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Bad guys will do bad things, no matter how far in the future we go to. Even with space travel and other lifeforms to live alongside humanity, crime will rear its ugly head no anywhere, anytime. So someone must keep law and order, hence the many police agencies all over the galaxy that keep order and peace among the masses. Be they humans, scaly reptile people or floating jellyfishes, everyone answers to the law.

Yet at times they may need some help which is where freelancing work falls into play. Sanctioned individuals who work outside the departments to aid in investigations, apprehend criminals and when things go really wrong, rid the problem with one squeeze of the trigger. What I'm trying to reach for here is something like Noir style detectives but in the future, if that makes sense.

How would officers view these entities? Would they be a detriment to an investigation? Would they be able to properly help law agencies in dealing with crime?

Appreciate any input on this, this idea has been buzzing a lot in my mind lately.

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  • $\begingroup$ In today society, role of private detectives is highly fictionalized. You won't find many, or possibly any "Sherlock Holmses" working along with police. However, if you have a hypothetical futuristic society in mind, that may be possible. $\endgroup$ – Alexander Jun 28 '17 at 0:53
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    $\begingroup$ Real detectives do divorces, background checks, security, locating people, what they don't do is aid investigations Noir gumshoes are pure fiction. What you are thinking about would be called Paycops. Police work outsourced to the private sector. Real police would regard them as scum who get in the way of real policing! $\endgroup$ – a4android Jun 28 '17 at 6:01
  • $\begingroup$ They might be particularly helpful if you are looking for replicants. $\endgroup$ – Raditz_35 Jun 28 '17 at 14:00
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Most of the work of these private eyes usually will fall into extramarital affairs, small time embezzlers, and missing persons.

They rarely want to put anyone in jail, but find evidence to use against some in court. Cops will usually treat them with some contempt, but they won't cross paths most of the time.

Now, if they are the kind of fictional private eye that goes around investigating murders, then you will have cops getting angry with them for getting in the way, contaminating crime scenes, talking with important witnesses before the proper authorities.

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    $\begingroup$ They are also useful for civil litigation problems -- like figuring out if some presumed defendant actually exists or not, as well as in-depth background investigations and other miscellaneous investigatory whatnot. (They may also get hired by defense attorneys, which could get them involved with more major crimes.) $\endgroup$ – Shalvenay Jun 28 '17 at 1:18
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Uber model.

Just as freelance individuals operating via Uber are displacing traditional taxis, in the future freelance part-time lawmen will largely replace a standing police corp. Needed law officers will be assembled on an ad hoc basis from the regional population, using the Deputize app.

I can imagine that just as a given Uber driver might have preferred hours / neighborhoods / passenger types, a given Depcop might prefer certain jobs over others. One might like the bustle of traffic work and crowd control. One might crave the adrenaline of the domestic dispute call. Others might have more esoteric tastes.

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  • $\begingroup$ Well, if there will be enough citizens with spare detective skills as there are enough spare drivers today, this may work. $\endgroup$ – Alexander Jun 28 '17 at 1:58
  • $\begingroup$ They will pick up specific cop skills on the job. Like my cab driver last week - crazy aggressive cabbie skills. But when the windows fogged up (we were wet!) he did not know how to operate the defroster. I do not think he knew what it was,. $\endgroup$ – Willk Jun 28 '17 at 2:00

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