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In our world, Mother Nature has returned and is pleased with the spread of one of the most ubiquitous birds, the Peregrine Falcon and has granted them the intelligence capacity of a human from now on. That is to say, they are born and grow in intellect like we do. For 16+ years, they can learn just like we do - or even more quickly if there's a will. Humankind is aware of this, and ready to help and hinder.

There is now a bird that can read and can operate a computer or a kindle or whatever, can learn a rough way to communicate in bird-speak. In one generation of the birds, with our assistance, what would be the result of this experiment?

Note: This is 2017, it is the same Earth, and their species will forever have the capacity to learn - I am just interested in the first generation (whether they're a chick or an adult, suddenly with the capacity to learn) and how they integrate (or don't). Their range, as you know, is pretty much all over the world.

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    $\begingroup$ Freedom, pure unadulterated freedom! $\endgroup$ – KareemElashmawy Jun 5 '17 at 21:51
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    $\begingroup$ This seems to be “too broad” and is asking a fully open-ended prompt. See also “I have a High Concept, please do my work for me” $\endgroup$ – JDługosz Jun 8 '17 at 8:22
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    $\begingroup$ Ah @JDługosz I always agree with you - it's an aside to a story, and I think you're right, it's a heavy request. $\endgroup$ – Mikey Jun 8 '17 at 9:32
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In one generation, changes would be minimal.

If domesticated, falcons can become better companions than dogs or cats, but there is a little chance that those birds would develop a civilization of their own in a short time. However, they may become a nuisance for the human one.

Intellectual capacity does not equal intelligence and more so, a civilization. First thing is the language. Without proper communication, species' ability to learn (and teach their young) is severely limited. Falcons don't have adequate language and they can not simply borrow any human language (whereas parrots or crows, for example, could). With the help of human researchers, they can come up with a suitable language that would be as complex as human one, but that would take longer than one falcon generation.

Next thing is the ability to alter the environment, make tools and use them. Beaks and talons are versatile, but not as good as human hands for this purpose. So it is up to humans to invent tools and devices that birds can use. Without this help falcons could make much trouble (mis)using human devices, but they would not be much useful for bird's own benefit.

So, in 16 years I think falcons will become a "sidekick" species, however without the ability to stand on their own.

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    $\begingroup$ They would start a political movement. Demanding humans stop with the air pollution, point to point microwave beams through the sky, and other flight hazards like jet engines. $\endgroup$ – steverino Jun 6 '17 at 2:06
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In our world,

Yours, maybe, not mine. :-)

Mother Nature has returned

She was away ?

and is pleased with the spread of one of the most ubiquitous birds, the Peregrine Falcon and has granted them the intelligence capacity of a human from now on.

Where did Mother Nature put all this intelligence ?

While it's not agreed that there is a clear relationship between individual human brain size and human intelligence, it's almost certain that they'd need a brain of roughly comparable size (and function) to have comparable intelligence.

If you pack a larger brain into their existing frame (expanding the skull as needed) you're going to create a creature which is completely unbalanced. It will cease to be able to fly, probably would be barely able to move.

Where's the body to support the brain - by which I mean not just the mechanical support, but to supply it oxygen and other chemicals ? I'd be surprised if a falcon heart could pump enough blood to maintain a human sized brain or the lungs were capable of oxygenating blood quickly enough to cope with the flow required.

It's completely unrealistic.

There is now a bird that can read and can operate a computer or a kindle or whatever, can learn a rough way to communicate in bird-speak.

Operating a computer, just in mechanical terms, requires quite a lot of learning. I do not think a falcon can operate a complex device like this, and by operate I mean just not break it more often than not.

"Communicate in bird speak". With what ? It takes years to train a human to speak at all (and it's mostly nonsense even after that :-)) and humans come with the a physical mechanism designed for complex verbal communication. A falcon lacks this. I see no way for them to speak or communicate in a complex way with any kind of speech.

In one generation of the birds, with our assistance, what would be the result of this experiment?

A dying species of immobile falcon, requiring life support to just stay alive.

I'd be astonished if they could procreate because I doubt they'd live that long. So forget about generation two.

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The results would likely be total alienation. They grow up with a massive divide between them and all others of their kind as well as humans. Born without any sort of cultural belonging and being trained by hyper advanced beings that both resent and are obsessed with you. It would be panic, their only tether to culture is one not built to accommodate their form. They have no hands to wright, no adequate vocal cords to talk like humans and no preexisting bird language to communicate with each other.

You would have to build them thought controlled robotic mounts with voice synthesizers that do not prevent them from flying. Then you have to have them be raised by humans and slow down their ageing to allow them time to learn (among other things) our complex social behavior. It could be done, but then you have to deal with humans possessing both surrogate body technology as well as longevity.

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