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So, on my map, I have an island, and, off the coast of that island, another, smaller island. Is there a specific geographical term for this? Is it a sub-island? A holm? I'm looking for something along the lines of the relationship between Tanzania and Australia, just in a smaller scale. I need to know this to be able to properly name my island in my game.

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closed as off-topic by sphennings, Mołot, Secespitus, Vincent, Josh King Nov 14 '17 at 3:28

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about worldbuilding, within the scope defined in the help center." – sphennings, Mołot, Secespitus, Vincent, Josh King
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ This sounds like a question about geography not worldbuilding. $\endgroup$ – sphennings Nov 13 '17 at 21:30
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    $\begingroup$ Consider asking this on english.stackexchange.com or maybe earthscience.stackexchange.com — I doubt that your question is on topic here, you're not building world, just describe it. Even if it is, English guys may be better at answering this question. $\endgroup$ – Mołot Nov 13 '17 at 21:31
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    $\begingroup$ Guys, why downvotes? This seems like a valid question, just on wrong stack. $\endgroup$ – Mołot Nov 13 '17 at 21:33
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    $\begingroup$ Tbh had no idea where to ask $\endgroup$ – ND523 Nov 13 '17 at 21:40
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    $\begingroup$ I keep thinking "neighboring island" for this arrangement. Holm would be technically correct too, I think, but I don't think that's a very common term. $\endgroup$ – MozerShmozer Nov 13 '17 at 23:03
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Island: A small parcel of land wholly surrounded by water.

Islet: A smaller parcel of land wholly surrounded by water.

Cay: An even smaller parcel of land wholly surrounded by water, usually quite low (if it has a hill, it's an islet).


Special Mentions:

Holm: A small island or inshore island (chiefly British).

Bar: Something that obstructs or prevents passage, progress, or action: such as ... (c) :a submerged or partly submerged bank (as of sand) along a shore or in a river often obstructing navigation.

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    $\begingroup$ You should add enclave if it's a island off the coast that is politically connected to another entity. Exclave if it's completely surrounded by another political territory, along the lines of the Vatican. Also bar if it's a very small island. $\endgroup$ – gwally Nov 14 '17 at 2:31
  • $\begingroup$ A cay is a low elevation sandy island on top of a coral reef. An islet is simply a very small island. But generally speaking, an island off an island is simply an island. There's no special designation. $\endgroup$ – Keith Morrison Nov 14 '17 at 4:39
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    $\begingroup$ @gwally, I added "bar," that was a good catch. I passed on enclave because I'm fairly sure the OP wasn't looking for a political reference. Interesting, though! $\endgroup$ – JBH Nov 14 '17 at 16:33
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An island off the coast of an island is called an island

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  • $\begingroup$ or an islet if it is very small $\endgroup$ – Slarty Nov 13 '17 at 23:14
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    $\begingroup$ It's the truth. A lake inside an island in a lake is still a lake. And island in a lake in an island is still an island. $\endgroup$ – Keith Morrison Nov 14 '17 at 4:36
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    $\begingroup$ It is true but it's not very helpful! Like if you asked me where I am and I answered, "On my chair" ;) $\endgroup$ – colmde Nov 14 '17 at 16:38
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    $\begingroup$ @colmde If I asked you where you were either there would be context to that question or I would supply it in my question. Without said context I might as well answer a blunt question with a blunt answer. An island is a landmass surrounded by water on all sides, any classification system beyond this is fairly subjective to the answerers locality/culture and perspective. Even JBH's answer implies this fact with the mentioning of "Holm" and the absence of size requirements for islet and cay. $\endgroup$ – anon Nov 14 '17 at 16:57

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