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There is a question about the title for a ruler (What royal title can an absolutistic ruler have?). That is a question about the title for the ruler and it was very well answered.

But: How to speak with them? (Or rather How to start speaking to them?)


For example, related to my world, queen Iris is a very benevolent ruler and so she allows if people speak with her in a somewhat familiar style.

Miss Iris, could you ...

It is obvious that this style is more suitable for speaking with (for example) teachers than rulers (and she was a teacher before she was elected to be queen - and she did not give up that job. Weeks have 13 days and so she has much time to do both).

What words might be better suited for speaking with rulers?

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closed as primarily opinion-based by sphennings, JBH, Vincent, L.Dutch, Vylix Nov 25 '17 at 17:56

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Just because your weeks have 13 days doesn't mean that she suddenly has enough time to lead a kingdom and be a teacher at the same time. We could easily arbitrarily set a "week" to 14 days - the amount of work that needs to be done doesn't change. We still need to eat every day after all. About the naming - this seems to depent solely on what names you want for the ruler. Queen Iris? High Leader Iris? Ruler? Which one does she accept? Is it possible to use a general honorific like the japanese "sensei" to also encompass her in your world? $\endgroup$ – Secespitus Nov 24 '17 at 22:57
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    $\begingroup$ How to speak to a ruler is highly dependent upon the cultural context. Each culture has their own concept of what is and isn't appropriate. Without knowing the culture of the ruler there is no way to answer this question with anything more than opinion. $\endgroup$ – sphennings Nov 24 '17 at 23:05
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    $\begingroup$ It is extremely highly dependent on the specific culture. For example, the queen of England is to be addressed as "Your Majesty" the first time, and then "Ma'am". For another example, in many Early Modern European countries the rules for addressing the monarch varied depending on the social status of the speaker. $\endgroup$ – AlexP Nov 25 '17 at 6:40
  • $\begingroup$ Tip: if you are asking a question based or inspired by a closed question, your question is likely to be closed as well. $\endgroup$ – Mołot Nov 26 '17 at 11:05
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There is only one rule when addressing people who have authority over you:

Out of the list of socially acceptable titles, call them by the one they want.

What is the list of socially accepted titles? That depends entirely on the language and culture. Does the language have a special form of address to rulers? Does the culture like using those forms of address? Is there a quirk of language that lets you use a diminutive form of address so you can be both respectful and modest, or any other combinations of emotions?

Alternatively, you can make up a title, such as "Lord Ruler" from the Mistborn trilogy. Other made up titles (from real life and not-so-real life) include things like "Sun King," "Cesar" (and it's translations: "Kaiser" and "Czar"). You can see a fun list here.

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