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The Empire is a mix of the clasic Roman one, but mixed with influence's of greek, and general central European nations of the time. I understand that the Romans had a steam engine in the works, but due to fears of economic collapse it was never fully realized. What technology's would they have access too, ignoring magic unless needed and gun weaponry (gunpowder is rare and is not aquired in the traditional sense.) Second question ever, please criticise so I can get better, thank you.

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closed as too broad by Vylix, StephenG, L.Dutch, Mołot, Magic-Mouse Oct 18 '17 at 6:43

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ What is the question here? "What technology the Romans have access to, which is never fully realized (because of fearing economic collapse) ?" $\endgroup$ – Vylix Oct 18 '17 at 3:25
  • $\begingroup$ There is a very important issue with these "what if" scenarios that make them impossible to predict - the same exists with trying to predict the future. That is the assumption that technology is like creeping flow of lava, moving forward at a constant, unstoppable rate, when it is in fact a result of individual genius and visionaries, breakthroughs, necessities, events, politics, changing fashions & economics and more stuff that you couldn't possibly predict. For example, most modern technology we have today could arguably be traced back to a driver taking a wrong turn in Sarajevo 1914! $\endgroup$ – colmde Oct 18 '17 at 11:31
  • $\begingroup$ It depends on the ways the empire evolves. The actual empire crumbled because of slavery. If your empire manages to keep its political unity while somehow doing away with slavery, then it would possibly have some advantage over our actual earthan setting. If it managed to keep its political unity and slavery, then it would qute probably be at a disadvantage. $\endgroup$ – Luís Henrique Oct 18 '17 at 13:43
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Impossible to say

Contrary to a common belief, the Middle Ages were not just a dark time of misery. There was technical and economic progress in many areas. Crop rotation, horse collars, etc. It is impossible to say if it was necessary to break the Roman manor system to make that happen, or if it would have happened anyway.

  • If you want to, you could have all the developments in Europe up to the Renaissance, except that it comes faster because there are no petty feuds. Big cities and big manors provide the surplus to fund researchers.
  • If you want to, development stagnates as the big landowners refuse to transition away from a slave economy and any surplus is wasted on orgies in the Imperial palace.
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