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The virus can attach itself to an unknown bacteria immune to antibiotics (I've simply titled TXT1) that's disguised itself as the common cold, but gets into the bloodstream through the lungs. Then when in the bloodstream in rides all the way into the brain, where it kills the human. But the virus who hitchhiked a ride to the brain on the TXT1 bacteria then needs to infect more people to keep the species going, so through the virus's capabilities of attaching to cells and bending them to their will, the virus restarts the brain. It restarts the area of the brain that controls movement to solve the problem of being unable to infect people once the host is dead. So moving back to my question; How long would it take to infect the world with the kind of zombie virus I've described? And how would this realistically affect the world?

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closed as too broad by Aify, adaliabooks, Vylix, sphennings, Azuaron Aug 18 '17 at 13:10

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ A bacterium can't "disguise itself" as the common cold, because a cold is a virus, not a bacterium. They're not alike at all. $\endgroup$ – Mike Scott Aug 18 '17 at 5:22
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    $\begingroup$ I know fully well how that works, how completely different a virus and bacteria is. I mean as in 'disguise' displays the same symptoms, not the same organism. The method in which it disguises itself is by showing the same symptoms as the common cold, even though underneath the surface something completely different is going on.. $\endgroup$ – Josh Fensler Aug 18 '17 at 5:34
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    $\begingroup$ I think you need to specify a little bit more what information you are looking for, "And how would this realistically affect the world?" is almost always going to be closed as too broad. $\endgroup$ – adaliabooks Aug 18 '17 at 8:59
  • $\begingroup$ I'd say the question is a bit to broad and lacks some of the information needed to answer. 1. How infectious is a) the bacteria and b) the virus that piggybacks on it? 2. How long is the incubation period? 3. Is the lethality rate of the TXT1 100% or less? $\endgroup$ – Doomfrost Aug 18 '17 at 11:07
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There are some issues in your story:

  1. As Mike points out, a bacterium cannot disguise itself as a virus. Moreover, a cold cannot kill too much.
  2. Once the host is dead, reactivating his brain will not enable the muscles to move. The virus may control the movement area, but the muscles won't have an energy supply to move.

But let's say that a generous sprinkle of handwavium can solve those points. Present day health organization is robust. Any case of "he got a flu, died of it and now he is walking back again with nasty intentions" would quickly be spotted if it happened in any major area.

That would lead to quick investigation and quarantine measures (that's how Zika, Ebola and other potential pandemics were contained). If it happened in some remote area, well, the remoteness of the area will make the spreading more difficult by itself.

The only way you can spread a world wide pandemic is giving your virus at least the following attributes:

  • long incubation period (so that the sick person is not spotted too early)
  • ability to infect others well before the symptomatic phase

Then place the patient 0 in a hub (a place where a lot of potential hosts can be met and further infected) like a station or an airport.

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  • $\begingroup$ I've already explained that I know fully well how that works, how completely different a virus and bacteria is. I mean as in 'disguise' displays the same symptoms, not the same organism. The method in which it disguises itself is by showing the same symptoms as the common cold, even though underneath the surface something completely different is going on. And Thanks for the 2nd problem, I didn't think of that. But in a place remote such as Morocco will have bad health care and it'll spread quickly. But since it seems as though its the common cold even though its NOT it will be treated as such. $\endgroup$ – Josh Fensler Aug 18 '17 at 5:49
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Also the rate of growth will not be so much, you have to make him infect people by everything, mosquitos, bodily fluids, air etc.And also very durable.

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