mostly realistic world. There will be vents up at the top of the trees for smoke to exhaust.

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closed as off-topic by cobaltduck, Vincent, JBH, L.Dutch, Frostfyre Dec 14 '17 at 4:27

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about worldbuilding, within the scope defined in the help center." – cobaltduck, Vincent, JBH, L.Dutch, Frostfyre
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ If you're asking about the properties of real world trees, this isn't about building a fictional world. $\endgroup$ – sphennings Dec 7 '17 at 15:43
  • $\begingroup$ @sphennings The OP specifically states that this is a 'mostly realistic world.' Sounds on topic. $\endgroup$ – kingledion Dec 7 '17 at 15:47
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    $\begingroup$ @kingledion If they're asking "What fictional tree is most resistant to fire?" we can't help them either since we don't do reviews of the media. $\endgroup$ – sphennings Dec 7 '17 at 15:48
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    $\begingroup$ Just as a note, you should not accept answers so quickly, if you leave the question open longer it might get more (and even better!) answers. $\endgroup$ – kingledion Dec 7 '17 at 16:08
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    $\begingroup$ A better question would be "What properties make trees less vulnerable to fire?" thus allowing for traits from different trees to be combined in a way not found on Earth. $\endgroup$ – rek Dec 7 '17 at 16:20
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Mediterranean Cypress

This tree, which can be up to 100 ft tall or more, has demonstrated significant fire resistance.

Ironically, it is generally considered that conifers like pine and cypress are the worst trees in fires; their fibrous bark, year long leaf litter, and oily leaves make them very flammable.

In general the deciduous trees seen in gallery forests in grasslands have good fire resistance. Examples would be oaks, willows, and maples.

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  • $\begingroup$ Cottonwoods aren't really fire-resistant, at least as trees. The ones around my place burned quite well in the last major fire. They do tend to re-sprout quickly from stumps and roots, though, and their habit of growing along streams and in other wet places keeps smaller fires from reaching them. $\endgroup$ – jamesqf Dec 7 '17 at 21:34
  • $\begingroup$ @james Yes, you are right, they are more fire-resistant as living organisms, not as pieces of wood. $\endgroup$ – kingledion Dec 8 '17 at 13:53
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, it turns on just what the OP means by "least vulnerable". E.g. if a fire sweeps through a cottonwood grove, the standing trees will likely be blackened, dead trunks, but new growth will quickly sprout from the roots. (I can see this in my own back yard, from a fire a few years ago.) The same fire through a giant sequoia grove will just singe the outer bark, leaving the trees little affected. (But causing lots of seedlings to sprout in the burned ground.) $\endgroup$ – jamesqf Dec 8 '17 at 21:14
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My vote goes to the Giant Sequoia (sequoiadendron giganteum), which has fire-resistant bark that can be up to 2 ft/65 cm thick: https://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/08/130826-giant-sequoias-yosemite-rim-fire-forestry-science/ It grows in the Sierra Nevada, an area which is prone to forest fires, and trees likely wouldn't live to reach great age & size without being adapted to fires.

But there's a caveat for the story purposes. It's the bark that's fire resistant, not so much the actual wood (or the needles), so running chimneys up the trees may not work that well.

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