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In my world, the main "evil" race lives in a labyrinth like rock formation. They use a method of magic that gives them a hive mind advantage, so they all know how to move around within it. My question is, are there any notable real world geographical formations that could potentially work for this? If not, I'm open to fictional concepts for this.

I recall that in the movie 'The Croods', there is a scene involving such a geography. Based on how basalt columns form, I don't think it would be out of the realm of possibility to use those either.

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to WorldBuilding Rushfire! Your question is fine but it is worded as a brainstorm, which isn't on topic for this site. We prefer questions which have an answer, instead of requests for ideas. Perhaps you could edit it to something such as "Which geographical features would be best to make a natural labyrinth?". If you haven't already, please consider taking the tour and checking out the help centre. $\endgroup$ – Aric Aug 18 '17 at 10:39
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    $\begingroup$ They are called caves $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 Aug 18 '17 at 10:58
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    $\begingroup$ Did you know a labyrinth consists of only a single, long, and convoluted path that does not require much thought. A maze, on the other hand, has a multitude of branching hallways and paths that can be taken, resulting in a structure that is far more convoluted and complicated. So someone would have to be pretty dumb to get lost in a labrinth, it is rather just long and tedious, it is also best to have traps and ambushes along it if you want to use it as protection. Even though the terms are used interchangably, they are not the same, anyways I thought it was interesting. $\endgroup$ – Necessity Aug 18 '17 at 16:57
  • $\begingroup$ I would think a series of slot canyons would do nicely. $\endgroup$ – Joshua Drake Aug 18 '17 at 19:33
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    $\begingroup$ Limestone caves? Think of the caves they get lost in in Tom Sawyer. $\endgroup$ – MissMonicaE Aug 18 '17 at 20:47
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A large area of limestone in a climate where chemical erosion is more important than physical erosion (because chemical reactions speed up as temperature increases) can produce all sorts of cool pinnacles, gorges and caves, sometimes over vast areas of land. Have a look at this page on the South China karst (a world heritage site for geology) and click on the picture gallery.

Or here is an aerial shot of limestone pinnacles in Madagascar: Tsingy de Bemaraha National Park

Tsingy de Bemaraha National Park

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    $\begingroup$ The park in Madagascar was what I immediately thought of when I read this question. $\endgroup$ – Erik Aug 18 '17 at 16:49
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    $\begingroup$ You need to work the wird karst into your answer somehow. $\endgroup$ – Spencer Aug 18 '17 at 22:54
  • $\begingroup$ @Spencer Er, it says 'South China karst' in my answer. Or do you mean add a definition of karst? $\endgroup$ – DrBob Aug 19 '17 at 17:03
  • $\begingroup$ I found a good picture of a karst structure $\endgroup$ – Aric Aug 21 '17 at 8:01
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Puzzle wood is used a lot for filming, however i'm pretty sure its features are the result of ancient mining, not natural formations:

Over a mile of pathways were laid down in the early 19th century to provide access to the woods, and provide picturesque walks. The area contains strange rock formations, secret caves and ancient trees, with a confusing maze of paths. Puzzlewood is said to be one of J. R. R. Tolkien's inspirations3 for Middle-earth in The Lord of the Rings.

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Puzzlewood was used as a filming location for many episodes of BBC TV show Merlin, "The Labyrinth of Gedref" and "The Nightmare Begins",[7] and also the 2010 Doctor Who episode "Flesh and Stone" and the 2013 Doctor Who Christmas Special "The Time of the Doctor"[8] as well as, the BBC's 2016 adaptation A Midsummer Night's Dream. Puzzlewood was used as a film location for Star Wars: The Force Awakens.[9][10]

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  • $\begingroup$ Been there. It's pretty awesome. $\endgroup$ – Sobrique Aug 18 '17 at 14:36
  • $\begingroup$ @Sobrique me too, twice ;) $\endgroup$ – Aric Aug 18 '17 at 14:41
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If you are really taking the route of an evil race living in rock mazes, then volcanism should do the trick for you.

One month ago I went to Iceland and visited Dimmuborgir, an old lava field that was really like a bubble of solid lava that collapsed on itself, with erosion (and man's hand) creating the strange structures and pathways as we see it nowadays.

Dimmuborgir

The place is really a gigantic labyrinth, and there is no picture on the internet or even in my own pictures that really retranscribes the feel of walking into such a natural maze, as we were surrounded by rocks (sometimes as sharp as glass), with the edges of the collapsed "bubble" as high as great walls, serving the role of natural fortifications because there was no more than one or two entries in the entire lava field.

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Limestone makes some very cool rock formations and interesting caves that would be perfect for your labyrinth given they have Stalactite's Stalactite column

These lime stone caves become enormous, currently the deepest cave in the world is know as the Dark Star, measuring 17km at a depth of 900m. The whole thing is lime stone and not even completely explored. It is known as the underground Everest.

Dark Star cave system

Having a lime stone cave system with a lot of water draining through it to create Stalactite columns should work perfectly for your labyrinth.

Overview of Dark Star

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You can have real rock mazes when large rock formations break and open-up corridors in them.

Think Black Hills rock maze on steroids.

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  • $\begingroup$ You could combine these rock shapes with something like Wistman's Wood for a really nice effect! $\endgroup$ – Aric Aug 18 '17 at 11:47
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One way could be Hoodoos, similar to the basalt columns you described, but with an uncommonly high density of such columns.

Another option could be sort sort of large, winding cave system that has been uncovered by erosion to form a labyrinth.

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