2
$\begingroup$

A bit of context: there is a group of people in my world known as the Ðakrynkó who share literally nothing culturally in common with the Hungarians. Historically any independence movements have been suppressed, but in the present the idea of a separate country seems plausible, and it comes back stronger than ever. My question is: How would the Hungarian government react to this, and what would they do?

$\endgroup$

closed as off-topic by sphennings, Mołot, L.Dutch, Separatrix, Frostfyre Aug 2 '17 at 12:40

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about worldbuilding, within the scope defined in the help center." – sphennings, Mołot, L.Dutch, Separatrix, Frostfyre
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ This seems like a question about Hungarian politics not worldbuilding. $\endgroup$ – sphennings Aug 2 '17 at 3:11
  • $\begingroup$ @sphennings the Ðakrynkó only exist in my world $\endgroup$ – Qenglow Aug 2 '17 at 3:12
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Questions asking "How would the government respond to x?" are often closed as too broad. $\endgroup$ – sphennings Aug 2 '17 at 3:14
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @a4android Many questions need expertise in many fields. Why is hungarian history so different? I get that people here do not want questions about a specific country other than the us (which I see quite often) but why bs your way around a clear explanation? $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 Aug 2 '17 at 7:02
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Raditz_35 The point I was trying to make, and must have done so ineptly, was this needs answers from either Hungarians or people knowledgeable about Hungary, My concern was whether it would get good answers. I agree that isn't grounds for closing a question, & I didn't. It's not a bother. I'd rather you speak up, so any issues can be settled by an exchange of views & ideas. If anything does concern you, definitely raise it on meta. $\endgroup$ – a4android Aug 3 '17 at 2:22
3
$\begingroup$

OK, before someone close it...

Situation right now:

-in aftermath of WW1 Hungary ended up with huge Hungarian inhabited areas outside its borders (much smaller then if someone drew a map based on dominating ethnic group).

-communist often tended to keep overrepresentative number of minorities (not only Jews) in Stalin era in secret police, which often brings some extra grudge (and not only minority may perceive itself as victim)

-Right now Hungary is in the EU and on the lead is nationalistic leaning Orban, who is quite smart opportunist

-EU would generally support some minor autonomy for any ethnic group, but actually would be against separatism

-if anyone whine too much Orban could suggest just redrawing borders in whole region, based on ethnic composition - of course no one would like that or give it a try, but then the whole idea would become moot

-the most unhappy members of minority would migrate to western part of the EU, while looking for work

-such minority would be presumably perceived as 5th column and used in political debate

So: As much minority rights as the EU may enforce and forget about any independence.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I want to add a few points: Hungary plays an important role in preventing refugees entering richer European countries. The core EU has so far accepted the very harsh treatment of refugees by Hungary as a "necessary evil". Also Spain has a large separatist movement as well as others (too many for a comment) that have similar issues, unjust territory or seperatism - the EU is actually quite anti ethnic minorities getting their demands. Also Hungary is an important ally for core EU members to pass certain laws. So I think the EU would look the other way almost no matter what Hungary does $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 Aug 2 '17 at 8:27
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Basically, the chance of a compact ethnic group living in pre-WW1 Hungary and not getting their own country (or anyway foregoing the affections of Budapest) at the end of the war is between zero and infinitesimally small. Just about all non-Hungarian ethnic groups living in pre-WW1 Hungary jumped at the chance of leaving the benevolent kingdom of Saint Stephen... Even some ethnic Hungarians chose to become Austrians when given the chance. The only exceptions were the Jews and the Gypsies, but the Jews did not have an ethnic majority anywhere and nobody bothered to ask the Gypsies. $\endgroup$ – AlexP Aug 2 '17 at 11:14
  • $\begingroup$ @AlexP What constitutes an ethnic group depends though - mostly on people believing in it. Most were invented/formed in approx. the 19th century, many after WW1 and others after WW2. I do not want to name examples from Eastern European countries in case someone is offended (people are very touchy these days), but I could. I could also name Scotland. Something like an identity within that group might have only developed recently for god knows what reason, I would certainly argue the time is right for such movements. $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 Aug 2 '17 at 11:40
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @Raditz_35: You are right, of course, that ethnic groups are self-defined. I was speaking of ethnic groups as they were recognized at the time. One of the consequences was that after WW1 (and, doubly so, after WW2) Hungary became one of the most ethnically pure European countries; I don't think that in Communist-controlled ethnically pure Hungary there was much chance of a new ethnic groups to self-organize. $\endgroup$ – AlexP Aug 2 '17 at 11:44
  • $\begingroup$ @AlexP I agree, the evidence is there: They didn't. But with those facebook kids these days ... someone finds an article of how their strip of land once was controlled by duke whatever - people are crazy ;). I think it can work in a piece of fiction $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 Aug 2 '17 at 11:47

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.