7
$\begingroup$

Let us consider two persons who can feel what the other senses and know what the other thinks. Now do these two persons have a common or single consciousness?If so,will it do good, if we succeed to help conjoined twins by brain,to achieve this single consciousness;Now they are no more two persons, but a single person with great capabilities.

Kindly refer the following link:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1331769/Doctors-stunned-conjoined-twins-share-brain-thoughts.html

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I request the community to contribute to find the means to achieve this. $\endgroup$ – Johny Royan Sep 25 '15 at 5:36
4
$\begingroup$

This is probably more suitable for the philosophy StackExchange.

You would need to choose a definition of "person" to answer this. If by "person" you mean "the physical body of a H. sapiens," then yes, that would be two persons with a common consciousness. However, "personhood" is often attributed to a single conciousness, so that definition would suggest a more accurate wording is "one person, one consciousness, two physical H. sapiens bodies."

As an imperfect example, consider the movie stereotype of identical twins. Twins are obviously not a "common consciousness," but they share enough similarity that movie characters often start treating them as one entity. At the extreme, such as in sci-fi where aliens warp the minds of twins so that they always talk in unison, the rest of the cast quickly does treat them as one entity.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
4
$\begingroup$

I've use this kind of psychically linked character pairs in a couple of my sci-fi stories. From a story mechanics point of view, they have tremendous value; being able to communicate information when seperated, totally loyal to each other against all challenges, educated and wise to a level that defies their age. Writing stories involving these kinds of characters yeilds greater opportunities for creativity than crafting tales of normal people.

I usually keep the conscousnesses seperate so that I can use each as a distinct POV character, but I give them an ongoing private dialog which is available under all conditions as long as both are awake and alive. The dynamics of two characters who thoroughly know and trust each other is a really cool spring board for storytelling.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.