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In a world where people are magically affected by the sun and moon being in opposition, what do you call that in the broadest sense?

You have common werewolves, —bears, —sealions, and the occasional werekoala. Those are shape shifters that transform into an animal and lose their human intelligence. The combining form were— specifically refers to that.

But you also get affects that are not shape shifting, such as gaining or losing a special ability, or having a change in personality.

The werefolk don’t include the guy who goes from being a low-level magician to having enormous magical power; or the lady who cooks soups that are the most delicious anyone ever had, only during the full moon. There’s a football player who loses all skill at football and instead can play basketball with the same level of skill, during a full moon.

What would be a good term (either technical or popular) for this segment of the population? I’d like it to have sound linguistic roots, like Latin/Greek parts for the technical term, or plausible combining forms and popular usage etymology for a common term that just emerged from the crowd.

All of them need to care exactly when the full moon is, and (for example) can be surprised if the civil calendar is off by a day for people in some longitude range.

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closed as primarily opinion-based by sphennings, Aify, Mołot, JBH, StephenG Oct 7 '17 at 0:56

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Questions asking "What should I call X?" are often primarily opinion based. $\endgroup$ – sphennings Oct 6 '17 at 19:08
  • $\begingroup$ Loonies, Moonstruck? $\endgroup$ – Alexander Oct 6 '17 at 19:12
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    $\begingroup$ Doesn't English have the word lunatic for this express purpose? (From French lunatique, from Latin lunaticus "one who is moon-struck".) $\endgroup$ – AlexP Oct 6 '17 at 22:28
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    $\begingroup$ @sphennings The OP calls for linguistic knowledge and expertise in the answers. This doesn't within the ambit of primarily opinion-based. $\endgroup$ – a4android Oct 7 '17 at 0:29
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    $\begingroup$ Just because they want expertise doesn't mean it isn't opinion based. There still needs to be some criteria for the best answer. $\endgroup$ – Bellerophon Oct 7 '17 at 8:00
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The Latin root for "moon" would be lun(a)- (lunars, lunites). The Greek root would be selen(e)- (selenites, selenians, selenes). The Sanskrit would be chandr(a)- (chandrans?). Or, pick a language spoken where these people were first discovered, and build off the word for "moon" in that language.

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This isn't exactly correct, but since we're talking about the moon and the sun's gravitational pull, maybe you could call them tidal beings or tides. They aren't oceans, sure, but their abilities are affected by the sun and moon.

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    $\begingroup$ Tidelings sounds great $\endgroup$ – Andrey Oct 6 '17 at 19:38
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For a general term, I'd use either moonstricken or lunage. The English lunatic would also work on etymological grounds, but might be too engrained in readers' minds as a pejorative term for mentally ill. Lunage, in Old French, just means subject to the influence of the Moon. Perfect for all of your moonstricken folks perhaps? Old French is the source for many English words, so can be imported without any tax, duty or respelling.

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Since the OP is looking for the broadest term to describe shape-shifters or shape-changers affected by the phases of the Moon, it is necessary to devise a suitable technical or academic term to describe the condition.

Specifically, in the case of werewolves were a person will transform into a wolf at the full Moon. Please note the "were" part of werewolf means "man" (which can include women too, so it effectively is "person").

Academicians and technical persons dealing with this range of condition will amke the obvious connection between the phases of the Moon and the shapeshifting. This suggests they will prefer a general term such as "lunamorph". Now this literally means "moon-shape" which is reasonable considering the persons with this condition will take on a specified shape at the full Moon.

Please note: "lunamorph" is a Graeco-Roman hybrid word and Classic linguistic purists often disdain their usage. If the term was fully Greek in its etymology, it would be "selenamorph" while its Latin equivalent could be either "lunamutant" or "lunatransformer". It is the opinion of this answer that lunamorph comes more pleasantly off the tongue and because it is easier to say the word lunamorph should be the preferred term for the general class of lunar shapeshifters.

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Luna works just fine lunawolves, lunabears, lunalions, lunakoalas, and even lunaticks

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